Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Lewis Cass or search for Lewis Cass in all documents.

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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Inaugural glories. (search)
le for place, this contest for collectorships and clerkships, this pother about post-offices: in short, if we may use a coarse word, this grand grab for provender. The Malakoff was not more closely invested than the White House is now; and we verily believe that no Russian soldier in that stronghold was ever in half so much danger of his life as Mr. Buchanan is at the present time. We can easily imagine, without personal observation, (for we have only asked for the appointment of our friend Cass,) how the poor President is baited and bullied and beset; how the hungry beggars do invade the privacy of bed-chamber, of library and of parlor; how the perpetual knocking at the portals sounds in his ears like the unmentionable gentleman's tattoo — a reveille of continually-recurring wretchedness. We all know what a chronic bother are the little boys and girls who come into our areas for broken victuals; but what are they to swarms of adult mendicants, swarming from all quarters and bawling
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mason's manners. (search)
a devotee of the principle of rotation, and that as for resigning he will see Mr. Buchanan----first. But this is a weakness, if it be a weakness, with the whole diplomatic body. In fact, we think we can hear Mr. Buchanan chanting to our friend Cass: Why do n't the men resign, my Cass-- Why do n't the men resign? Each one seems coming to the point, But never sends a line. Mr. Buchanan ought not to be so impatient. Suppose that he were abroad, and did not want to come home; how would he lCass-- Why do n't the men resign? Each one seems coming to the point, But never sends a line. Mr. Buchanan ought not to be so impatient. Suppose that he were abroad, and did not want to come home; how would he like to be pricked in the tender parts of his constitution? But the reader may fancy that we are never coming to the point. It is not a point at all. It is the back of a chair. Of a chair, we believe, at the Tuileries. And of a chair with an empress in it — an empress descended from a Scotch merchant and an Hidalgo of the bluest blood of Spain. Near that chair thus imperially occupied, sits the Representative of the United States of America. Perhaps he is standing; but that makes no diffe
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), William the Conqueror. (search)
ing the stern persistence which can maintain itself under such circumstances? The king is dead — long live the king! Sweet William has written to the lion. Lewis Cass — at this moment, unless dead, our Secretary of State--upon terms of equality, and as one great functionary should write to another. William appears to consideary of State near him just about this time, and thus he is compelled to discard etiquette and to communicate in propria persona. He is quite pained to learn that Mr. Cass intends to prevent his return, with his companions, to his own Principality of Nicaragua. He is still more hurt to learn that there is a rumor that he designs trauding William up with a round turn; to tell him that, politically, he is a humbug, and that, practically, he is a felon. Any disreputable corsair can write to Mr. Cass. Gentlemen of a burglarious turn of mind, sent to a seclusion from this wicked world, may open a correspondence with Mr. Secretary. Pens, ink, paper, three-pen
151 Russell, William H158, 187 Repudiation of Northern Debts162 Red Bill, a New Orleans Patriarch318 Romilly, Sir Samuel828 Robertson, Dr., on Slavery803 Screws, Benjamin, Negro Broker8, 88 Society for Promoting National Unity186 Stevens, Alexander H148 Secession, The Ordinance of178 Slidell, Miss204 Secessionists, The Dissensions of219 St. Domingo, The Argument from326 Saulsbury, Senator334, 351 Tyler, John, his Diagnosis128 Times, The London158, 177, 309, 366, 374 Toombs, General, his Trials269 Thirty-Five, The Council of273 Taliaferro, Mr., his Defalcation316 Thugs in New Orleans318 University, a Southern Wanted61 Utopia, A. Slaveholding300 Van Buren, John44 Virginia, Democracy in185 Wise, Henry A.2, 95, 135, 155 Walker, William, his Letter to General Cass33, 35 Winslow, Hubbard136 Williams, Commander206 Winthrop, Robert C.248 Wood, Benjamin379, 383 Yeadon, Richard8 Young, Brigham358, 392