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, driving in our pickets. The next morning the summit of the Big Sewell was whitened with his tents, and skirmishing commenced and continued till the evening. On our side two gun detachments of the artillery and three companies of the Second regiment of the Legion, of which Col. Henningsen is colonel, but in consequence of his having charge of the infantry and artillery, under the immediate command of Lieut.-Col. Frank Anderson--who distinguished himself by the daring exploit of capturing Castillo, in Nicaragua, with forty-eight men, after Lockridge and Titus had failed with eight hundred--Capt. Imboden's, Capt. Lewis's, and Capt. Crane's University company were the companies engaged, with one six-pounder and one howitzer, under Major Gibbs, of South Carolina, Capt. McComas and Lieut. Pairo, of Richmond. The casualties were but trifling on our side, though we have to regret the death of Lieut. Howell, of Mississippi, (of Capt. McDonnell's company,) and that of one of Capt. Imboden's
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 3: Missouri, Louisiana, and California. 1850-1855. (search)
n route for California. We embarked early in March, and in seven days reached Greytown, where we united with the passengers from New York, and proceeded, by the Nicaragua River and Lake, for the Pacific Ocean. The river was low, and the little steam canal-boats, four in number, grounded often, so that the passengers had to get into the water, to help them over the bars. In all there were about six hundred passengers, of whom about sixty were women and children. In four days we reached Castillo, where there is a decided fall, passed by a short railway, and above this fall we were transferred to a larger boat, which carried us up the rest of the river, and across the beautiful lake Nicaragua, studded with volcanic islands. Landing at Virgin Bay, we rode on mules across to San Juan del Sur, where lay at anchor the propeller S. S. Lewis (Captain Partridge, I think). Passengers were carried through the surf by natives to small boats, and rowed off to the Lewis. The weather was very
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar Nuñez 1490-1560 (search)
e end of three days travel we stopped, and the next day Alonzo del Castillo set out with Estevanico, the negro, taking the two women as guidesfirst seen, having the appearance and structure of houses. Here Castillo and Estevanico arrived, and, after talking with the Indians, CastiCastillo returned at the end of three days to the spot where he had left us, and brought five or six of the people. He told us he had found fixed ing delighted us, and for it we gave infinite thanks to our Lord. Castillo told us the negro was coming with all the population to wait for ue could not cross it, which detained us fifteen days. In this time Castillo saw the buckle of a sword-belt on the neck of an Indian and stitchen had well begun to experience hunger and fatigue. I told him of Castillo and Dorantes, who were behind, 10 leagues off, with a multitude thagues. Five days having elapsed, Andres Dorantes and Alonzo del Castillo arrived with those who had been sent after them. They brought mor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
eant, Thos. Wood. Orderly Sergeant, Alex. East. Privates. Alvis, Sam. Brooks, James. Brooks, Thomas. Bransom, Jackson. Broyles, Samuel A. Caldwell, Archer. Coleman, Singleton. Coffee, Thomas. Depriest, William. Dunn, Samuel, East, William, Eads, Joe. Friedhoff, Hammond. Falwell, John. Gowin, John, Gaddess, John B. Brooks, William. Brooks, T. S. Bowman, John. Bateman, Sam. Cregg, Callahan. Cox, John. Coleman, George. Castillo, Patrick. Davidson, Benjamin. Donivan, William. Eads, Thomas. Eads, Samuel. Fletcher, Lucian. Gowin, James. Gowin, Sam. Green, Charles. Goolsby, Joshua. Goolsby, Louis. Hyman, Henry. Hughes, James. Johnson, Thomas, Kersey, William. Kinlock, William. Lynch, John. Layne, Wm. Milstead, Frank. Manning, John. Norvell, George. Purdue, Josiah. Phelps William. Roach, William. Rider, Isaiah. Robinson, James. Richey, James.
have already published of the massacre at Guadalajara. Among other things, it is said that a mine was spring upon the Liberals, in their assault upon the city, and five hundred of their number were instantly killed. So far, however, from arresting their progress, this only infuriated them the more, and forcing their way in by six different breaches at the same time, they bayonetted the enemy at their works and slaughtered all who stood in their way. The execution of the opposing General, Castillo and his officers, is doubtless to be attributed to this infuriated spirit. The same writer says that Gen. Marquez, at the head of some 4,000 to 5,000 Reactionary troops, had occupied Queretaro. He adds that before the evacuation of the town by the Liberals, they seized all the church plate they could lay their hands on, from which they realized something like $100,000. At the city of Mexico, no actual change had taken place up to the 20th, or latest date, but it was generally believed at
arrived at New Orleans, with Vera Cruz dates to the 21st.--She brings intelligence that, after a five weeks siege, the city of Guadalajara has at length fallen, and is now garrisoned by Liberal forces. The capitulation was concluded between General Castillo, as the friend of the Church party, and Gen. Zaragoza, Commander-in-Chief of the Liberal forces, the conditions of which, however, were broken by the former, who fled towards Tepic, followed by Generals Woll and Espejo, whose troops at once nd presented with new uniforms by the inhabitants. It appears that the battle, decisive of the fate of Guadalajara, took place actually about two leagues from that city. There the relieving army under Gen. Marquez and a detachment under Gen. Castillo, numbering in all some 10,000 men, were met, attacked and utterly routed by the Liberals under Gen. Zaragoza, so that very few ever found their way back again to the city. The Generals only escaped with their lives, leaving fifty pieces of a
The Civil war in Mexico. --The Rio Grande Sentinel, summing up the latest news from Mexico, says: The fall of Guadalajara and the incorporation of the forces of Gen.Castillo with those of the Liberal army, and the subsequent defeat of Gen.Marquez, leave but little doubt of the success of the defenders of the Constitution of 1857. From the most reliable accounts, the Constitutional or Liberal army now numbers 20,000 men, with 160 pieces of artillery.--The whole of the force was, at last accounts, concentrating around the city of Mexico, the only point now left in possession of Miramon, who was confined to the capital, while his enemies had advanced to the very environs of the city. Great circumspection is necessary now that the victory has perched upon the Liberal banners, or the very readjusting the machinery of government may, and doubtless will, be the occasion of new discords and contentions. We look with some anxiety for the news from the interior. The forces r
From Peru. New York, Dec. 14 --The steamer Star of the West, from Aspinwall, has arrived. The Peruvian Congress had granted extra-ordinary powers to the President for war on Bolivia. Castillo would raise 30,000 men. It was the general impression, according to a Lima letter, that the Peruvians would be whipped.
Petty Offenders. --Certain free negroes, giving their names as Samuel Gains, Jim Moore Richard Ballantine, Moses Redman, and Pleasant Castillo, were before the Mayor on Saturday for the non-payment of their taxes and vagrancy, and were sent to jail.--Jim slave of Isaac Walker, was punished for staying away from home.--Sarah Hall, white, was sent to jail as a vagrant.
ared, driving in our pickets. The next morning the summit of the Big Sewell was whitened with his tents, and skirmishing commenced and continued till the evening. On our side two gun detachments of the artillery and three companies of the 2d Regiment of the Legion, of which Col. Henningsen is Colonel, (but in consequence of his having charge of the infantry and artillery under the immediate command of Lieut.-Col. Frank Anderson, who distinguished himself by the daring exploit of capturing Castillo in Nicaragua, with 45 men, after Lockbridge and Titus had failed with 800.) Capt. Imboden's, Capt. Lewis's, and Capt. Crane's University company were the companies engaged, with one six-pounder and one howitzer, under Major Gibbes, of South Carolina, Capt. McComas and Lieut. Pairo, of Richmond. The casualties were trifling on our side, though we have to regret the death of Lieut. Howell, of Mississippi, of Capt. McDonnell's company, and that of one of Capt. Imboden's gallant Rangers.
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