hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 56 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Coleridge or search for Coleridge in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

the approbation of his commanding officer more than compensated for his suffering. By the order of the General he was at once removed to a private house near at hand, and attended by a skilful surgeon. The appearance of the college hospital was not at all creditable to its rebel keepers. The floors, the stairs, the walls, and even the windows, were covered with filth, and we had only to open the pantries, or stroll in the yards, to detect as many distinct and well-defined stenches as Coleridge counted in the dirty streets of Cologne. Medical stores and implements, fragments of furniture and clothing, broken crockery, cooking utensils, and kindred rubbish, was strewn all over the building, while the grounds, heretofore so picturesque and well-protected, which for their historic associations, if for nothing more, should have been jealously guarded, were a complete waste. The fences prostrate, the stone gate-posts overturned, the sod and trees destroyed, and even the marble statu