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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 213 57 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 189 23 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 53 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 9 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 15, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Henry Clinton or search for Henry Clinton in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
corps was between Jackson and Raymond, McClernand's in supporting distance. General Pemberton, with 17,000 men, was at Edwards depot and marching to give battle. General Johnston did not have exceeding 6,000 men in and about Jackson. The three corps of General Grant numbered about 45,000 effectives. It was easy to beat Johnston at Jackson before Pemberton could possibly come to his aid, as the latter had only reached Edwards on the 13th, and formed for defensive battle at that point. Clinton was 8 miles from Jackson, and Edwards was distant 25 miles, so that Grant was between Pemberton and Johnston, 25 miles from the former and 8 miles from the latter. This was the situation on the night of the 13th of May. McPherson advanced upon Jackson early on the 14th, on the Clinton road, and Sherman at the same time, on the Raymond and Mississippi Springs road, both corps converging on Jackson, while Pemberton was in line of battle at Edwards, and General Grant's cavalry was demonstra
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
the First artillery, and of Lieutenants Halsey and Raworth, Second artillery. These officers and Corporal Crawford were distinguished for gallantry. Five barges were captured. The 3d was opened with an artillery battle along the line, and the enemy's monitors and gunboats were seen ascending the Stono. Legareville and other points on John's island were occupied, and Taliaferro was led to believe that the enemy was engaged in a serious movement, on the same line as that adopted by Sir Henry Clinton in March, 1780, who occupied John's island, crossed the Stono at the site of Fort Pemberton, and after gaining possession of the Stono, moved from James' island to the mainland. Nevertheless the Confederate line put on a bold front and Colonel Harrison, with his Georgians, advanced and drove back the Federal pickets to their original line. For several days afterward artillery firing continued along the lines, and attacks upon Manigault's picket line. The Federal fleet opened a terr
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ed to the State legislature and served one term. Dr. Shands took an active part in the campaign of 1876, having a company of one hundred democratic negroes in the celebrated red shirt campaign. He is commander of Camp R. S. Owens, U. C. V., of Clinton, and a member of the board of visitors of the Thornwell orphanage of the same place. He has been twice married, his first wife being Miss Evie Pitts, who died in 1882. In 1883 he married Miss Rebecca Copeland, of Clinton, daughter of George P.Clinton, daughter of George P. Copeland, a prominent citizen of that place. Dr. Copeland has been mayor of Clinton for twelve of the fifteen years he has lived there, and is the present incumbent. Lieutenant Edward M. Shannon, a Confederate veteran who is now a farmer of Chester county, is a native of that county and was born in 1835. He is a son of Hiram and Margaret (McKeown) Shannon. His father was a planter before him, and his grandfather Shannon was also a native of Chester county. The next remote ancestor was a