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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 30 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Depew, Chauncey Mitchell, 1834- (search)
t of the people, the folly of its enemies, and the noble courage of its friends, gave to liberty, after ages of defeat, of trial, of experiment, of partial success and substantial gains, this immortal victory. Henceforth it had a refuge and recruiting station. The oppressed found free homes in this favored land, and invisible armies marched from it by mail and telegraph, by speech and song, by precept and example, to regenerate the world. Puritans in New England, Dutchmen in New York, Catholics in Maryland, Huguenots in South Carolina, had felt the fires of persecution and were wedded to religious liberty. They had been purified in the furnace, and in high debate and on bloody battle-fields had learned to sacrifice all material interests and to peril their lives for human rights. The principles of constitutional government had been impressed upon them by hundreds of years of struggle, and for each principle they could point to the grave of an ancestor whose death attested the f
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Amsterdam. (search)
sk him what was his creed or nation, but only, Do you want a lot and to become a citizen? The Hollanders had more enlarged views of the rights of conscience than any other people at that time. New, like old, Amsterdam became quite a cosmopolitan town. Of the latter, Andrew Marvell quaintly wrote: Hence Amsterdam, Turk, Christian, pagan, Jew, Staple of sects and mint of schism grew; That bank of conscience where not one so strange. Opinion but finds credit and exchange; In vain for Catholics ourselves we bear— The Universal Church is only there. When New Amsterdam was surrendered to the English (1664) it contained more than 300 houses and about 1,500 people. On the return of Governor Stuyvesant from his expedition against the Swedes on the Delaware he found the people of his capital in the wildest confusion. Van Dyck, a former civil officer, detected a squaw stealing peaches from his garden and killed her. The fury of her tribe was kindled, and the long peace of ten years
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Religion. (search)
64,600    Seventh Day 119 1158,991    Freewill 1,619 1,48685,109    General 450 55028,000    Separate 113 103 6,479 Brethren in Christ (River) 152 78 4,000 Catholics:    Roman Catholics 11,63612,0628,610,226 Independent Catholics:    Polish branch 191815,000    Old Catholic 6510,000 Catholics: Reformed661,500 ChristiansCatholics:    Polish branch 191815,000    Old Catholic 6510,000 Catholics: Reformed661,500 Christians1,2481,520111,835 Christian Catholic (Dowie)555040,000 Christian Scientists12,0006001,000,000 Church of God 46058038,000 Church of the New Jerusalem 1431737,679 Congregationalists 5,6145,604629,874 Disciples of Christ 6,52810,5281,149,982 Dunkards:    German Baptists (Conservative) 2,612 85095,000    German Baptists (Old OCatholics: Reformed661,500 Christians1,2481,520111,835 Christian Catholic (Dowie)555040,000 Christian Scientists12,0006001,000,000 Church of God 46058038,000 Church of the New Jerusalem 1431737,679 Congregationalists 5,6145,604629,874 Disciples of Christ 6,52810,5281,149,982 Dunkards:    German Baptists (Conservative) 2,612 85095,000    German Baptists (Old Order)150100 3,500    German Baptists (Progressive)23117312,787 Episcopalians:    Protestant Episcopal4,9616,686 716,431    Reformed Episcopal103104 9,743 Evangelical Bodies:    Evangelical Association1,0521,806 118,865    United Evangelical Church 478985 60,993 Friends: Ort
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ribault, Jean 1520- (search)
ollowing soon afterwards. The latter were betrayed by a sailor, and fell into the hands of Menendez. The captives pleaded for mercy. Menendez asked, Are you Catholics or Lutherans? They answered, We are all of the reformed religion. He told them he was ordered to exterminate all of that faith. They offered him 50,000 ducabound with their hands behind them. When all were gathered in this plight they were marched to a spot a short distance off, when they were again asked. Are you Catholics or Lutherans? A dozen who professed to be Catholics, and four others who were mechanics, useful to the Spaniards, were led aside. The remainder, helpless, wereCatholics, and four others who were mechanics, useful to the Spaniards, were led aside. The remainder, helpless, were butchered without mercy. Very soon after this treacherous massacre Ribault, with the rest of his followers, reached the spot where their companions had been betrayed a few hours before. Menendez hurried back, and by the same treacherous method disarmed Ribault and his friends. Ribault was shown the pile of unburied corpses of h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taney, Roger Brooke 1777-1864 (search)
Taney, Roger Brooke 1777-1864 Jurist; born in Calvert county, Md., March 17, 1777; graduated at Dickinson College in 1795; admitted to the bar in 1799. He was of a family of English Roman Catholics who settled in Maryland. At the age of twenty-three he was a member of the Maryland Assembly; was State Senator in 1816, and attorney-general of Maryland in 1827. In 1831 President Jackson appointed him United States Attorney-General, and in 1836 he was appointed chief-justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, to succeed Judge Marshall. In 1857 he gave his famous opinion in the Dred Scott case (q. v.), and was an earnest upholder of the slave-system. He died in Washington, D. C., Oct. 12, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
(Ku-klux act)......April 20, 1871 Branch mint at Dahlonega, Ga., conveyed to trustees of the North Georgia Agricultural College for educational purposes, by act......April 20, 1871 First session adjourns......April 20, 1871 Under call, dated April 20, Senate meets in special session......May 10, 1871 Extra session of Senate adjourns sine die......May 27, 1871 Hall's Arctic expedition sails from New York......June 29, 1871 Riot in New York City between Irish Orangemen and Catholics.......July 12, 1871 First narrow-gauge (3 feet) locomotive built in the United States shipped from Philadelphia for the Denver and Rio Grande railroad......July 13, 1871 Tweed ring frauds first exposed in the New York Times......July 22, 1871 Political disturbance in Louisiana begins......Aug. 8, 1871 National Labor Congress held in St. Louis......Aug. 10, 1871 Mass-meeting in New York held to consider the Tweed ring frauds; committee of seventy appointed......Sept. 4, 1871
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wise, Henry Alexander 1806-1876 (search)
rike at the very equality of citizenship, or allow him to enjoy all its lawful privileges? If Catholics and naturalized citizens are to be citizens and yet to be proscribed from office, they must beommunity, if it be a Know-nothing community, on every other subject except that of proscribing Catholics and naturalized citizens; and candidate B may concur with the community on the subject of thisthem free. How unlike to this is Know-nothingism, sitting and brooding in secret to proscribe Catholics and naturalized citizens! Protestantism protested against secrecy, it protested against shuttgnores all knowledge. And its proscription can't arrest itself within the limit of excluding Catholics and naturalized citizens. It must proscribe natives and Protestants, both, who will not consent to unite in proscribing Catholics and naturalized citizens. Nor is that all; it must not only apply to birth and religion, it must necessarily extend itself to the business of life as well as to