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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 82 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 62 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 44 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 25 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 14 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 13 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Rufus Choate or search for Rufus Choate in all documents.

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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 6 (search)
not last long. [Loud cheers.] Courts that sit behind chains seldom sit more than once [Renewed cheering.] [A Voice: The Whigs defend it. ] O, I know that Mr. Choate has been here,--I heard him, and before a Whig caucus, defend the policy of the Fugitive Slave Bill. He told us, while I sat in yonder gallery, of the infamousndence and the Sermon on the Mount deduced the duty of immediate emancipation. The sentiment was received, I am thankful to say, with a solemn silence, though Rufus Choate uttered it to an assembly of Webster Whigs. I heard it said to-day, that the Abolitionists had done nothing, because a fugitive, within the last twelve months not unworthily, for more than thirty years. I came here again last fall,--the first time I had been here, in a Whig meeting, since listening to Otis. I found Rufus Choate on the platform. Compared with the calm grace and dignity of Otis, the thought of which came rushing back, he struck me like a monkey in convulsions. [Roars
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 9 (search)
f the bench, and abuse your power, if you exercise it in any case but a clear violation of law. This is a practical annihilation of the power. This claim loses sight of the very nature and intent of the power, which is well stated by Mr. Austin, when he says that a judge who has lost the confidence of the community ought to be removed, though you can prove no specific charges against him,--though he may have violated no law, written or unwritten. Or, in words said to have been used by Mr. Rufus Choate in a recent case, A judicial officer may be removed if found intellectually incapable, or if he has been left to commit some great enormity, so as to show himself morally deranged. This unlimited power, then, Gentlemen, is one that you undoubtedly possess. It is one that the people deliberately planned and intended that you should possess. It is one which the nature of the government makes it necessary you should possess, and that, on fitting occasion, you should have the courage
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
een in every one's mouth of late, and men have exhausted language in trying to express their admiration and their respect. The courts have covered the grave of Mr. Choate with eulogy. Let us see what is their idea of a great lawyer. We are told that he worked hard, he never neglected his client, he flung over the discussions ofs on the religious and moral elevation, and the glorious and high purposes which crowned his life! Nothing of this now! I forget. Mr. Hallett did testify for Mr. Choate's religion [laughter and applause]; but the law maxim is, that a witness should be trusted only in matters he understands, and that evidence, therefore, amountsof the empire. And that is Erskine, whose eloquence, spite of Lord Eldon and George III., made it safe to speak and to print. Then New England shouts, This is Choate, who made it safe to murder; and of whose health thieves asked before hey began to steal. Boston had a lawyer once, worthy to stand in that Pantheon; one whose
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
,] and in a year or two it got beyond that. Mississippi published a report from her Senate, in which she went a stride further, and described it as economic subordination, and baptized it by statute warranteeism. [Renewed laughter.] A Southern Methodist bishop was taken to task for holding slaves in reality, but his Methodist brethren were not courageous enough to say slaves right out in meeting, and so they advised the bishop to get rid of his impediment [loud laughter]; and the late Mr. Rufus Choate, in the last Democratic canvass of my own State, undertaking and obliged to refer to the institutions of the South, and unwilling that his old New England lips, which had spoken so many glorious free truths, should foul their last days with the hated word, phrased it a different type of industry. Now, hypocrisy — why, it is the homage that Vice renders to Virtue. When men begin to weary of capital punishment, they banish the gallows inside the jail-yard, and let nobody see it without