Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Jesus Christ or search for Jesus Christ in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Roman Catholic Church. (search)
the far-reaching acts like the refusal to condemn the association of the Knights of Labor. His encyclical on the condition of workingmen recalls the only possible lines of a final concord between labor and capital —the spirit and teachings of Jesus Christ, the best Friend our common humanity ever had. In the same way, his latest encyclical on Jesus Christ, with which the religious history of the century closes, emphasizes the true basis for the restoration of peace and harmony and justice betweJesus Christ, with which the religious history of the century closes, emphasizes the true basis for the restoration of peace and harmony and justice between the poor and the rich, between the producers of capital and the capital that stimulates and regulates production. We may be confident that the papacy of the future will not show less enlightenment and sympathy in its attempts to solve these delicate and grave problems with the least injustice and the greatest charity. It would be idle to deny or to palliate the many shadows that fall across the history of Catholicism in the century that has elapsed. I scarcely need refer to the weaknesse
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St. Andrew, Brotherhood of (search)
Andrew, Brotherhood of An organization of men in the Protestant Episcopal Church. Its sole object is the spread of Christ's kingdom among men. It works under two rules, known as (1) The Rule of Prayer: To pray daily for the spread of Christ's Christ's kingdom among men, and that Christ's blessing may be upon the labors of the Brotherhood; and (2) The Rule of Service: To make an earnest effort each week to bring at least one man within the hearing of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. The Brotherhood sChrist's blessing may be upon the labors of the Brotherhood; and (2) The Rule of Service: To make an earnest effort each week to bring at least one man within the hearing of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. The Brotherhood started in St. James's Church, Chicago, on St. Andrew's Day, 1883. It takes its name from the apostle who, when he had found the Messiah, first found his own brother Simon and brought him to Jesus. This Brotherhood in St. James's parish was started Jesus Christ. The Brotherhood started in St. James's Church, Chicago, on St. Andrew's Day, 1883. It takes its name from the apostle who, when he had found the Messiah, first found his own brother Simon and brought him to Jesus. This Brotherhood in St. James's parish was started simply as a parochial organization, with no thought of its extending beyond the limits of the parish. Its work, however, was so successful in bringing men to church that attention was called to it, and other brotherhoods, having the same objects A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Slavery. (search)
rievance, and even Whitefield advocated the introduction of slavery, under the old (and later) pretence of propagating, in that way, Christianity among the heathen Africans. Habersham, too, advocated the introduction. Many of the poor slaves in America, he wrote, have already been made freemen of the heavenly Jerusalem. The Germans were assured by their friends in Germany of its harmlessness. Word came to them in 1749: If you take slaves in faith and with the intent of conducting them to Christ, the action will not be a sin, but may prove a benediction. So it was that avarice subdued conscience. Already slaves had been introduced into Georgia from South Carolina as hired servants, under indentures for life, or for ninety-nine years; and at Savannah the continual toast was, The one thing needful, which meant negro slaves. Leading men among the Scotch and Germans who opposed the introduction of slavery were threatened and persecuted. Under great pressure, the trustees yielded,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Socialism, (search)
-72), and Charles Kingsley (1819-75), two English clergymen, advocated a large extension of the system of co-operation. The work begun by them is carried on on more extended lines by Christian socialism, which claims to be the result of applying Christ's teaching to national, social, and commercial life, and not merely to personal conduct. Those who hold this view maintain that Christ said little as to a future state, but much of bettering the conditions of life in this world. They point out Christ said little as to a future state, but much of bettering the conditions of life in this world. They point out that he consistently placed the community before the individual, and taught that the foundation of society is brotherhood, not competition for profit, as now with us. Christian Socialists adopt that name because they believe that a really Christian society must be what is called socialistic. Scientific socialism embraces: 1. Collectivism: An ideal socialistic state of society, in which the functions of the government will include the organization of all the industries of the country. In a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Toleration acts. (search)
, adopted the declaration that whereas the enforcing of conscience in matters of religion hath frequently fallen out to be of dangerous consequence in those commonwealths where it has been practised, and for the more quiet and peaceable government of this province, and the better to preserve mutual love and unity among the inhabitants, . . . no person or persons whatsoever within this province, or the islands, posts, harbors, creeks, or havens thereunto belonging, professing to believe in Jesus Christ, shall from henceforth be anyways troubled or molested or discountenanced for or in respect of his or her religion, nor in the free exercise thereof, within the province or the islands thereunto belonging, nor any way compelled to the belief or exercise of any other religion against his or her conscience. This was an outgrowth of English statutes. On Oct. 27, 1645, the English House of Commons ordered that the inhabitants of the Bermudas, and of all other American plantations now or her
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), To-mo-chi-chi, 1642- (search)
with the King, arrayed in brilliant English costume—the Creek monarch and his queen in scarlet and gold. He made a speech to King George and gave him a bunch of eagle's feathers, to which a gracious reply was made assuring the Indians of English protection. They remained four months in England, during which time a brother of the Indian queen died of small-pox. The company were conveyed to the place of embarkation in the royal coaches, with presents valued at $2,000; and the Prince of Wales gave To-mo-chi-chi's heir a gold watch, with an injunction to call upon Jesus Christ every morning when he looked at it. They reached Savannah late in December, 1734. To-mo-chi-chi died Oct. 5, 1739. At his funeral minute-guns were fired at the battery at Savannah, and musketry was discharged. He was buried in the centre of the town, and Oglethorpe ordered a pyramid of stone to be erected over his grave. The funeral was attended by the magistrates and people of Savannah and a train of Indian
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Unitarians, (search)
Unitarians, Frequently termed Socinians from Laelius Socinus, who founded a sect in Italy about 1546. In America Dr. James Freeman, of King's Chapel, Boston, in 1783, removed from the Prayer book of common prayers all reference to the Trinity or Deity and worship of Christ; his church became distinctly Unitarian in 1787. In 1801 the Plymouth Church declared itself Unitarian. Dr. William Ellery Channing (1780-1842) was the acknowledged head of this church until his death. The American Unitarian association was formed May 24, 1825; headquarters at Boston, Mass. The Western conference organized 1852, and a national Unitarian conference at New York City, April 5, 1865. Reports for 1900 showed: 550 ministers, 459 churches, and 71,000 members.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United brethren in Christ, (search)
United brethren in Christ, A religious sect established in the United States by William Otterbein, a missionary of the German Reformed Church, and Martin Bohm. The first meeeting was held in 1789 in Baltimore, Md., but it was not known by its present name till 1800. The first general conference was held in 1815, when rules of order and a confession of faith were adopted. The principal additions have been made in Pennsylvania and in the Northwest. In 1900 the official report showed: Ministers, 1,897; churches, 4,229; members, 243,841.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United brethren in Christ, old Constitution (search)
United brethren in Christ, old Constitution A religious body formerly a part of the United brethren in Christ (q. v.), but owing to an act of the general conference in 1885 appointing a commission to revise the Confession of Faith, Bishop Milton Wright and eleven delegates who opposed the measure withdrew and formed an independent organization. In 1900 the official reports showed: Ministers, 670; churches, 817; members, 226,043.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indian Territory, (search)
ber of the tribe......April 23, 1897 Banking. In 1900 there were thirty-three national banks in operation, having $1,400,630 in capital, $482,970 in outstanding circulation, and $437,500 in United States bonds. There were also thirty-one State banks, with $473,833 capital, and $44,051 surplus; and three private banks, with $80,000 capital. Churches and education. The strongest denominations in the Territory are the Methodist Episcopal, South; regular Baptist, South; Disciples of Christ; Presbyterian, North; Roman Catholic; Cumberland Presbyterian; Church of God; and African Methodist. In 1899 there were 387 Evangelical Sunday-schools, with 2,942 officers and teachers, and 16,393 scholars. There are no general school statistics, but the Five Nations, the United States government, and religious societies support over 400 schools. There were in 1899 four public high and ten private secondary schools, the Indian University at Bacone, and Henry Kendall College at Muscogee.
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