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The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations 10 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches. You can also browse the collection for Cleopatra or search for Cleopatra in all documents.

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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Centennial Contributions (search)
uction. Hawthorne evidently fell into Story's hands. He speaks slightingly of Crawford, and praises Story's statue of Cleopatra in unqualified terms; and yet there seems to have been an undercurrent of suspicion in his mind, for he says more than t unique figures among the world's geniuses. action and royal abandon which greets us in Shakespeare's and Plutarch's Cleopatra. Story might have taken a lesson from Titian's matchless Cleopatra in the Cassel Gallery, or from Marc Antonio's smallCleopatra in the Cassel Gallery, or from Marc Antonio's small woodcut of Raphael's Cleopatra. Hawthorne was an idealist, and he idealized the materials in Story's studio, for literary purposes, just as Shakespeare idealized Henry V., who was not a magnanimous monarch at all, but a brutal, narrow-minded figCleopatra. Hawthorne was an idealist, and he idealized the materials in Story's studio, for literary purposes, just as Shakespeare idealized Henry V., who was not a magnanimous monarch at all, but a brutal, narrow-minded fighter. The discourse on art, which he develops in this manner, forms one of the most valuable chapters in the Marble Faun. It assists us in reading it to remember that Story was not the model for Hawthorne's Kenyon, but a very different character.