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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
teen miles. What's seventeen miles, he asked at evening, for a soldier? It had rained-poured-most of the time. I had commanded my brigade and also the advance guard. The mud was first slippery and then deep; the weather was chilly and damp, making the rests uncomfortable and the night worse, as we were without canvas shelter, yet owing to previous discipline there was none of the Bull Run straggling. Sumner's division, made up of the three brigades, and the Eighth Illinoiso Cavalry, with Clarke's and Frank's six-gun batteries of artillery, continued its march the 11th, and kept on to Manassas Junction and beyond. The Confederate cavalry leader, J. E. B. Stuart, watched our advancing forces, retiring from knoll to knoll, from grove to grove, as we pressed on. That cavalry was Johnston's rear guard, when his army was in motion southward, and became his outpost and picketing force as soon as Johnston halted. Sumner stopped his general movement at Warrenton Junction, thirteen miles s
rice of five pounds. Vizetelly at once put the volume into the hands of a friendly printer and brought it out on his own account, through the nominal agency of Clarke & Co. The 7,000 copies sold, other editions followed, and Mr. Vizetelly disposed of his interest in the book to the printer and agent, who joined with Mr. Beeton nfidently to say that the aggregate number of copies circulated in Great Britain and the colonies exceeds one and a half millions. A similar statement made by Clarke & Co. in October, 1852, reveals the following facts. It says: An early copy was sent from America the latter end of April to Mr. Bogue, the publisher, andeeable surprise to receive ten thousand dollars as the first-fruits of three months sale. I presume as much more is now due. Mr. Bosworth in England, the firm of Clarke & Co., and Mr. Bentley, have all offered me an interest in the sales of their editions in London. I am very glad of it, both on account of the value of what they
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 15: the third trip to Europe, 1859. (search)
d among them are the following, that not only throw light upon their mode of life, but illustrate a marked tendency of her mind:-- Florence, Christmas Day, 1859. My dear husband,--I wish you all a Merry Christmas, hoping to spend the next one with you. For us, we are expecting to spend this evening with quite a circle of American friends. With Scoville and Fred came L. Bacon (son of Dr. Bacon); a Mr. Porter, who is to study theology at Andover, and is now making the tour of Europe; Mr. Clarke, formerly minister at Cornwall; Mr. Jenkyns, of Lowell; Mr. and Mrs. Howard, John and Annie Howard, who came in most unexpectedly upon us last night. So we shall have quite a New England party, and shall sing Millais' Christmas hymn in great force. Hope you will all do the same in the old stone cabin. Our parlor is all trimmed with laurel and myrtle, looking like a great bower, and our mantel and table are redolent with bouquets of orange blossoms and pinks. January 16, 1860. My d
remains now, 507; his promises comfort the soul for separations by death, 486. Christian Union, contains observations by H. B. S. on spiritualism and Mr. Owen's books, 465. Christianity and spiritualism, 487. Church, the, responsible for slavery, 151. Cincinnati, Lyman Beecher accepts call to, 53; Catherine Beecher's impressions of, 54, 55; Walnut Hills and Seminary, 54, 55; famine in, 100; cholera, 119; sympathetic audience in, 498. Civil War, Mrs. Stowe on causes of, 363. Clarke & Co. on English success of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 190; offer author remuneration, 202. Clay, Henry, and his compromise, 143. Cogswell, Catherine Ledyard, schoolfriend of H. B. S., 31. College of Teachers, 79. Collins professorship, 129. Colored people, advance of, 255. Confederacy, A. H. Stephens on object of, 381. Courage and cheerfulness of H. B. S., 473. Cranch, E. P., 69. Cruikshank illustrates Uncle Tom's Cabin, 192. D. Daniel Deronda, appears in Harper's, 473;
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
ntain them all. The pulpit of the Church of the Disciples was tastefully draped in purple—in this case, more than royal mourning,—and on the table stood a bust of Sumner. Not venturing to speak at length, the address of the pastor, James freeman Clarke, was read. From it we take a few passages: The friends who have fought by his side during long years when success seemed hopeless, whose little barques have sailed attendant on his and partaken the same gales; younger men who have chosen himurderous blows, but Sumner did as much for the cause of freedom by his suffering as he had done by his speech. When the news reached Boston of that assault, a meeting was hastily called. The men who ought to have spoken were absent, and, said Mr. Clarke, I remember with some pleasure that I had the opportunity of speaking first in Boston against that cowardly, brutal, and murderous assault. But many a man who did not raise his voice in public at that time took a vow of hostility in his heart
ntain them all. The pulpit of the Church of the Disciples was tastefully draped in purple—in this case, more than royal mourning,—and on the table stood a bust of Sumner. Not venturing to speak at length, the address of the pastor, James freeman Clarke, was read. From it we take a few passages: The friends who have fought by his side during long years when success seemed hopeless, whose little barques have sailed attendant on his and partaken the same gales; younger men who have chosen himurderous blows, but Sumner did as much for the cause of freedom by his suffering as he had done by his speech. When the news reached Boston of that assault, a meeting was hastily called. The men who ought to have spoken were absent, and, said Mr. Clarke, I remember with some pleasure that I had the opportunity of speaking first in Boston against that cowardly, brutal, and murderous assault. But many a man who did not raise his voice in public at that time took a vow of hostility in his heart
ates to approach within a few rods. General Williams then gave the command: Forward! double quick! and with a deafening cheer they rushed to the charge. The shock of two such masses advancing shook the entire field. The struggle was fierce and the slaughter heavy. Four times the rebels made desperate efforts to come from among the tombs and cross the road, but were driven back each time, and finally they retreated in full panic. On our right, in the meantime, the rebels, under General Clarke, made a desperate effort to flank us and get in our rear. It was here that the admirable generalship of Williams displayed itself. Anticipating this very movement, he had placed Manning's battery of six pieces, supported by the Wisconsin and Vermont regiments, while the Michigan Regiment was strongly posted at the crossing of the roads and commanding the entire approach of the enemy's left. Here the battle raged fiercely; and after the rebels' flank movement was repulsed and driven ba
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
war, slavery, and oaths he became a convert. This was rather a case of reversion than of conversion, for the affinity between the early Friends and the Baptists was very strong (see Tallack's George Fox, the Friends and the early Baptists). One of Mr. Benson's ancestors, on the maternal side, was that Rev. Obadiah Holmes who was publicly whipt in Boston, in 1651, for holding service at the bedside of an invalid brother Baptist, and whose account of his behavior under this persecution (in Clarke's Newes from New England) shows how little he differed in spirit and in manne from the equally outraged Quakers. He cherished their spirit, dressed very much in their style, and generally [while in Providence] attended their religious meetings. Two of his daughters became Friends through convincement. Religion, philanthropy and hospitality moulded the family life at Friendship's Valley, as Prudence Crandall had gratefully denominated the Benson place, which lay on both sides of the Norwi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
f the height. In its centre, and facing the southeast, Mr. Jefferson has placed his house, which is of brick, two stories high in the wings, with a piazza in front of a receding centre. It is built, I suppose, in the French style. You enter, by a glass folding-door, into a hall which reminds you of Fielding's Man of the Mountain, by the strange furniture of its walls. On one side hang the head and horns of an elk, a deer, and a buffalo; another is covered with curiosities which Lewis and Clarke found in their wild and perilous expedition. On the third, among many other striking matters, was the head of a mammoth, or, as Cuvier calls it, a mastodon, containing the only os frontis, Mr. Jefferson tells me, that has yet been found. On the fourth side, in odd union with a fine painting of the Repentance of Saint Peter, is an Indian map on leather, of the southern waters of the Missouri, and an Indian representation of a bloody battle, handed down in their traditions. Through this h
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
me, to procure further facilities for my journey, if I should meet him on the Continent. June 29.—To-day, after some trouble, though none arising unnecessarily in the public offices, I have obtained my passport, and gone through the melancholy duty of calling on the friends who have been kind to me,—bade farewell to the loungers at Murray's literary Exchange, and called on Lord Byron, who told me that he yet hoped to meet me in America. He said he never envied any men more than Lewis and Clarke, when he read the account of their expedition. Mr. Ticknor left London on the 30th of June with the same delightful party of friends with whom he had crossed the ocean, and, crossing by Harwich, landed at Helvoetsluys. There, he says, We took the only two machines in the village,—a coach, which seemed to be without springs, and a wagon, which did not even pretend to have any,—to transport us to Rotterdam. Our road, the whole distance, went over a dyke, and some portions of it were on
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