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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 38 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 4 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
On August 5th Bragg sent two of his brigades (Cleburne's and Preston Smith's) to General Smith at Knoxville. General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine thousand men, was ordered to watch the Federal General G. W. Morgan, who occupied Cumberland Gap. General Smith started on the 14th en route to Rogers's Gap, with 4 brigades, 6000 strong. The brigades of Preston Smith and B. J. Hill were commanded by General P. R. Cleburne, and the brigades of McCray and McNair were under command of General T. J. Churchill. General Henry Heth, with a force nearly 4000 strong, was ordered to march direct to Barboursville by way of Big Creek Gap, and the army was preceded by 900 cavalry under Colonel John S. Scott. General Smith had at first contemplated cutting off the supplies of the garrison at Cumberland Gap, but learning that they were well provisioned, and seeing the difficulty of supplying his own troops in the poor and barren region of south-eastern Kentucky, he determined to push rapidly on to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
bore the brunt of the battle, known as the battle of Prairie Grove. Hindman sheltered his demoralized Brigadier-General T. J. Churchill, C. S. A., from a photograph. army behind the Arkansas, opposite Van Buren, and tried to reorganize it. It th he disembarked his men the next day. The garrison consisted of about five thousand men under command of Brigadier-General Thos. J. Churchill. The iron-clads began the attack on the 10th. It was renewed the next day by both army and navy, and after a terrific bombardment of nearly four hours Churchill surrendered. The Confederate loss was 60 killed, 75 or 80 wounded, and 4791 prisoners; the Union loss was 1061 killed and wounded. The next day MeClernand received peremptory orders from Graic activity, the main object of which was to procure forage for their horses. A division of infantry — consisting of Churchill's Arkansas brigade and Parsons's Missouri brigade, the two having some five thousand effectives — was near Spring Hill.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. (search)
nd 29 missing =1061. The strength of McClernand's expeditionary force was about 32,000 infantry, 1000 cavalry, and 40 or more pieces of artillery. (See Official Records, Vol. XVII., Pt. II., p. 553.) The Confederate forces.--Brigadier-General Thomas J. Churchill. First Brigade, Col. Robert R. Garland: 6th Tex., Lieut.-Col. T. S. Anderson; 24th Tex. Cav. (dismounted), Col. F. C. Wilkes; 25th Tex, Cav. (dismounted), Col. C. C. Gillespie; Ark. Battery, Capt. William Hart; La. Cav., Capt. lete), Col. John W. Dunnington: 19th Ark., Lieut.-Col. A. S. Hutchinson. Miscellaneous: 24th Ark. (detachment), Col. E. E. Portlock, Jr.; Tex. Cav., Capt. Alfred Johnson; La. Cav., Capt. L. M. Nutt; Tex. Cav., Capt. Samuel J. Richardson. General Churchill says ( Official Records, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., p. 782): My loss will not exceed 60 killed and 75 or 80 wounded. He also states (ibid, p. 780) that the whole force under his command numbered about 3000 effective men. General McClernand (ibid
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
dman was a square bastioned work, standing at a bend of the river, sufficiently high to command the surrounding country. It was commanded by Lieutenant Dunnington, who had done such good service at St. Charles, and defended by troops under General Churchill. On the side facing the river were three casemates, two of them at the angles containing each a 9-inch gun, and the intermediate one an 8-inch. On the opposite side the approaches were defended by a line of trenches a mile in length, beginCincinnati, being reduced to a complete wreck. At the same time the troops gradually advanced, and were just preparing for a final assault, when white flags were run up all along the works. Lieutenant Dunnington surrendered to Porter, and General Churchill to McClernand. On the 30th of January Grant assumed command of the army before Vicks-burg. The enemy's right flank rested on the Yazoo Valley, a vast tract of partly overflowed country, oval in shape, two hundred miles long, and interse
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Hood's second sortie at Atlanta. (search)
r alignments; but the iron and leaden hail that was poured upon them was too much for flesh and blood to stand, and before reaching the center of the open fields the columns were broken and thrown into great confusion. Taking advantage of this, a portion of Fuller's and Sweeny's divisions, with bayonets fixed, charged the enemy and drove them back to the woods, taking many prisoners. The 81st Ohio (Colonel Adams) charged first, then the 39th Ohio (Colonel McDowell) and the 27th Ohio (Colonel Churchill). General McPherson's admiration Battle of Atlanta, July 22--recapture from the Confederates of De Gress's Battery. I: the view is west toward Atlanta; the Confederates in capturing the Battery charged along the Georgia railroad from the rolling-mill [see map, p. 312], and took advantage of the cover of the railroad embankment and cut. for the steadiness and determined bravery of the Sixteenth Corps was unbounded. While I was riding to find General McPherson, he had just taken
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
with Green's cavalry coming up at last, and Churchill's Arkansas division and Parsons's Missouri d wait for that, but, sending back orders for Churchill and Parsons to join him early on the morningreunite the army and the fleet. Meanwhile Churchill's and Parsons's divisions having arrived at battle of Sabine Cross-roads, Taylor ordered Churchill to march both divisions to the front at 2 A.in pursuit — Green with the cavalry leading, Churchill next with his own division under Tappan, thented by Emory and Mower in order of battle. Churchill's men were so fagged by their early start anupport, Walker on the right of the road, and Churchill, with three regiments of cavalry on his righhich he avenged a defeat. About 5 o'clock Churchill opened his attack, Parsons on the right, Tapwas outflanked and crushed. At the sound of Churchill's guns, Walker, en échelon Major-General J 9th.--R. B. I. [And see p. 370.] Walker and Churchill with most of the cavalry retreated six miles
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
P. Bee, J. P. Major, and Arthur P. Bagby. unattached cavalry: 2d La., Col. W. G. Vincent; 4th La., Col. Louis Bush. detachment of Price's Army, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. Churchill. Missouri division, Brig.-Gen. M. M. Parsons. Brigade Commanders: Brig.-Gen. John B. Clark, Jr., and Col. S. P. Burns. Arkansas division (ChurcChurchill's), Brig.-Gen. John C. Tappan. Brigade Commanders: Cols. H. L. Grinsted and L. C. Gause. artillery (attached to brigades and divisions). General Taylor says: The Army I had the honor to command in this campaign numbered, at its greatest strength, about 13,000 of all arms, including Liddell's force on the north bank of Red River; but immediately after the battle of Pleasant Hill it was reduced to 5200 by the withdrawal of Walker's and Churchill's divisions. . . . Our total loss in killed, wounded, and missing was 3976. (See p. 191, Destruction and reconstruction, D. Appleton & Co., New York.) General E. Kirby Smith, in his official repo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in Arkansas, April 20, 1864. (search)
Maxey. Gano's Brigade, Col. Charles De Morse: 29th Tex., Maj. J. A. Carroll; 30th Tex., Lieut.-Col. N. W. Battle; 31st Tex., Maj. M. Looscan; Welch's Co., Lieut. Frank M. Gano; Tex. Battery, Capt. W. B. Krumbhaar. Choctaw Brigade, Col. Tandy Walker: 1st Regiment, Lieut.-Col. James Riley; 2d Regiment, Col. Simpson W. Folsom. Walker's division, Maj.-Gen. John G. Walker. Brigade Commanders: Brig.-Gens. T . N. Waul, W. R. Scurry, and Col. Horace Randal. Arkansas division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. Churchill. Tappan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. C. Tappan: 24th and 30th Ark., Lieut.-Col. W. R. Hardy; 27th and 38th Ark., Col. R. G. Shaver; 33d Ark., Col. H. L. Grinsted. Hawthorn's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. T. Hawthorn: . . . Gause's Brigade, Col. L. C. Gause: 26th Ark., Lieut.-Col. Iverson L. Brooks; 32d Ark., Lieut.-Col. William Hicks; 36th Ark., Col. J. M. Davie. Missouri division, Brig.-Gen. M. M. Parsons. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John B. Clark, Jr.: 8th Mo., Col. Charles S. Mitche
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
dered General Price, who commanded in Arkansas, to dispatch his entire infantry, consisting of Churchill's and Parsons's divisions, to Shreveport, and General Maxey to move toward General Price, and, river at Fulton, the other direct to Shreveport. I consequently held Price's infantry, under Churchill, a few days at Shreveport. Steele's hesitation and the reports of the advance of Banks's cavalry caused me, on the 4th of April, to move Churchill to Keachie, a point twenty miles in rear of Mansfield, where the road divides to go to Marshall and Shreveport. He was directed to report to Gennt, with his accustomed boldness and vigor he pushed to a complete success. [See p. 353.] Churchill, with his infantry under Tappan and Parsons joined Taylor that night. The next morning Taylore Saline, April 30th, completed his discomfiture. [See p. 375.] He retreated to Little Rock. Churchill, Parsons, and Walker were Brigadier-General C. J. Polignac, C. S. A. From a photograph. at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
e Izard1825 to 1829 John Pope1829 to 1835 William S. Fulton1835 to 1836 State Governors of Arkansas. James S. Conway1836 to 1840 Archibald Yell1840 to 1844 Samuel Adams1844 Thomas S. Drew1844 to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadley1871 to 1872 Elisha Baxter1872 to 1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H. Berry1883 to 1885 Simon P. Hughes1885 to 1889 James P. Eagle1889 to 1893 Wm. M. Fishback1893 to 1895 James P. Clarke1895 to 1897 Daniel W. Jones1897 to 1901 Jefferson Davis1901 to---- United States Senators from the State of Arkansas. names.No. of Congress.Date. William S. Fulton24th to 28th1836 to 1844 Ambrose H. Sevier24th to 30th1836 to 1848 Chester Ashley28th to 30th1844 to 1848 Solon Borland30th to 33d1848 to 1853 Wm. K. Sebastian30th to 3
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