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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaign against Steele in April, 1864. (search)
e thoroughly demoralized and completely routed the long and serried lines of the enemy's infantry, causing them great loss in killed, wounded and prisoners, while Collins's battery did most effective service, and almost exceeded its usual superlative excellence in the accuracy of the fire and the devoted bravery of the company. opened upon Shelby with fifteen pieces of artillery, and continued to advance, but the resistance was as dogged as their advance was overwhelming. The section of Collins's battery, under the immediate command of Captain Collins, with almost unexampled courage, held the column of the enemy at bay, while the brigade swept from flankCaptain Collins, with almost unexampled courage, held the column of the enemy at bay, while the brigade swept from flank to flank, by the fierce fire of artillery and small arms, budged not until the order for retiring came. At nightfall the enemy had advanced but half a mile south of his position in the morning. At midnight I withdrew Shelby. The enemy had now reached the point where the roads from Washington, Camden and Louisville join, lookin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Orations at the unveiling of the statue of Stonewall Jackson, Richmond, Va., October 26th, 1875. (search)
the Commonwealth, the pomp was arrested until this humble comrade had also dropped his tear upon the face of his dead leader. Your Excellency did well to make the path broad which leads through these Capitol grounds to this statue, for it will be trodden by the feet of all who visit this city, whether they come from the banks of the Hudson, the Mississippi, or the Sacramento; whether from the Tiber, the Rhine, or the Danube. Tender though they be, cold and sad are the closing lines of Collins in his ode to the memory of the brave whose rest is hallowed by their country's benedictions, depicting as they do, Honor coming as a pilgrim gray, and Freedom as a weeping hermit repairing to the graves of departed heroes. Not so will Honor come to this shrine; not as a worn and weary pilgrim, but as a generous youth with burnished shield and stainless sword, and heart beating high in sympathy for the right and true, to lay his mail-clad hand on this altar and swear eternal fealty to du
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
en the oath of allegiance to U. S. Government. Clements, J. P., Assistant Surgeon, Oct. 31. ‘63, 11th Georgia Regiment. Coffman, Samuel H., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank from June 27, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, on duty at Dalton, Ga., Aug. 24, ‘62, ordered to report to Surgeon S. H. Stout, Headquarters, A. T., July 22, ‘63. Relieved at Dalton and ordered to report to General Wheeler for duty in the 51st Alabama Cavalry, Headquarters A. T., Dalton, March 31, ‘64. Collins, John W., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War, Dec. 4, ‘62, to take rank from Aug. 27, ‘62. Sept. 2, ‘62, ordered to report to General Polk, Dec. 31, ‘62, 8th Tennessee, Jan. 3, ‘63, 1st Tennessee. Feb. 28, ‘63, Scott's Battallion. Transferred from 1st Tennessee, Feb. 24, ‘63, by General Cheatham. April 22, ‘63, transferred with Battery to Artillery Corps by order General Polk, and ordered to report to General Martin. June 30, ‘63, 3d Alabama Cavalry, Headquarters
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
/2 o'clock. Sorry, because the men are busy completing their log cabins. Dec. 26. Lieutenant Wright left for home, and carried my Sharp's rifle. At 9 o'clock Major Proskauer led the regiment towards Paine's Mills, where we were to relieve the 14th North Carolina on fatigue duty, sawing plank for the Orange road. We lost the way, and marched 20 miles to reach a mill only 12 miles distant from camp, arriving about dark. Companies F, B and G, moved three miles from nearest mill to Squire Collins'. Supped and breakfasted at the Squire's. The 14th North Carolina desired to stay, and our regiment wished to return, so the engineer got an order from General Lee permanently detailing the 14th North Carolina for the work. Dec. 27. Marched very rapidly back to camp in a constant, driving rain, and arrived at one P. M. Dec. 28. Incessant rain for 24 hours. Lester obtained letter by flag of truce from John Attaway, now a prisoner at Point Lookout, and I wrote his mother at once, inc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
Ark., Rio Grande River, 1862. Cochran, J. L., Va., 1862. Cocke, P. St. Geo., Va., Brig. Gen., Va., 1861. Cocke, W. H., Asst. Surg. Va., Washington, D. C., 1865. Cocke, W. F., Va., Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Cohen, G., Ga., Bentonville, N. C., 1865. Coleman, L. M., Lt., Col., Prof. U, Va., Fredericksburg, Va., 1863. Coleman, T. G., Lt. Va., Manassas Va., 1862. Coleman, J. H., Maj. Ala., Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1861. Coleman, C. L., Capt., La., Spotsylvania, Va., 1864. Collins, W. G., Va., 186—. Cunrad, H. A., Va., Manassas, Va., 1862. Conrad, H. T., Va., Manassas, Va., 1863. Cooke, W. M, Va., 186—. Corbin, R., Va., Culpeper, Va., 1862. Cosnahan, J. B., Capt. S. C., Warren Co., N. C., 1863. Cossit, C. E., Capt. Tenn., Milton, Tenn., 1862. Cowan, C. S., Surg. Miss., 1862. Cowherd, C. S., Va., Orange Co., Va., 1863. Cowin, J. H., Ala., Chancellorsville, Va., 1861. Cox, J. E., Lt., Va., Chesterfield, Va., 1865. Cropp, J. T., Surg., V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
e a hearty dinner, minus the home turkey and cranberries and oysters and egg-nog and fruit cake, and then wrote to my mother and sisters. At 9 o'clock Dec. 26, Major Proskauer led the regiment towards Paine's Mills, where we were to relieve the 14th North Carolina, on fatigue duty, sawing plank for the Orange road, We lost the way, and marched 20 miles to reach a mill only 12 miles distant from camp, arriving after dark. Companies F, B and C moved three miles from nearest mill to Squire Collins. Supped and breakfasted at the Squire's. The 14th North Carolina desired to stay, and our regiment wished to return, so the engineer got an order from Gen. Lee permanently detailing the 14th North Carolina for this work. General Lee issued an order directing that furloughs be furnished hereafter at the rate of four to the 100 men present for duty. I had a drawing in company F, and Wm. Minims drew the furlough and application was made for him. I addressed a letter of inquiry to Gen. R
k, Michael, McLean Asylum. Clark, Michael, laborer, rear Cambridgeport. Cleaves, Edwin, h. Church. Cole, Erastus E., bridge builder, h. Perkins. Coles, physician, h. Mount Vernon. Cook, Arnold, yeoman, h. Cook Lane. Converse, Christopher C., b. grain dealer, h. Broadway. Connoly, Owen, laborer, h. Medford. Cook, Mrs. Catharine, h. Cambridge. Cook, Samuel, b. accountant, h. Cambridge. Cobb, Bailey, h. Chestnut. Covell, Reuben, b. fish dealer, F. H. market. Collins, Thomas G., carpenter, h. near Beech. Conant, Leonard, b. F. H. market, h. near Central. Corrigen, Henry, gardener, h. Beech. Conant, George F., Spring hill. Crane, Luther, b. paper manufacturer, h. Perkins. Critchett, Thomas, b. inspector, h. Broadway. Crimmins, Thomas, laborer, h. Medford. Crombie, William C., b. pianoforte maker, h. Dane. Crosby, Josiah L., b. bonnets, h. Elm. Crowe, William B., carpenter, h. Joy. Cummings, Aaron, b. plane maker, h. Joy.
sharing with them the hardships of early emigrants. Gorton, in Hutchinson, i. 73. Her powerful mind still continued its ac- Chap. IX.} tivity; young men from the colonies became converts to her opinions; and she excited such admiration, that to the leaders in Massachusetts it gave cause of suspicion of witchcraft. Winthrop, II. 9. She was in a few years 1642. left a widow, but was blessed with affectionate children. A tinge of fanaticism pervaded her family. one of her sons, and Collins her son-in-law, had ventured to expostulate with the people of Boston on the 1641. wrongs of their mother. But would the Puritan magistrates of that day tolerate an attack on their government? Ibid. II. 39. Severe imprisonment for many months was the punishment inflicted on the young men for their boldness. Rhode Island itself seemed no longer a safe place of refuge; and the whole family removed beyond New Haven into the territory of the Dutch. The violent Kieft had provoked an insur
June, and found detachments from England already there; and on the ninth of July the entire armament was assembled. At that time, Newcastle was reading Loudoun's letters with great attention and satisfaction, and praising his great diligence and ability. My Lord, said he, mentions an act of parliament to be passed here; I don't well understand what he means by it. Prince George, not surmising defeat, was thoughtful for the orthodoxy of America. A class of bold inquirers, Shaftesbury, Collins, Toland, Bolingbroke, Hume, had attacked the scholastic philosophy and the dogmas of the Middle Ages, had insinuated a denial of the plenary inspiration of the Bible and of the credibility of miracles, and had applied the principle of skeptical analysis to supernatural religion, and the institutions and interests connected with the, Established Church. They were freethinkers, daring to question any thing; they were deists, accepting only the religion of nature and reason. In Europe, where
by but the name of Stone, one of his companions, which he gave to a branch above Nashville. Remarkable Occurrences in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith, by himself. Reprinted in 1849, at Abingdon, Va., in Mirror of Olden Time Border Life. This narrative is adopted by John Haywood in his Civil and Political History of the State of Tennessee, from its earliest Settlement up to the year 1796, 35, 36. Ramsay in his Annals of Tennessee, 69, adopts Smith's narrative from Haywood. Collins in the chronological table to his Historical Sketches of Kentucky, accepts it also. Most of the party proceeded to the country of the Illinois. In North Carolina, the people along the upland frontier, many of whom had sprung from Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, Compare Foote's Sketches of North Carolina, chap. XI. suffered from the illegal exactions of Chap. XXVII.} 1766. Oct. Sheriffs and officials, whose pillaging was supported by the whole force of Government. The Sons of Liberty,
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