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's division, commanded by General Rodes; the First and Third regiments were in Colston's division. Hooker's plan was to uncover Banks' ford so as to get in easy c, Fourteenth and Thirtieth North Carolina regiments. Trimble's division under Colston composed the second line; in this were the First and Third North Carolina regi named from the left. Lane's left was on the road. Trimble's division, under Colston, composed the second line, and Rodes the third. To aid the infantry attacks, truck the Confederate left. Iverson and Thomas hurried some troops there, and Colston and Colquitt soon stopped the movement, and the general Confederate advance foed or severely cut up. The First and Third North Carolina regiments were in Colston's brigade and division. Colonel Warren was in command of Colston's brigade. Colston's brigade. This brigade was, however, under its fifth commander when Sunday's battle ended. Colonel Warren fell severely wounded, as did in turn his successors, Col. T. V. Wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
ute much of the improvement in our ammunition to this happy selection. A more earnest and capable officer I cannot imagine. What a set of men we would have had after the war out of which to form an Ordnance Department, had we been successful! Rains, St. John, Mallet, Burton, Wright, White, Baldwin, Rhett, Ellicott, Andrews, Childs, DeLagnel, Hutter, and others, who would have remained in the service. Then there were some no less admirable, like LeRoy Broun, Allan, Wiley Browne, Morton, Colston, Bayne, Cuyler, E. B. Smith, &c., who would doubtless have returned to their civil avocations. Among the obvious necessities of a well-regulated service, was one large, central laboratory, where all ammunition should be made—thus securing absolute uniformity where uniformity was vital. The policy of dissemination so necessary to husband our transportation, and to utilize the labor of non-combatants, must here yield to the greater necessity of obtaining our ammunition uniform in quality
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Central laboratory. (search)
ute much of the improvement in our ammunition to this happy selection. A more earnest and capable officer I cannot imagine. What a set of men we would have had after the war out of which to form an Ordnance Department, had we been successful! Rains, St. John, Mallet, Burton, Wright, White, Baldwin, Rhett, Ellicott, Andrews, Childs, DeLagnel, Hutter, and others, who would have remained in the service. Then there were some no less admirable, like LeRoy Broun, Allan, Wiley Browne, Morton, Colston, Bayne, Cuyler, E. B. Smith, &c., who would doubtless have returned to their civil avocations. Among the obvious necessities of a well-regulated service, was one large, central laboratory, where all ammunition should be made—thus securing absolute uniformity where uniformity was vital. The policy of dissemination so necessary to husband our transportation, and to utilize the labor of non-combatants, must here yield to the greater necessity of obtaining our ammunition uniform in quality
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A sketch of the life of General Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance of the Confederate States. (search)
ling—the very best proof of his fitness for his place and of a financial ability which supplemented the narrowness of Mr. Memminger's purse. General Gorgas had an admirable Staff of Officers, among them such men as. Major Smith Stansbury, Colonel G. W. Rains, Colonel LeRoy Broun, Colonel J. W. Mallett, T. A. Rhett, Snowden Andrews, Wright, White, Burton, De Lagnel, General St. John, Colonels Morton and Ellicott, Colonels B. G. Baldwin, William Alan, J. Wilcox Browne, E. B. Smith, Cuyler, Colston and others no less distinguished during the war than they have been in after life. These officers were in constant personal contact with their Chief, and all of them give testimony as to his great ability as an officer—his devotion to duty and his tact and kind consideration for them, and all of his subordinates. It was wonderful to witness the admiration and esteem which the workmen in the shops exhibited for him. Perfectly gentle and quiet in his manners, and without an effort, he exe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reinforcements wanted. (search)
serves, on his way for reinforcements. As he passed he shouted that they already had had a brush with the enemy, and the horse he was leading was one which had been captured from them. This was the last I saw of him. After fulfilling his mission, and no doubt returning to participate in the affray, he fell in with the advancing enemy and was slain, his body being found afterwards in the road, where they had ridden over him. Colonel Archer states in his paper that the mare belonged to General Colston, who afterwards recovered it. It has been stated to me that the Federal trooper who killed Wales Hurt, possessed himself of the mare, and was himself afterwards killed, and the horse subsequently restored to its lawful owner. The news considerably excited me, and I pushed on. It was now very near the middle of the day. On turning into the main road and nearing our camp, which was immediately on the Plank Road, and a short distance in the rear of the breastworks, I saw our attenuated
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
wing outline. On the 4th of May the army under Johnston at Yorktown, numbering about 55,000 men, was divided into four divisions: 1st, Magruder; 4 brigades, under D. R. Jones. 2d, G. Smith; 8 brigades, under Wilcox, A. P. Hill, Pickett, Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 or 5 brigades, under McLaws, Kershaw, Semmes and R. H. Anderson. On the 30th of May the army under Johnston at Richmond, about 70,000 strong, was divided into six divisions: 1st, Magruder; 6 brigades. 2d, Smith; 7 brigades, under Wilcox and Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under Early, Rhodes, Garland and Rains. 4th, Longstreet; 4 brigades, under McLaws, Kershaw, Semmes and R. H. Anderson. 5th, A. P. Hill; 2 or 3 brigades, under G. B. Anderson and Branch. 6th, Huger; 3 brigades, under Pryor, Mahone and Pickett. Holmes' division, comprising the th
The Daily Dispatch: February 22, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Southern Confederacy--an Answer to the Charleston Mercury. (search)
ia model musket. --The Commissioners appointed for arming the State found it necessary, before ordering the machinery for the armory, to prepare a model of the arm to be manufactured at the Virginia works.--After consulting the principal ordnance officers of the army, and learning from the War Department, through the Hon. James M. Mason, the usage of European armies, and after a course of experiments with muzzle and breech-loading arms at the Virginia Military Institute, conducted by Major Colston, the Commissioners determined to adhere to the muzzle- loading rifled musket for infantry of the line. In this conclusion, they follow the example of the American and European armies, and the advice of all the military men whom they consulted. Having determined the character of the arm, and its general conformity to the British and American regulation muskets, it became necessary to settle its details. In doing this, the Commissioners consulted the Master Armorer, Mr. Salmon Adams
Review of the Cadets. --Maj. Colston, with 163 of the Lexington Cadets, appeared on parade on the Square yesterday evening, creating the most unbounded enthusiasm among the spectators. Fifty of the Cadets were left at Lexington, and 185 started for this city.--Those not no parade were on duty at the Fair Grounds. The Cadets came prepared for war, are fully armed and equipped. They brought a battery of nine field-places--one of the pieces, a rifled cannon, is said to be the best place of ordnance in the State. These young men do not flinch from any duty, and herein they set a noble example--one worthy of all emulation. They were reviewed on the Square by the Governor.
ing years, and a most effective laborer in the harvest field of human souls. A presentation will take place to-day on Academy Square. A beautiful "flag of the South" will be presented to the 16th Regiment Virginia volunteers, commanded by Col. Colston. Major-General Huger will participate in the ceremonies. The regiment is expected in town at half past 11 o'clock. Among the many misrepresentations made by those enemies of the South who have been allowed to go to the North from this ci man thus liberated, after long confinement and terrible suspense, was overjoyed at the verdict, and, with a sister on either side of him, left the hall of justice, to go forth free again amid the dangers and temptations of social life. Colonel Colston's splendid regiment has just marched by towards Academy Square, to receive the flag to which I have alluded. The marching was admirable, and the regiment is manifestly one of the best in the State, which may well be proud of so noble a band
els are lying off Old Point. The flag presentation yesterday, at the Square of the Military Academy, attracted a large number of persons, and the military display was fine. The 14th Virginia regiment was out in full force, under command of Colston. After a brief but appropriate address by Maj. Gen. Huger, the beautiful flag was handed to Col. Colston, who responded in an old quent and spirited manner. I regret to state that the symptoms in the case of Rev, Dr. Lee are far more unfavy Academy, attracted a large number of persons, and the military display was fine. The 14th Virginia regiment was out in full force, under command of Colston. After a brief but appropriate address by Maj. Gen. Huger, the beautiful flag was handed to Col. Colston, who responded in an old quent and spirited manner. I regret to state that the symptoms in the case of Rev, Dr. Lee are far more unfavorable to-day He is again unconscious, and there are only very slight hopes of his receivers.
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