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James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 224 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 121 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 93 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 89 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 61 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 58 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for P. R. Cleburne or search for P. R. Cleburne in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 9 document sections:

Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
's batteries. First brigade, infantry, Brig.-Gen. T. C. Hindman: Second Arkansas regiment, Lieut.-Col. Bocage; Sixth Arkansas regiment, Col. A. T. Hawthorn; Arkansas battalion, Lieut.-Col. John S. Marmaduke. Second brigade, infantry, Col. P. R. Cleburne: First Arkansas regiment, Colonel Cleburne; Fifth Arkansas regiment, Col. D. C. Cross; Seventh Mississippi regiment, Col. J. J. Thornton; Tennessee Mountain Rifles, Col. B. J. Hill. Third brigade, infantry, Col. R. G. Shaver: Seventh ArColonel Cleburne; Fifth Arkansas regiment, Col. D. C. Cross; Seventh Mississippi regiment, Col. J. J. Thornton; Tennessee Mountain Rifles, Col. B. J. Hill. Third brigade, infantry, Col. R. G. Shaver: Seventh Arkansas regiment, Colonel Shaver; Eighth Arkansas regiment, Col. W. R. Patterson; Twenty-fourth Tennessee regiment, Col. R. D. Allison; Ninth Arkansas regiment, Lieut.-Col. S. J. Mason. Second division, Brig.-Gen. S. B. Buckner. Cavalry: First Kentucky regiment, Col. Ben Hardin Helm; Tennessee regiment, Maj. J. J. Cox. Artillery: Lyon's and Porter's batteries. First brigade, infantry, Col. Roger W. Hanson: Hanson's, Thompson's, Trabue's, Hunt's, Lewis' and Cofer's Kentucky regiments.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
f the Federal army from Bowling Green appeared at Edgefield on the north side of the Cumberland. A deputation of the citizens, with the mayor, went out to negotiate, and on the 25th the formal surrender of the city to General Buell took place. On the 23d of February, the organization of General Johnston's forces being completed at Murfreesboro, he issued an order announcing the reorganization of the army and assuming command. It consisted of Hardee's division, composed of Hindman's and Cleburne's brigades; Crittenden's division, of Carroll's and Statham's brigades; Pillow's division, of Wood's and Bowen's brigades; and the Reserve under Gen. John C. Breckinridge. This latter comprised the following commands: Third Kentucky, Col. A. P. Thompson; Fourth Kentucky, Col. R. P. Trabue; Fifth Kentucky (afterward called the Ninth), Col. Thomas H. Hunt; Sixth Kentucky, Col. Joseph H. Lewis; Col. Crew's regiment, Clifton's battalion, Hale's battalion, Helm's cavalry battalion, Morgan's squ
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
9th of August General Bragg added to General Smith's command from his own, the brigades of Generals Cleburne and Preston Smith, forming temporarily a fourth division under Cleburne, and also Gen. T. Cleburne, and also Gen. T. J. Churchill's division, including the brigades of McCray and McNair, constituting the third division of General Smith's army. On the 9th, General Smith, in a letter to General Bragg, says that froning his plan for entering Kentucky, which was substantially that executed by him—that he, with Cleburne's division, would cross the mountains by two routes, moving by Rogers' Gap, while Heth would pu Davis of the 11th, crossed the Cumberland mountains through Rogers' Gap, with the divisions of Cleburne and Churchill 6,000 strong, and on the 18th reached Barboursville, Ky., while General Heth, constimated by General Smith at 10,000. The principal fighting was done by the Confederates under Cleburne and Churchill, Scott's cavalry having been sent to the rear of Richmond. Upon the final rout o
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
r. Out of 15,000 of all arms, the Confederate loss was 3,396—510 killed, 2,635 wounded and 251 missing. The total Federal casualties were 4,241—845 killed, 2,851 wounded and 515 missing. General Halleck states that General Buell had at Louisville 100,000 men; but the latter in his report gives his whole force which left Louisville as 58,000, including cavalry and artillery, his three corps being about equal in number, say 18,000 each. The Confederates lost no general officers, but Generals P. R. Cleburne, S. A. M. Wood and John C. Brown, commanding brigades, were wounded. One of the most remarkable features of the battle is that General Buell in his report says he did not know that a battle was being fought until 4:30 o'clock, over two hours after it began. General Buell's statement in review of the evidence before the Military Commission. Rebellion Records, Vol. XVI, Part x, page 51. General McCook's testimony, Ib., page 90. About midnight the Confederate army was withdra
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
y company, Capt. R. E. Roberts. General Buckner's division consisted of four brigades, commanded by Generals Liddell, Cleburne, Bushrod R. Johnson and Wood. Of the cavalry is given as among independent organizations, One brigade of 2,500 men, Coorm first line in Polk's corps; Cheatham's the second line; Breckinridge's division will form first line Hardee's corps, Cleburne's division second line Hardee's corps. 4. McCown's division to form reserve opposite center on high ground in rear ofs had been in line three days and nights, General Bragg determined to attack on the morning of the 31st. With that view Cleburne's (late Buckner's) division was moved on the night of the 30th to the extreme left, General Hardee accompanying with insohn Bradford, Main street, 1799. with its left swung out in alternate fields and cedar brakes upon ground nearly level. Cleburne had struck Gen. A. D. McCook's corps, the same which suffered so from Cheatham's assault at Perryville, while the men we
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
ed for the great battle of the next day. General Breckinridge crossed the river and at daylight was placed on the extreme right, his left resting on the right of Cleburne's division. General Polk was in command of the right wing, consisting of his own and Hill's corps; and General Longstreet of the left, composed of his own and B the thick forest of small trees parallel to our line, so located as not to be discernible until closely approached. These works covered Breckinridge's left and Cleburne's right. The break of day found the two armies in lines of nearly equal length, the Federals near and a little in front of the main Chattanooga road, McCook's cards east of them. It had been Bragg's intention to attack early in the morning, but there was delay in perfecting his dispositions on the right in support of Cleburne, and to his left, and it was not until half-past 9 that the advance was made. The thick woods and generally level nature of the ground prevented the use of much
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
alry: Thomas G. Woodward, Captain, August 25, 1862. (Afterwards known as Woodward's regiment: Woodward, Colonel—T. W. Lewis, Major ) Independent Company Kentucky cavalry: James M. Bolin, Captain, November 21, 1861. King's Cavalry Battalion: H. Clay King, Major. Independent Company Kentucky cavalry: J. J. Murphay, Captain. Morehead's Partisan Rangers: J. C. Morehead, Colonel. Patton's Partisan Rangers: Oliver A. Patton, Lieutenant-Colonel. Buckner Guards (assigned to Gen. P. R. Cleburne's Division): Culvin F. Sanders, Captain. Company of Kentucky Partisan Rangers: William J. Fields, Captain, August 1, 1862. Company of Kentucky Partisan Rangers: Phil M. Victor, Captain. There were other organizations composed in whole or in part of Kentuckians of which there is no official record; as Byrne's battery of artillery, which though first organized in Mississippi, was composed of and officered by Kentuckians almost exclusively, and won distinction in the service, be
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix B. (search)
. He has also forces, according to the report of General Bragg, landing at Pittsburg, from 25,000 to 50,000, and moving in the direction of Purdy. This army corps moving to join Bragg is about 20,000 strong. Two brigades, Hindman's and Wood's, are, I suppose, at Corinth. One regiment of Hardee's division, Lieutenant-Colonel Patton commanding, is moving by cars today (20th March), and Statham's brigade, Crittenden's division. The brigade will halt at Iuka, the regiment at Burnsville. Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment at Burnsville, and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, and Helm's cavalry at Tuscumbia; Bowen's brigade at Courtland; Breckinridge's brigade here; the regiments of cavalry of Adams and Wharton on the opposite bank of the river; Scott's Louisiana cavalry at Pulaski, sending forward supplies; Morgan's cavalry at Shelbyville, ordered on. Tomorrow Breckinridge's brigade will go to Corinth; then Bowen's. When these pass Tuscumbia and Iuka, tra
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
command. Again was Colonel Lewis mentioned in the most flattering terms by Breckinridge, commander of the division, and D. H. Hill, corps commander. On the 30th of September, 1863, he was promoted to brigadier-general and continued in command of the Kentucky brigade, then including the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Ninth regiments and the Forty-first Alabama. He led the brigade in the unfortunate battle of Missionary Ridge and on the retreat to Dalton. His command formed a reserve to support Cleburne at the battle of Ringgold Gap. On the Dalton-Atlanta campaign Lewis' brigade was actively engaged at Mill Creek Gap, Resaca, New Hope Church, Dallas, Pine Mountain and Kenesaw Mountain. It participated also in the battle of Peachtree Creek July 20th, and in that of Atlanta, July 22d. On the 6th of August at Utoy creek, Lewis' brigade participated in the fight of Bate's division against Schofield. This affair resulted in the great discomfiture of the enemy, the capture of several stand o