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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 109 1 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 84 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 33 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 23 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier. You can also browse the collection for William Ellery Channing or search for William Ellery Channing in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 6: a division in the ranks (search)
s differed from Garrison and his more intimate followers in the view they took of the Rev. Dr. William Ellery Channing, to whom Whittier had written, of his own impulse, in early youth, a serious appeetter to be written by a shy Quaker youth of twenty-six to a man more than twice his years, for Channing was then almost fifty-four. A yet unknown man, Whittier was offering counsel to the most popular clergyman in Boston. Written in 1834, the letter long preceded Channing's Faneuil Hall speech of 1837, which first clearly committed him to the antislavery movement; and it still farther precedednds of the more moderate, its recognised leader. The fact is the more interesting, inasmuch as Channing himself, in spite of his vast influence with a class whom Garrison had as yet scarcely touched,ourage, nor firmness. Whittier, on the other hand, always maintained, that after Mrs. Child, Dr. Channing had made greater sacrifices for the antislavery cause than any one, in view of the height and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 7: Whittier as a social reformer (search)
s own eyes! It was finally decided to have a president. Then came on a discussion about the Sabbath, in which Garrison and two transcendental Unitarians, and a woman by the name of Folsom, argued that every day should be held sacred; that it was not a rest from labour but from sin that was wanted; that keeping First day as holy was not required, etc. On the other hand, Amos A. Phelps, Dr. Osgood, and some others contended for the Calvinistic and generally received views of the subject. Dr. Channing, John Pierpont, and many other distinguished men were present, but took no part in the discussions. No Friends were members of the convention, although there were several lookers-on. Judging from the little I saw and heard, I do not think the world will be much the wiser for the debate. It may have a tendency to unsettle some minds. Pickard, I. 266-67. It was in connection with The Tent on the beach that Whittier printed in the New York Nation what is perhaps the best statement
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 8: personal qualities (search)
aded the audience, that they might catch every word, the poet quickly replied, Don't thee think they would have listened just as attentively if Balaam's animal had spoken? The element of humour, which early showed itself in Whittier, was undoubtedly one influence which counteracted whatever element of narrowness was to be derived from his Quaker training. One sees how a fine mind may be limited in influence through the want of humour when considering such a case as that of the Rev. Dr. William Ellery Channing, for instance, whose writings, otherwise powerful, have gradually diminished in influence through such a deficiency. Possibly even Tufts and Burroughs may have been in some degree useful in their post-mortem career, by helping to cultivate this trait in the young poet. That he read Sterne and Swift with enjoyment, we know. There is little evidence, however, that his early writings showed any trace of this gift. The dozen poems which he had written at eighteen, and the ni
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
W., 126, 179; quoted about Whittier and Amesbury strike, 87,88; quoted about Whittier and spiritualism, 127. Century Magazine, mentioned, 137. Channing, Rev. Dr., William Ellery, 81, 103; Whittier writes to, 75; his position on antislavery question, 76. Chapman, Maria Weston, 71, 72, 81; her view of Whittier, 67; of ChannChanning, 76. Charbonnier, J. D., his letter to. Whittier, 167; Whittier's letter to, 167, 168. Chardon Street Chapel, Boston, 81. Chase, G. W., his History of Haverhill, quoted, 56, 57. Chatterton, Thomas, 24. Chaucer, Geoffrey, 141. Child, Mrs., Lydia Maria, 75, 76; her account of Thompson mob, 59-61; Whittier's lett64; memorial of mob period, 65; a leader of the Disunionists, 68; Garrison's tribute to, 72; his tribute to Garrison, 72-75; differs from Garrison, 75; writes to Channing, 75; first edition of poems, 76; moves to Amesbury, 77; service to freedom, 77; Quaker principle, 78; interest in reform, 80; his Tent on the beach, 81, 82; his