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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 154 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 137 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 105 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
s, and J. Patton Anderson; Mississippi, Wiley P. Harris, W. S. Wilson, Walker Brooke, Alexander M. Clayton, James T. Harrison, William S. Barry, and J. A. P. Campbell; Alabama, Richard W. Walker, Colin J. McRae, William P. Chilton, David P. Lewis, Robert H. Smith, John Gill Shorter, Stephen F. Hale, Thomas Fearn, and Jabez L. M. Curry; Georgia, Robert Toombs, Martin J. Crawford, Benjamin H. Hill, Augustus R. Wright, Augustus H. Kenan, Francis S. Bartow, Eugenius A. Nisbet, Howell Cobb, Thomas R. R. Cobb, and Alexander H. Stephens; Louisiana, John Perkins, Jr., Charles M. Conrad, Edward Sparrow, Alexander De Clouet, Duncan F. Kenner, and Henry Marshall. The Texas delegates were not appointed until February 14th. These delegates had been appointed by the conventions of their respective States on the ground that the people had intrusted the State conventions with unlimited powers. They constituted both the convention that organized the Confederacy and its Provisional Congress. On
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 16: (search)
sation in the hostile army, everybody regarding the work as but half done, and expecting a renewal of the attack the following morning. Of our own army only one-third had been engaged, and our loss did not exceed 1800 in killed and wounded. Most of these belonged to A. P. Hill's division, and had fallen during the first attack in the morning on the spot where our lines had for some time been broken. We had to mourn the loss of two general officers, Maxey Gregg of South Carolina, and Thomas R. R. Cobb of Georgia, who fell on Marye's Heights. At his side General Cooke, a brother of Mrs Stuart, was dangerously wounded in the forehead. The Federal loss was not less than 14,000 in killed and wounded (we took only 800 prisoners), and in this frightful aggregate of casualties was to be reckoned the loss of many officers of rank. Among these there was the much-lamented General Bayard, a cavalry officer of great promise, who, far in the rear of his lines, was torn to pieces by one of ou
, under the command of Colonel Neal Dow, left Camp Beaufort, Augusta, for the seat of war. Flag.-officer Goldsborough and Brig.-Gen. Burnside issued a proclamation at Roanoke Island, explaining the object of their mission, declaring the course they intend to pursue, and inviting the inhabitants of North-Carolina to separate themselves from the malign influence of the bad men in their midst, and to return to their allegiance.--(Doc. 49.) Howell Cobb, R. Toombs, M. J. Crawford, Thomas R. R. Cobb, members from Georgia, have issued an address to the people of that State, on relinquishing their seats in the provisional Congress of the Confederate States. They call upon the people of Georgia to exert every nerve, and strain every muscle, to repress the invaders. Though acknowledging the Southern inability to cope with the resources, numbers, equipments and munitions of war of the North, they urge the confederates to provide against these odds by desperate courage, unflinching da
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
. Battery (Fluvanna Arty.), Capt. Charles T. Huckstep; Va. Battery (Amherst Arty.), Capt. Thomas J. Kirkpatrick; Va. Battery (Morris Arty.), Capt. R. C. M. Page. Loss: k, 1; w, 1 ==2. cavalry, Brig.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart: 1st N. C., Lieut.-Col. James B. Gordon, Col. Lawrence S. Baker; 1st Va., Col. Fitzhugh Lee; 3d Va., Col. Thomas F. Goode; 4th Va., Capt. F. W. Chamberlayne; 5th Va., Col. Thomas L. Rosser; 9th Va., Col. W. H. F. Lee, 10th Va., Col. J. Lucius Davis; Ga. Legion, Col. Thomas R. R. Cobb; 15th Va. Battalion, Maj. J. Critcher; Hampton (S. C.) Legion (squadron), Capt. Thomas E. Screven; Jeff Davis (Miss.) Legion, Lieut.-Col. W. T. Martin; Stuart Horse Artillery, Capt. John Pelham. Cavalry loss (incomplete): k, 5; w, 26; m, 40==71. Total Confederate loss (approximate): 3286 killed, 15,909 wounded, and 940 captured or missing == 20,135. The strength of the Confederates is not officially stated, but it probably ranged from 80,000 to 90,000 effectives. From A ph
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
about twenty-five hundred men, being all of General T. R. R. Cobb's brigade, and a portion of the brigade of G, and give me plenty of ammunition, Brigadier-General Thomas R. R. Cobb. From a photograph. Before the war, General Cobb was a lawyer. He was born in Georgia in 1820. In 1851 he published a Digest of the Laws of Ged, a gallant fellow came within one hundred feet of Cobb's position before he fell. Close behind him came soas the only effort that looked like actual danger to Cobb, and after it was repulsed I felt no apprehension, aver, to carry ammunition than as a reinforcement for Cobb. Kershaw dashed down the declivity and arrived just in time to succeed Cobb, who, at this juncture, fell from a wound in the thigh and died in a few minutes fromies of their dead. Before the well-directed fire of Cobb's brigade, the Federals had fallen like the steady de line behind the stone fence. The position held by Cobb surpassed courage and resolution, and was occupied b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
k. Early on the night of the 11th General Thomas R. R. Cobb was directed to relieve the brigade on the crest of Marye's Hill over the heads of Cobb's men [see p. 97], and two brigades under Gener. This continued until about 1 P. M., when General Cobb reported to me that he was short of ammunit, and directed General Kershaw to reinforce General Cobb with two of his South Carolina regiments, arders had been given I received a note from General Cobb, informing me that General R. H. Anderson, sending two of his regiments to strengthen General Cobb's line Brigadier-General Robert Ransom, Ccheck, or aid in repelling, any force coming on Cobb's flank, until the force in the sunken road cound the 16th Georgia was doubled on the right of Cobb's brigade in the road. The 3d and 7th South Ca, was ignorant of Crumley's daring feat. General Cobb, who was wounded by a musket-ball in the caays he saw the wound, and I am assured that General Cobb received all possible attention, and that e[11 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Ransom's division at Fredericksburg. (search)
tteries on Marye's and Willis's hills, at the foot of which Cobb's brigade of McLaws's division and the 24th North Carolina his report continues, the brave and lamented Brigadier-General Thomas R. R. Cobb fell at the head of his gallant troops, and ke was borne from the field severely wounded. Fearing that Cobb's brigade might exhaust its ammunition, General Longstreet e two regiments to its support. Arriving after the fall of Cobb, he assumed command, his troops taking position on the cres three other regiments. General Kershaw took command of Cobb's brigade, which I had had supplied with ammunition from myolleys, and then it took position shoulder to shoulder with Cobb's and Cooke's men in the road. During this third attack General Cobb was mortally hit, and almost at the same instant, and within two paces of him, General Cooke was severely woundfine spirits and an abundance of ammunition. I had ordered Cobb's brigade supplied from my wagons. After this third atta
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Kershaw's brigade at Fredericksburg. (search)
s an error in relation to the operations of my brigade. In the morning of that day, my troops were stationed at the foot of Lee's Hill. After the assaults on General Cobb's position had commenced, I was directed to send two of my regiments to reenforce Cobb, and did so. Before they had reached him, tidings arrived of the fall ofCobb, and did so. Before they had reached him, tidings arrived of the fall of General Cobb, and I was immediately ordered to take the rest of my brigade to the position held by his forces, and assume command of the troops of McLaws's division there. I preceded my troops, and as soon as possible arrived at the Stevens House at the foot of Marye's Hill. As my brigade arrived they were placed--two regimentsGeneral Cobb, and I was immediately ordered to take the rest of my brigade to the position held by his forces, and assume command of the troops of McLaws's division there. I preceded my troops, and as soon as possible arrived at the Stevens House at the foot of Marye's Hill. As my brigade arrived they were placed--two regiments, the 3d and the 7th South Carolina, at Marye's House on the hill, and the rest of them in the sunken road, with the left resting about the Stevens House. The last regiment that arrived was the 15th South Carolina (Colonel De Saussure's). He sheltered his command behind the cemetery on the hill until his proper position was made
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A hot day on Marye's Heights. (search)
ipes, after a lunch of hard crackers, a courier came to Colonel Walton, bearing a dispatch from General Longstreet for General Cobb, but, for our information as well, to be read and then given to him. It was as follows: Should General Anderson, on yoo his movements. Descending the hill into the sunken road, I: made my way through the troops, to a little house where General Cobb had his headquarters, and handed him the dispatch. He read it carefully, and said, James A. Seddon, Secretary of Wd fallen facing the very muzzles of our guns. Cooke's brigade of Ransom's division was now placed in the sunken road with Cobb's men. At 2 P. M. other columns of the enemy left the crest and advanced to the attack; it appeared to us that there was n hill. It left dead men on Miller's redoubt, and he had to drag them away from the muzzles of his guns. At this time General Cobb fell mortally wounded, and General Cooke was borne from the field, also wounded. Among other missiles a 3-inch rifle-
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Notes of a Confederate staff-officer. (search)
Notes of a Confederate staff-officer. by W. Roy Mason, Major, C. S. A. Fredericksburg was the first great battle that I saw in its entire scope. Here the situation of the country — a champaign tract inclosed in hills — offered the opportunity of seeing the troops on both sides, and the movements down the entire lines. I witnessed the magnificent charges made on our left by Meagher's Irish Brigade, and was also a sorrowful witness of the death of our noble T. R. R. Cobb of Georgia, who fell mortally wounded at the foot of the stone-wall just at the door of Mrs. Martha Stevens. This woman, the Molly Pitcher of the war, attended the wounded and the dying fearless of consequences, and refused to leave her house, although, standing just between the advancing line of the enemy and the stone-wall, the position was one of danger. It is said that after using all the materials for bandages at her command, she tore from her person most of her garments, even on that bitter cold day, in h
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