Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for Clark or search for Clark in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
he town. General Longstreet and his Staff at once received me into their mess, and I was introduced to Major Fairfax, Major Latrobe, and Captain Rogers of his personal Staff; also to Major Moses, the Chief Commissary, whose tent I am to share. He is the most jovial, amusing, clever son of Israel I ever had the good fortune to meet. The other officers of Longstreet's Headquarter Staff are Colonel Sorrell, Lieutenant-colonel Manning (ordnance officer), Major Walton, Captain Goree, and Major Clark, all excellent good fellows, and most hospitable. Having lived at the headquarters of all the principal Confed-erate Generals, I am able to affirm that the relation between their Staffs and themselves, and the way the duty is carried on, is very similar to what it is in the British army. All the Generals-Johnston, Bragg, Polk, Hardee, Longstreet, and Lee — are thorough soldiers, and their Staffs are composed of gentlemen of position and education, who have now been trained into excell
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, July, 1863. (search)
their plans were deranged by the events of the first. The Staff officers spoke of the battle as a certainty, and the universal feeling in the army was one of profound contempt for an enemy whom they have beaten so constantly, and under so many disadvantages. 2d July, 1863 (Thursday). We all got up at 3.30 A. M., and breakfasted a little before daylight. Lawley in sisted on riding, notwithstanding his illness. Captain -- and I were in a dilemma for horses; but I was accommodated by Major Clark (of this Staff), whilst the stout Austrian was mounted by Major Walton. The Austrian, in spite of the early hour, had shaved his cheeks and cired his mustaches as beautifully as if he was on parade at Vienna. Colonel Sorrell, the Austrian, and I arrived at 5 A. M. at the same commanding position we were on yesterday, and I climbed up a tree in company with Captain Schreibert of the Prussian army. Just below us were seated Generals Lee, Hill, Longstreet, and Hood, in consultation —