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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
Kirkpatrick and McLaughlin, of the artillery, distinguished at Winchester; Captains Massey, killed, and Carpenter, wounded; Captain Garber wounded at Berryville; Colonel Pendleton, Adjutant-General of Early's corps, killed at Fisher's Hill while gallantly rallying the fugitives; Colonel Samuel Moore, Inspector-General of Early's corps; Colonel Green Peyton, Adjutant-General Rodes' division; Captain Lewis Randolph, of Rodes' staff; Colonel R. W. Hunter, Adjutant-General Gordon's division; Colonel Carr, Inspector-General Breckinridge's division, captured near Cross Keys, Valley of Virginia; Major Brethard, artillery; Major S. V. Southall, Adjutant-General of Artillery, wounded at Monocacy; Captain Percy, Inspector of Artillery; Major Moorman, of artillery; Lieutenant Long, Engineer Corps, killed at Cedar creek while rallying fugitives; Lieutenant Christian, of the artillery, also wounded at Cedar creek; Lieutenant Hobson, of artillery, killed at Monocacy; Dr. McGuire, Medical Director o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The First North Carolina Volunteers and the battle of Bethel. (search)
spirit there would not be an assailable point in Virginia. After the battle they shook hands affectionately with the spades, calling them Clever fellows and good friends. The men are influenced by high moral and religious sentiments, and their conduct has furnished another example of the great truth that he who fears God will ever do his duty to his country. The Confederates had in all about twelve hundred men in the action. The enemy had the regiments of Colonel Duryea (zouaves), Colonel Carr, Colonel Allen, Colonel Bendix, and Colonel Waldrop (Massachusetts) from Old Point Comfort, and five companies of Phelps' regiment from Newport News We had never more than three hundred actively engaged at any one time. The Confederate loss was eleven wounded; of these, one mortally. The enemy must have lost some three hundred. I could not, without great disparagement of their courage, place their loss at a lower figure. It is inconceivable that five thousand men should make so precip
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
e, yet in the absence of such, it merits preservation. Perhaps its publication may elicit a perfect roll. Captain, William M. McGregor. First Lieutenant, Charles E. Ford. Second Lieutenant, Ro. Burwell. Second Lieutenant, Wilmer Brown. Non-commissioned officers and Privates. Adams, Avery, (deserted at Culpeper C. H.) Anderson, Brown, J. T., Sergeant, Brown, Blassingame, Brieux, Butterly, Bollinger, Bini, Brooks, Bagiacaluppo, Byron, Ball, Carr, Carrico, Cardwell, Cross, (deserted,) Carrington, Chamberlaine, Corneau, Chichester, A., Sergeant, Chichester, D. M., Levy, Coon. Cook, J. D., Sergeant, McCaffrey Cook, J. E., Crook, (deserted,) Constantini, Cochran, Davis, DeMaine, Doggett, Petty, Dinwiddie, W., Dinwiddie, M., Dominck, Ewing, Evans, Freeman, Fleiner, Flannigan, W. W., Gleason, Guillemot, C. J. Orderly Sergeant, Hitt, Hunter, Holmes,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
etermined to break up this observation post of the Confederates, and organized an expedition for that purpose, consisting of about 4,400 men from the First, Second, Third, Fifth and Seventh New York regiments, under the commands of Colonels Allen, Carr, Townsend, Duryea, and Bendix, respectively; the First Vermont, Fourth Massachusetts, and Second United States Artillery (regulars), under Lieutenant John T. Greble, with orders to burn both Bethels; blow up if of brick (meaning Little Bethel and th Carolina Military Institute defended the howitzer under Lieutenant Hudnall, and acted with great coolness and determination. The Confederates had in all 1,200 men in the action. The enemy had the regiments of Colonel Duryea (Zouaves), Colonel Carr, Colonel Allen, Colonel Bendix, and Colonel Winthrop (Massachusetts), from Old Point Comfort, and five companies of Phelp's Regiment, from Newport News. We had never more than 300 actively engaged at any one time. The Confederate loss was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
etermined to break up this observation post of the Confederates, and organized an expedition for that purpose, consisting of about 4,400 men from the First, Second, Third, Fifth and Seventh New York regiments, under the commands of Colonels Allen, Carr, Townsend, Duryea, and Bendix, respectively; the First Vermont, Fourth Massachusetts, and Second United States Artillery (regulars), under Lieutenant John T. Greble, with orders to burn both Bethels; blow up if of brick (meaning Little Bethel and th Carolina Military Institute defended the howitzer under Lieutenant Hudnall, and acted with great coolness and determination. The Confederates had in all 1,200 men in the action. The enemy had the regiments of Colonel Duryea (Zouaves), Colonel Carr, Colonel Allen, Colonel Bendix, and Colonel Winthrop (Massachusetts), from Old Point Comfort, and five companies of Phelp's Regiment, from Newport News. We had never more than 300 actively engaged at any one time. The Confederate loss was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
t of Petersburg, Va. Abell, Caleb, private, captured on retreat to Appomattox (dead). Burnley, Horace B., private, captured at Fort Steadman (dead). Brown, J. Mannis, private, surrendered at Appomattox (dead). Bailey, John, private, captured (dead). Coleman, James T., private, killed at Hatcher's Run, 1864. Catterton, George Newton, orderly sergeant, wounded and captured at Fort Steadman. Catterton, Elijah N., captured at Fort Steadman (dead). Chapman, N. T. (Bose). Carr, James, captured on retreat. Coles, Thomas S., sick and died in a Petersburg hospital. Earley, Jerry A. Elliott, M. D., captured at Fort Steadman (living). Fry, J. N. Harris, James O., sergeant, surrendered at Appomattox (dead). Harris, Henry, captured at Fort Steadman. Hurt, Morris, captured on retreat to Appomattox (dead). Hill, Joseph, captured (dead). Jarman, J. L. (living). Kirby, J. S., wounded at Hatcher's Run. Kirby, Edward, captured. Maupin, Gabrie
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
th of Sugar Creek, at a place called Cross Hollows. Carr's division was encamped near him. Sigel, with the nuwest. The right of the Federal army was composed of Carr's division, which, at the first indication of the enred his right flank. The attack of the enemy forced Carr to face northward, and thus gave to the Federal armyroad, in sight of Elkhorn Tavern, at the moment when Carr was preparing to dispute that position with them. Tl guns at the outset of the battle. On the right, Carr was being more and more closely pressed and Price waspace separating the right of Sigel's divisions from Carr's left. Davis received the attack of McIntosh and Mtill retiring before the vigorous attacks of Price. Carr, aided only by a few regiments detached from Davis'shose troops back to the right, upon the ground where Carr had struggled all day and lost one-third of his effeould be attacked on the right by Asboth, in front by Carr, and on the left by Davis, Osterhaus, deploying stil
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
l and Confederate armies, to explain the third book. I. Report of the Federal armies in Virginia On the 15th of August, 1862. Army of the Potomac—Major-General McClellan. 2d corps, Sumner. 1st Division, Richardson. 1st Brigade, Caldwell; 2d Brigade, Meagher; 3d Brigade, French. 2d Division, Sedgwick. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, Burns; 3d Brigade, Abercrombie. 3d corps, Heintzelman. 1st Division, Hooker. 1st Brigade, Sickles; 2d Brigade, Grover; 3d Brigade, Carr. 2d Division, Kearny. 1st Brigade, Robertson; 2d Brigade, Birney; 3d Brigade, Berry. 4th corps, Keyes. 1st Division, Couch. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, ......; 3d Brigade, Howe. 2d Division, Peck. 1st Brigade, ......; 2d Brigade, Palmer; 3d Brigade, Naglee. 5th corps, Franklin. 1st Division, Slocum. 1st Brigade, Newton; 2d Brigade, Taylor; 3d Brigade, Bartlett. 2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Davidson. 6th corps, F.
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
Pine Bluff, a post situated lower down the Arkansas which it is necessary to retain in order to protect the navigation of the river, he has only eight thousand men to take the field with. The half of his force consists of cavalry commanded by General Carr. He starts on March 24th. Three days before, General Thayer, who commanded the Army of the Frontier, had left Fort Smith to join him. The rendezvous was at Arkadelphia, on the banks of the Washita. Lower down this river is the town of Camdenich Kirby Smith had sacrificed the more certain hope of making the victory at Mansfield complete. Without showing a disposition to acknowledge his mistake, he sought to repair it, but it was too late. Steele, on his side, after having despatched Carr with all his cavalry on the road to Little Rock for exploration, and to protect the train which he was impatiently awaiting, set out slowly on the march. His famished soldiers finally saw the train arrive, and on the 2d of May they re-entered in
p. 1504. Dissimulation is the vice of those who have neitheir true judgment nor courage. King James, from his imbecility, was false, and sometimes vindicated his falsehood, as though deception and cunning had been worthy of a king. But he was an awkward liar, rather than a crafty dissembler. Hallam's England, i. 404. He could, before parliament, call God to witness his sincerity, when he was already resolved on being insincere. His cowardice was such, that he feigned a fondness for Carr, whose arrest for murder he had secretly ordered. He was afraid of his wife; could be governed by being overawed; and was easily intimidated by the vulgar insolence of Buckingham. Clarendon's Rebellion, i. 16. Hume, c. XLIX. i. In Scotland, he solemnly declared his attachment Calderwood's Church of Scotland 286. to the Puritan discipline and doctrines; but it was from his fear of open resistance. The pusillanimous man assents from cowardice, and recovers boldness with the assurance
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