hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 86 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
ne of Epicurus so far asit related to the organ of taste. When he indulged in a hasty plate of soup it was unavoidable, and he has been known to raise a storm because the guest at his table would cut lettuce instead of rolling the leaf around his fork so as not to bruise it. The old soldier is resting quietly now where the Hudson's silvery sands roll ‘mid the hills afar, and if he lacked to some degree personal popularity, was without magnetic influence, and did not possess that power which Carnot calls the Glory of the soldier and the strength of armies, he is remembered by the whole country as a courteous and chivalric gentleman and as a great commander of true military genius. His unswerving friendship for Robert E. Lee and his never-failing belief in his military ability was demonstrated by his recommendation that he should be his successor, and which doubtless prompted the United States government to offer to Brevet-Colonel Lee the position of commander in chief of their armi
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
7, 48, , 175, 177, 180, 182, 205, 215; commands army, character, 222; mentioned, 224, 225, 226, 228, 229, 238, 239, 240; his corps at Petersburg, 355. Burnt House Fields, 4. Bustamente, General, mentioned, 32. Butler, General Benjamin F., mentioned, 110, 323, 340; bottled up, 341. Butterfield, General, Daniel, mentioned, 226, 241, 302. Calhoun, John C., mentioned, 43. Cameron, Simon, mentioned, 88, 103. Campbell Court House, 387. Camp Cooper, Texas, 59, 61, 66, 68, 69. Carnot, quotation from, 49. Carrick's Ford, 15. Carroll, Governor, of Maryland, 300. Carter, Anne Hill, 16. Carter, Charles Hill, 16. Casey, General, Silas, 167. Catumseh, a chief, 73. Cavalry contest at Gettysburg, 298. Cavalry raids, 266. Cemetery Heights, 292. Cemetery Hill, 273. Cemetery Ridge, 289-296. Cerro Gordo, battle of, 38, 40. Chambliss, General John R., killed, 362. Champe, Sergeant, 9. Chancellorsville, battle of, 241. Chapman, Major, William, 63. Ch
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
t contradiction, the most complete that exists on the tactics of battles, and if it falls sometimes into an excess contrary to that of the Prussian general, by prescribing, in doctrines details of execution often impracticable in war, he cannot be denied a truly remarkable merit, and one of the first grades among tacticians. I have made mention in this sketch only of general treatises, and not of particular works on the special arms. The books of Montalembert, of Saint-Paul, Bousmard, of Carnot, of Aster, and of Blesson, have caused progress to be made in the art of sieges and of fortification. The writings of Laroche-Aymon, Muller and Bismark, have also thrown light upon many questions regarding the cavalry. In a journal with which, unfortunately, I was not acquainted until six years after its publication, the latter has believed it his duty to attack me and my works, because I had said, on the faith of an illustrious general, that the Prussians had reproached him with having co
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
say a few words upon another manner of influencing military operations: it is that of councils of war established in the capitol near the government. Louvois, directed a long time from Paris, the armies of Louis XIV, and did it with success. Carnot directed also from Paris the armies of the Republic; in 1793 he did very well, and saved France; in 1794 he did at first very badly, then repaired his faults by chance; in 1796 he did decidedly very badly. But Louvois and Carnot directed alone tCarnot directed alone the operations without assembling a council. The Aulic council of war, established at Vienna, had often the mission of directing the operations of the armies; there has never been but one voice in Europe upon the fatal effects which have resulted from it; is it wrong or right? Austrian generals can alone decide. As far as I am concerned, I think that the only attribute which such a I council should have, is reduced to the adoption of a general plan of operations. It is already known that
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
r to those skermishers! The poor man had not perceived that the skermishers made the noise, but that the columns carried the positions. The first generals of the republic were fighting mien, and nothing more; the principal direction came from Carnot and the Committee of Public Safety; it was sometimes good, but also frequently bad. It must be owned, nevertheless, one of the best strategical movements of this war came from him; it was he who directed, at the end of 1793, a choice reserve succmployment of masses, with a good direction, we shall only be the more assured of victory and its great results. The operations which best prove these truths are those so often cited of 1809 and 1814, as also that ordered at the end of 1793, by Carnot, already mentioned in Art. 24, and the details of which will be found in vol. 4, of my history of the wars of the Revolution. Forty battalions, transported successively from Dunkirk to Menin, to Mauberge and to Landan, by reinforcing the armies
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
ch Revolution, wars were carried on mainly by the system of positions--one party confining their operations to the security of certain important places, while the other directed their whole attention to the siege and capture of these places. But Carnot and Napoleon changed this system, at the same time with the system of tactics, or rather, returned from it to the old and true system of strategic operations. Some men, looking merely at the fact that a change was made, but without examining the the allies in check for a whole year; and again, in 1792, compelled the Austrians to raise the siege after an unsuccessful attack of fifteen days. Antwerp, in 1585, sustained a siege of fourteen months against greatly superior forces; in 1814 Carnot defended the citadel of this place for four months, and until an armistice had been concluded between the contending parties; in 1832, it sustained, with a garrison of only 4,500 men and 145 pieces of ordnance, a siege of twenty-five days, agains
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 13: permanent fortifications.—Historical Notice of the progress of this Art.—Description of the several parts of a Fortress, and the various Methods of fortifying a position (search)
those of Cormontaigne. Some of these modifications are very valuable improvements, while others are of a more character. Bousmard is, on the whole, a very able writer, and his works should be found in the library of every military engineer. Carnot's celebrated treatise was published in 1810. He was evidently a man of genius, and during his career at the head of the War Department of France, numerous and very important improvements were made in the several branches of the military art, andew fortifications of Western Germany are modifications of Rempler's system, as improved by De la Chiche and Montalembert. It is said that General Aster, the directing engineer, has also introduced some of the leading principles of Chasseloup and Carnot. The English engineers have satisfied themselves with following in the track of their continental neighbors, and can offer no claims to originality. Of the system of fortification now followed in our service we must decline expressing any o
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 14: field-engineering.—Field Fortifications.—Military Communications.—Military Bridges.—Sapping, Mining, and the attack and defence of a fortified place (search)
-le-Duc. Elemens de fortification. Bellaire. La science des ingenieurs. Belidor. L'art universel des fortifications. Bitainvieu. Nouvelle maniere de fortifier les places. Blondel. Les sept sieges de Lille. Brun Lavaine. Defense des places fortes. Carnot. Memoire sur la fortification. Carnot. Defense de Saragosse. Cavallero. Memoires sur la fortification. Choumara. Nouvelle fortification. Coehorn. Theorie de la fortification. Cugnot. Des fortifications, &c. &c. Darcon. Relation de la defense de Carnot. Defense de Saragosse. Cavallero. Memoires sur la fortification. Choumara. Nouvelle fortification. Coehorn. Theorie de la fortification. Cugnot. Des fortifications, &c. &c. Darcon. Relation de la defense de Dantzik. D'Artois. Les fortifications. Deville. Peribologie. Dilich. De la fortification permanente. Dufour. A work of merit. Essai sur la defense des états par les fortifications. Duvivier. Attaque et defense des places du camp de St. Omer. L‘école de la fortification. Fallois. Introduction à la fortification. De Fer. Precis de la defense de Valenciennes. Ferrand. Traite theorique, &c. Foissac-Latour. Examen detaille, &c. Foissac-Latour. Les ouvrages militaires de Fosse. Instruction sur la fort
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 15: military Education—Military schools of France, Prussia, Austria, Russia, England, &c.—Washington's reasons for establishing the West point Academy.—Rules of appointment and Promotion in foreign Services.—Absurdity and injustice of our own system. (search)
of the age. His whole life was devoted to the military art. Berthier and Marmont were both sons of officers, and, being early intended for the army, they received military educations. Lecourbe had also the advantages of a military education before entering the army. Pichegru and Duroc were pupils of the military school of Brienne. Drouet was a pupil of the artillery school. Foy was first educated in the college of Soissons, and afterwards in the military schools of La Fere and Chalons. Carnot, called the Organizer of French victory, received a good early education, and was also a pupil of the engineer school of Mezieres. Several of the distinguished French generals at first received good scientific and literary educations in the colleges of France, and then acquired their military instruction in the subordinate grades of the army; and by this means, before their promotion to responsible offices, acquired a thorough practical instruction, founded on a basis of a thorough prelim
cDowell when they reached the banks of the Potomac, after that ill-fated July Sunday at Bull Run. Dispirited by the sting of defeat, this motley and unorganized mass of men became rather a mob than an army. The transformation of this chaos of demoralization into the trained, disciplined, and splendid troops of the Grand Army of the Potomac, was a problem to challenge the military genius of the century. Fresh from his victories in the mountains of West Virginia, imbued with the spirit of Carnot, that military discipline is the glory of the soldier and the strength of armies, General George Brinton McClellan began the task of transmuting the raw and untutored regiments into fighting men who were to bear the brunt of the conflict, until the victory should be theirs at Appomattox. Never, since the days of Baron Steuben at Valley Forge, had the American citizen soldier received such tuition in the art of war. It was a gigantic attempt; but with the flower of the youth of the North, th
1 2 3