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f the officers generally; and while it would afford me great pleasure to mention the names of many whose conduct fell under my personal observation, I must refrain from doing so, lest by omitting others I should do injustice to many equally as meritorious. Annexed is a list of the casualties in my regiment. Many of those reported missing, I have learned, have either been killed or wounded, but as yet I have not ascertained their names. Respectfully submitted, Addison Farnsworth, Lieut.-Col. Comm'g Thirty-eighth Reg't, N. Y. V., (Second Scott Life Guard.) List of killed, wounded, and missing, Thirty-Eighth regiment, N. Y. S. V. field and staff.--Wounded--Major James D. Potter, slightly, and afterwards taken prisoner by the enemy. Missing--Assistant-Surgeon Stephen Griswold and Quartermaster Charles J. Murphy, both taken prisoners. Company A.--Wounded--Charles H. L. Roediger, slightly in the hand. Missing--Jacob Schindler and John McNamara. Company B.--Killed--
hem in double-irons. On boarding her, the crew were found in a drunken state, committing all the destruction they could — throwing overboard the arms and ammunition, spiking the gun, and cutting the sails and rigging to pieces. She was otherwise in bad order and poorly found, and having but a short supply of water, of which we had none to spare, was in no condition to send to Boston. Having twenty-seven prisoners, and no room for them on board the W. G. Anderson, I decided, as we were within three days sail of Key West, to take them and the vessel into that port and deliver them to the proper authorities, and thence return to my cruising-ground. I also am desirous of procuring, if possible, some ballast, of which the bark is very much in need. Trusting that my proceedings will meet with your approbation, I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant, William C. Rogers, A. V. Lieut. Comm'g U. S. Bark W. G. Anderson. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
lfth Corps at Littlestown. The cavalry was on both flanks of the army. Buford's division was at Frederick City, on its way to Boonsboro Pass. Kilpatrick's division and one brigade of Gregg's division was at Boonsboro. Two brigades of Gregg's division were just north of Cashtown and Fayetteville. The rear of the Confederate army occupied the Cashtown and Fairfield Passes. At 2 A. M., on the morning of July 6, General Meade sent the following to General Sedgwick: July 6, 1863, 2 A. M. Comm. Off. 6TH Corps. After conversation with General Warren, General Warren had just returned from the front. I think under existing circumstances you had better push your reconnoissance so as to ascertain, if practicable, how far the enemy has retreated, and also the character of the Gap, and practicability of carrying the same. In case I should determine to advance on that line, you must be careful and watch your right and rear, as roads from Cashtown all open to the enemy to advance ag
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 20 (search)
the conclusion he is either indirectly or directly the author. As the communication contains so many statements prejudicial to my reputation, I feel called upon to ask the interposition of the Department, as I desire to consider the questions raised purely official. I therefore have to ask, that the Department will take steps to ascertain whether Major General Sickles has authorized or endorses this communication, and in the event of his replying in the affirmative I have to request of the President of the U. S. a court of inquiry that the whole subject may be thoroughly investigated and the truth made known. Should this court not be deemed advisable, any other action the Department may deem proper I desire should be taken, and should the Department decline any action, then I desire authority to make use of and publish such official documents, as, in my judgment, are necessary for my defense. I am, Very respectfully Your obt. servant Geo. G. Meade Major General Comm'dg.
use. The navy seems to have sustained itself. I forward herewith the report of injuries to the hull and rigging, as also Gunner's report of expenditure of ammunition. The reports of the commanding officers in this division will be forwarded as soon as received. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. W. Godon, Commodore, Commanding Susquehanna and Fourth Division North Atlantic Squadron. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Report of Comm. William Radford. United States steamer New Ironsides, Anchored at sea, Beaufort bearing N. N. W., Distant about five miles from Beaufort, December 31, 1864. sir — I have the honor to report that, in obedience to your orders, I took position under the guns of Fort Fisher, from thirteen to fifteen hundred yards distant, or as near as the depth of water would permit, the monitors Canonicus, Monadnock, and Mahopac following the new Ironsides in. As soon as I anchored I opened my starboa
d the other, and was made on iniquitous principles. Established as the law of the strongest, it could endure no longer than the superiority in force. It converted commerce, which should be the bond of peace, into a source of rankling hostility, and scattered the certain seeds of a civil war. The navigation act contained a pledge of the ultimate independence of America. To the colonists, the navigation act was, at the time, an unmitigated evil; for the prohibition 12 Car. Il c. XXXIV. Comm. Chalmers, 243. of planting tobacco in England and Ireland, was a useless Chap XI.} mockery. As a mode of taxing the colonies, the monopoly was a failure; the contribution was made to the pocket of the merchant, not to the treasury of the metropolis. The usual excuse for colonial restrictions is founded on the principle that colonies were established at the cost of the mother country for that very purpose. Montesquieu, l. XXI. c. XXI. In the case of the American colonies, the apol
Roster of field, Staff and officers of the line. Col. Sherwin McRae, Commanding. Maj. J. J. Werth, 1st Major. Maj. Thos. G. Armstead, 2d Major. John F. Wren, Adjutant. Daniel E. Gardner, Quartermaster. F. W. Hancock, Assistant Surgeon. Edmund Fontaine, Sergeant Major. Walter K. Martin, Paymaster. Miles C. Selden, Assistant Commissary. Companies. Hanover Troop--Capt. Wms. C. Wickham, Lieut. Wm. B. Newton, Lieut. B. H. Bowles. Henrico Troop--Col. J. L Davis, Lieut. Comm'g B. W. Green, Jr., Lieut. John E. Friend. Governor's Guard, Richmond City--Capt. J. G. Cabell, Lieut. O. A. Crenshaw, Lieut. R. B. Kennon. Chesterfield Troop A--Capt. Henry W. Cox, Lieut. Jos. T. Mason, Lieut. Geo. C. Gregory. Chesterfield Troop B--Capt. Wm. B. Ball, Lieut. Wm. B. Wooldridge, Lieut. Charles B. Rhodes. Charles City Troop--Capt. Robert Douthat, Lieut. Thos. W. Willcox, Lieut. Archibald Taylor, Lieut. Benj. H. Harrison. Caroline Troop--Capt. George. Amelia Troop
a bloody issue questions which ought to be settled with temperance and judgment. We have the honor to be,Very respectfully, your ob't. serv'ts. R. W. Barnwell, Comm's. J. H. Adams, Comm's.Jas. L. Orr. Comm's. To the President of the United States. The President, in his reply, denies that any pledge was given Comm's.Jas. L. Orr. Comm's. To the President of the United States. The President, in his reply, denies that any pledge was given to South Carolina, and gives this version of the supposed arrangement: This being the condition of the parties, on Saturday, 8th December, four of the Representatives from South Carolina called on me, and requested an interview. We had an earnest conversation on the subject of these forts, and the best means of preventing a Comm's. To the President of the United States. The President, in his reply, denies that any pledge was given to South Carolina, and gives this version of the supposed arrangement: This being the condition of the parties, on Saturday, 8th December, four of the Representatives from South Carolina called on me, and requested an interview. We had an earnest conversation on the subject of these forts, and the best means of preventing a collision between the parties, for the purpose of sparing the effusion of blood. I suggested, for prudential reasons, it would be best to put in writing what they said to me verbally. They did so accordingly, and on Monday morning, the 10th instant, three of them presented to me a paper, signed by all the Representatives from So
Wanted.--supplies for the army. Applications will be received for furnishing supplies of Red Pepper, Potatoes, Peas Beans, and winter vegetables of all kinds, and Pickets for the use of the army, delivered at any point convenient to the troops, or in Richmond. a supply of Red Pepper is essentially necessary. --This article should be carefully preserved by all who which to minister to the comfort and health of our forces in the field, ground up and packed is bags, boxes or kegs. J. H. Claiborne. Major and Comm. Subsistence. Richmond Sept. 11th 1861. se 13--1m
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1862., [Electronic resource], The action at Forts Jackson and St. Philip. (search)
d mutiny, and that alone. Fort Macon was taken by land batteries. Let our men stand to their guns and fight them as the officers and men of our Navy did the other day at Drewry's Stuff, and there are few rivers in this country in which the Yankee gunboats will venture far — certainly not the James, the Cape Fear, or the Southern inlets below Charleston. I hope the above statement will cool some what the excitement produced by the name and approach of gunboats. As far as our side is concerned, there can be no doubt as to the accuracy of the above statements. What effect we may have produced on the enemy, there is no means of ascertaining. In time, however, from the false and contradictory statements they are compelled to make, the truth is gradually sifted. Thank God, our leaders are not obliged to lie, either to keep our courage up or to satisfy our Government or people. Very respectfully, W. H. C. Whiting, Brig. Gen. Comm'g 1st Div. Reserve, Army of the Potomac.
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