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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 202 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 112 6 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 75 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 40 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 39 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 38 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 23 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Silas Casey or search for Silas Casey in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
ollowed along the Yorktown road by the divisions of Generals Joseph Hooker and Philip Kearney, and on the Winn's Mill road, which joins the former within two miles of Williamsburg, by the divisions of Generals W. F. Smith, Darius N. Couch, and Silas Casey. Those of Generals Israel B. Richardson, John Sedgwick, and Fitz-John Porter, were moved to the vicinity of Yorktown, to be ready to go forward as a supporting force, if required, or to follow Franklin's division, which was to be sent up the Richmond. His advanced light troops had reached Bottom's The modern White House. bridge, on the Chickahominy, at the crossing of the New Kent road, two days before. The Confederates had destroyed the bridge, but left the point uncovered. Casey's division of Keyes's corps was thrown across, May 20. and occupied the heights on the Richmond side of the stream, supported by Heintzelman. In the mean time a most important movement had been made in McClellan's rear by the Confederates at
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
troops on the other side. He ascertained that Casey's division of Keyes's corps held an advanced pion began to move toward Keyes's front. General Casey, who was in the advance, had intimations ointended attack that day, and was vigilant. Casey's pickets had that morning captured Lieutenantst noon the Confederates came in heavy force. Casey's picket-line, with the One Hundred and third otwithstanding the great odds against them, Casey's division numbered only a little more than fol enfilading fires to which they were exposed, Casey's men brought off three-fourths of their cannot arrive until it was almost too late. Seeing Casey's peril, he ordered forward several of Couch'seintzelman was informed of the heavy attack on Casey, he sent an officer with the news to Generals t of the site of the seven Pines tavern, where Casey's division fought so desperately after the chaw the contest. They remained on the ground of Casey's camp during the day, as a cover to the movem[7 more...]