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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 23 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 26 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Carroll or search for Carroll in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
rsation which you had with Jacob Thompson early in April, when he laid his hand on the dispatches. A.--Mr. Surratt, General Carroll and myself. Q.--Can you state whether any of these persons participated in the conversation? A.--General CarrollGeneral Carroll, of Tennessee, did. He was more anxious that Mr. Johnson should be killed than anybody else. General Carroll denounces this as false, and shows by the certificate of Dr. McDonnell, an eminent physician of Montreal, and Mr. A. S. Huntington, withGeneral Carroll denounces this as false, and shows by the certificate of Dr. McDonnell, an eminent physician of Montreal, and Mr. A. S. Huntington, with whom he boarded, that he was confined to his bed from the 1st to the 15th of April in consequence of a very painful disease, and that he was all the time under the care of Dr. McDonnell, thus completely exploding the story of the dispatches, cipher letter and apochryphal Surratt conversations. Says General Carroll: The facile ease with which this infamous wretch, Conover, commits perjury, is only equalled by the fertility of his brain in conceiving diabolical plots and involving innocent p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
on to parley with Lincoln. He parleyed — but Scott pushed his troops through by way of Annapolis, while at Chambersburg and Harrisburg, on our Northern frontier, he massed other columns. His cavalry marched acrossed from Carlisle to Georgetown. A week's delay and all was lost in Maryland by way of an appeal to arms--40,000 men in Washington and Annapolis to control Baltimore and the lower counties — and heavy masses in border. Pennsylvania to be precipitated on Frederick, Washington and Carroll, when necessary, these effectually crushed out hopes of organized resistance there. From that day to this, Maryland has never been without a garrison equal to 30,000 to 40,000 men. When the disastrous delay of Virginia and the Middle States, and the want of preparation of our own people, had reduced us to this condition-many persons thought they had but one alternative with honor. This was, temporarily leaving home and friends, to carry the flag of Maryland with the Southern army, and