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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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many disadvantages; but our loss--one hundred and fifty killed and wounded, out of an effective force of four hundred and eighty, including the ambulance corps, about one third--will show how nobly the Twenty-eighth behaved in this great struggle for independence. I would respectfully call to your attention Captain T. James Linebarger, of company C, and Captain 1). A. Parker, of company 1); First Lieutenant N. Clark, of company E; First Lieutenant E. G. Morrow, of company G; First Lieutenant W. W. Cloninger, of company B; Second Lieutenant Robert D. Rhyne, of company B. All of these officers behaved with great gallantry and bravery. Sergeant-Major Milton A. Lowe, on the battle-field of the twenty-seventh and thirtieth, more than once proved himself a brave and fearless young defender of Southern rights, and has won the admiration of all who saw him. Color-bearer J. P. Little, of company C, was wounded on the twenty-seventh, but was at his post again in a short time. Respect
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
ond under many disadvantages; but our loss--one hundred and fifty killed and wounded out of an effective force of four hundred eighty, including the ambulance corps, about one-third--will show how nobly the Twenty-eighth behaved in this great struggle for independence. I would respecfully call your attention to Captain T. James Linebarger, of Company C, and Captain D. A. Parker, of Company D; First Lieutenant N. Clark, of Company E; First Lieutnant E. G. Morrow, of Company G; First Lieutenant W. W. Cloninger, of Company B, and Second Lieutenant Robert D. Rhyne, of Company B. All of these officers behaved with great gallantry and bravery. Sergeant-Major Milton A. Lowe, on the battlefields of the 27th and 30th, more than once proved himself a brave and fearless young defender of Southern rights, and has won the admiration of all who saw him. Color-Bearer J. P. Little, of Company C, was wounded on the 27th, but was at his post again in a short time. Respectfully, James H. Lan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
f prisoners. Our loss was three killed and seventy-one wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Purdie, who bravely commanded the Eighteenth in most of these engagements, desires that special mention should be made of Captain John D. Barry, of Company I, for his coolness and gallantry and devotion to duty. Captains Turner and Knox, of the Seventh, have, on all occasions, but especially as commanders of skirmishers, won the admiration of the entire brigade by their daring and efficiency. Lieutenants Cloninger and McCauley, of the Twenty-eighth, are also deserving special notice for their great bravery and faithfulness in the discharge of their duties. Very respectfully, James, H. Lane, Brigadier-General. Extract from Brigadier-General Archer's report. Sharpsburg, 17th September--General Branch's brigade came down about thirty minutes after I reached the wall and formed some thirty paces to my rear, where General Branch was killed, and Colonel Lane, assuming command of his br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
s struck. After the battle, when Captain Holland, of Company H, congratulated General Lane on his escape, he added: And I am indebted to a biscuit for my own life. Running his hand into his haversack, he drew forth a camp buscuit about the size of a saucer, cooked without salt or shortening of any kind, and looking like horn when sliced—something that an ostritch could not digest-and there was a Yankee bullet only half imbedded in that wonderful biscuit. It was here that First Lieutenant W. W. Cloninger, of Company B, as he lay at the field hopital, called Abernathy to him and asked why he had been neglected so long. When told that he was mortally wounded, and the surgeons considered it their first duty to attend to those whose lives might be saved, he replied: If I must die, I will let you all see that I can die like a man. Folding his arms across his breast, that hero, far away from his loved ones, lay under that tree in Yerby's yard, and without a murmur quietly awaited de
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The laying of the corner-stone of the monument to President Jefferson Davis, (search)
llion, The, 2. Catlett's Station, Action at, 99. Cedar Mountain, Casualties in Battle of, 143, 262. Cedar Run, Battle of, 331. Chalmers, General J. R , 122. Chancellorsville, Battle of, 100-205, 264; burnt field of, 333. Chattanooga, 92. Chickamauga, Battle of, 92. Clarke Cavalry (Co. D), 1st Virginia Cavalry; history and roster of, 145. Clingman, General T. L., The career of, 303; duel with W. L. Yancey, 304; as a Senator, 306; his tobacco cure, 307. Cloninger, Lieutenant W. W., killed, 333. Cohoon's Battalion disbanded, 99. Cold Harbor, Battle of, 107; casualties in, 139, 266. Collins, Charles N., 102. Compromise measures in Mississippi, Missouri, 60. Compton, Sergeant W. A., 82. Confederate Flag, 117; army commands from the several States, 200; an incident in the financial history 230; restricted resources, 375. Conyer, Luther, 315. Corcoran, W. W., 307. Crater, Battle of, 193. Cunningham, S. A., 189. Currency in 1853, U. S., 62.