Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for George W. Carter or search for George W. Carter in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

e committee — were not the same, but that the former had undergone essential changes. The question was then put on the motion to strike out the report of the Committee and insert the substitute offered by Mr. Carlile, and resulted as follows: Year.--Messrs. Burley, Carlile, Hubbard, and Porter--4. Nays.--Messrs. Ambler, Armstrong, Aston, Baylor, Berlin, Blakey, Blow, Jr., Boggess, Boisseau, Borst, Boyd, Branch, Brent, Brown, Bruce, Burdett, Byrne, Cabell, Campbell, Caperton, Carter, Chambliss, Chapman, Clemens, Coffman, Conn, C. B. Conrad, R. Y. Conrad, J. H. Cox, R. H. Cox, Custis Deskins, Dulany, Early, Echols, Fisher, Forbes, French, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Graham, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, J. Goode, Jr., T. F. Goode, Addison Hall, Cyrus Hall, E. B. Hall, L. S. Hall, Hammond, Harvie, Haymond, Hoge, Holcombe, Holladay, Hull, Isbell, Jackson, Marmaduke Johnson, Peter C. Johnston, Kilby, Kindred, Lawson, Leake, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Charles K. Mallory, James
Dr. Geo. W. Carter on the present Aspect of Affires. --Dr. Geo. W. Carter, President of Soule University in Texas, (formerly of Virginia,) addressed a large concourse of citizens on the vexed questions which at present interest the public, at the African Church, at 7½ o'clock last night. The conceded ability of the orator prevents any comments on the manner of disposing of his theme. He said that his excuse for appearing on the political forum would exonerate him in the eyes of Southern Dr. Geo. W. Carter, President of Soule University in Texas, (formerly of Virginia,) addressed a large concourse of citizens on the vexed questions which at present interest the public, at the African Church, at 7½ o'clock last night. The conceded ability of the orator prevents any comments on the manner of disposing of his theme. He said that his excuse for appearing on the political forum would exonerate him in the eyes of Southern auditors. He stated and vindicated the views of those who held secession to be our only remedy for intolerable grievances.--He held that it was a conservative remedy for our wrongs, rendered expedient by the unfriendly tendencies of our Northern allies, their assumption of power, and a radical difference in sentiment, which rendered harmony and brotherly union impossible.--By secession, the now determined foes of our domestic institutions would be converted into conservative allies. It was our