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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 33 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, George 1739- (search)
governor of Newfoundland. In September, 1743, he was appointed governor of the colony of New York, and retained that office ten years. His administration was a tumultuous one, for his temperament and want of skill in the management of civil affairs unfitted him for the duties. He was unlettered; and being closely connected with the Dukes of Newcastle and Bedford, he was sent to New York to mend his fortune. In his controversies with the Assembly he was ably assisted by the pen of Dr. Cadwallader Colden, afterwards lieutenant-governor of the province. His chief opponent was Daniel Horsmanden, at one time chief-justice of the colony. After violent quarrels with all the political factions in New York, he abandoned the government in disgust, and returned home in 1753. He became governor of Greenwich Hospital — a sinecure. In 1745 he was vice-admiral of the red, and in 1757 admiral of the fleet. He died while governor of Newfoundland, July 10, 1761. Vice-President of the Unite
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colden, Cadwallader 1688- (search)
Colden, Cadwallader 1688- Physician; born in Dunse, Scotland, Feb. 17, 1688; graduated at the University of Edinburgh in 1705, and became a physician and Cadwallader Colden. mathematician. In 1708 he emigrated to Pennsylvania, and returned to his native country in 1712. He came again to America in 1716, and in 1718 made hiCadwallader Colden. mathematician. In 1708 he emigrated to Pennsylvania, and returned to his native country in 1712. He came again to America in 1716, and in 1718 made his abode in New York, where he was made first surveyor-general of the colony, became a master in chancery, and, in 1720, obtained a seat in Governor Burnet's council. He received a patent for lands in Orange county, N. Y., about 10 miles from Newburg, and there he went to reside in 1755. Becoming president of the council, he admf governors. During the Stamp Act excitement the populace burned his coach. After the return of Governor Tryon in 1775, he retired to his seat on Long Island. Dr. Colden wrote a History of the five Indian Nations of Canada in 1727. He was an ardent student of botany, and introduced the Linnaean system into America. He publishe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Green Mountain boys. (search)
e French and Indian War (q. v.), and the present State of Vermont was largely covered by Wentworth's grants. The authorities of New York now proceeded to assert their claims to this territory under the charter given to the Duke of York. Acting-Governor Colden issued a proclamation to that effect, Dec. 28, 1763, to which Wentworth replied by a counter-proclamation. Then the matter, on Colden's application, was laid before the King in council. A royal order was issued, March 13, 1764, which deColden's application, was laid before the King in council. A royal order was issued, March 13, 1764, which declared the Connecticut River to be the eastern boundary of New York. The settlers did not suppose this decision would affect the titles to their lands, and they had no care about political jurisdiction. Land speculators caused the New York authorities to assert further claims that were unjust and impolitic. On the decision of able legal authority, they asserted the right of property in the soil, and orders were issued for the survey and sale of farms on the Grants in the possession of actual
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York City (search)
to resign. Alarmed by the aspect of the public temper, he had placed the stamps he had received in the hands of acting Governor Colden, who resided within Fort George, protected by a strong garrison under General Gage. Colden had strengthened the Colden had strengthened the fort and replenished the magazine. The people construed this act as a menace, and were highly exasperated. Armed ships were in the harbor, and troops were prepared to enslave them. But the people did not hesitate to assemble in great numbers befoointed leader. A refusal was answered by defiant shouts, and the populace assumed the character of a mob. They hung Governor Colden in effigy in the Fields (see page 417), marched back to the fort, dragged his fine coach to the open space in front it was intended to distract and divide, and so to weaken, the colonies. It hinted at a corrupt coalition between acting Governor Colden and the powerful James De Lancey, and called upon the Assembly to repudiate the act concocted by this combination
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, colony of (search)
Assembly, convened in February. 1768, composed of less pliable New York Harbor in colonial days. materials, would not recede from its position of independence, though the province was made to feel the full weight of the royal displeasure. In May, 1769, the Assembly yielded, and made an appropriation for the support of the troops. In December the Assembly, under a pretext of enacting laws for the regulation of trade with the Indians, and with the concurrence of the lieutenant-governor (Colden), invited each province to elect representatives to a body which should exercise legislative power for them all. This was a long stride towards the American Union. Virginia chose representatives for the Congress, but the British ministry, who saw in the movement a prophecy of independence, defeated the scheme. On Jan. 26, 1775, Abraham Tenbroeck moved, in the New York Assembly, to take into consideration the proceedings of the first Continental Congress. He was ably seconded by Philip S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, State of (search)
3to 1753 Sir Sanvers OsborneOct. 10, 1753 James De LanceyOct. 12, 1853 to 1755 Sir Charles HardySept. 3, 1755to 1757 James De LanceyJune 3, 1757to 1760 Cadwallader ColdenAug. 4, 1760to 1761 Robert MoncktonOct. 26, 1761 Cadwallader ColdenNov. 18, 1761 to1765 Sir Henry MooreNov. 18, 1765 to 1769 Cadwallader ColdenSept. 12, Cadwallader ColdenNov. 18, 1761 to1765 Sir Henry MooreNov. 18, 1765 to 1769 Cadwallader ColdenSept. 12, 1769 to 1770 John Lord DunmoreOct. 19, 1770 to 1771 William TryonJuly 9, 1771 to 1777 State governors. Name.Party.When Elected.Opponents.Party. George Clinton 1777 1780 1783 1786 1789 Robert Yates. 1792 John Jay. John Jay 1795 Robert YatesDem.-Rep. 1798 Robert Livingston. George Clinton1801 Stephen Van RensselaerCadwallader ColdenSept. 12, 1769 to 1770 John Lord DunmoreOct. 19, 1770 to 1771 William TryonJuly 9, 1771 to 1777 State governors. Name.Party.When Elected.Opponents.Party. George Clinton 1777 1780 1783 1786 1789 Robert Yates. 1792 John Jay. John Jay 1795 Robert YatesDem.-Rep. 1798 Robert Livingston. George Clinton1801 Stephen Van Rensselaer. Morgan LewisDem.-Rep 1804 Aaton Burr. Daniel D. Tompkins 1807 Morgan Lewis. 1810 Jonas Platt. 1813 Stephen Van Rensselaer. 1816 Rufus King. John Taylor1817 De Witt Clinton 1817Peter B. Porter. 1820Daniel D. Tompkins. Joseph C. Yates1822Solomon Southwick. De Witt Clinton 1824Samuel Young. 1826William B. Rochester.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
59 Battle of Quebec; General Wolfe killed......Sept. 13, 1759 Surrender of Quebec......Sept. 18, 1759 Governor De Lancey dies......July 30, 1760 Cadwallader Colden, acting governor......July 30, 1760 Capitulation of M. de Vaudreuil at Montreal and the entire reduction of Canada......Sept. 8, 1760 Death of George II.; George III. succeeds......Oct. 25, 1760 Robert Monckton, governor......November, 1761 Leaves the government to Cadwallader Colden......1761 New York claims jurisdiction over the present State of Vermont......1762 Sir Henry Moore, governor, arrives. 1765 Sons of Liberty organized in New York......1765 Colonial amp Act......March 18, 1766 English treaty with the Iroquois, Delawares, Shawnees, and Mingoes at Fort Stanwix......Nov. 5, 1768 Sir Henry Moore dies; Cadwallader Colden again acting governor......Sept. 1, 1769 Boundary settled between New York and New Jersey......1769 Liberty-pole in New York City cut down by British
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vermont, (search)
rth, of New Hampshire, makes a grant of Bennington......1749 Bennington settled......1761 Proclamation by Lieutenant-Governor Colden, of New York, claiming the territory west of the Connecticut, now Vermont, under grants from Charles II. to thls to the King, who decides the Connecticut River to be the eastern boundary of New York......July 20, 1764 Lieutenant-Governor Colden proclaims Vermont annexed to New York......April 10, 1765 First New York patent for lands in Vermont, under Colden's proclamation, for 26,000 acres, called Princetown, in the valley of the Battenkill, between Arlington and Dorset......May 21, 1765 Samuel Robinson, appointed by 1,000 settlers under the New Hampshire grants to present their petition to th5, 1766 King George III. forbids New York, until authorized, to grant land in Vermont......July 24, 1767 Lieutenant-Governor Colden disregards the order, and between September, 1769, and October, 1770, grants 600,000 acres......1769-70 New-
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the historians, 1607-1783 (search)
er New England historians. narratives of the Indian wars. Captain John Mason. Rev. William Hubbard. Benjamin Church. Samuel Penhallow. Daniel Gookin. Cadwallader Colden. John Lawson. political histories. Robert Beverley. Rev. William Stith. William Smith. Samuel Smith. Rev. Thomas Prince. Thomas Hutchinson In thehis time. His history of New England, had it been published, must have given us an important view of the subject. Another historian of the Indians was Dr. Cadwallader Colden, a man of learning and high position in Philadelphia and New York. He settled in New York in 1710, where he enjoyed the confidence of the authorities andok was biased, although not intentionally so. From them we turn at the very close of the colonial period to a New England historian as free from this influence as Colden or William Smith. Thomas Hutchinson was descended from Mrs. Anne Hutchinson, who was exiled from Massachusetts in 1638 because she defied the Puritan hierarchy,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
189 Clark, Lewis Gaylord, 241 Clark, Captain, William, 203-205, 209, 210 Clark, Willis Gaylord, 241 Clarke, James Freeman, 333, 355 Clarke, Nathaniel, 154 Clarke, Samuel, 76 Clay, Henry, 300 Clemm, Mrs., 280 Cleveland, John, 153 Cliffton, William, 175, 178 Clifton, Josephine, 224 Climbing the natural Bridge, 312 Clinton, De Witt, 190 Clinton, General, George, 144 Clinton, Governor, George, 148, 149, 292 Cobbett, William, 210 Cockings, George, 217 Colden, Dr., Cadwallader, 26, 28 Coleridge, Hartley, 213 Coleridge, S. T., 181, 194, 212, 266, 272, 278, 281, 332, 332 n., 357 Collector, the, 244 Colleen Bawn, 231 Collegians, the, 230 Collins, Anthony, 93, 102 Collins, William, 176, 177, 178, 183 Collinson, Peter, 96, 97, 195 Colman, Dr., Benjamin, 158 Colman, George (the younger), 228 Columbia, 167, 212 Columbiad, the, 170-171 Columbian magazine, the, 288 Columbia's glory, or British pride Humbled, 168-169 Columbus, 181,
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