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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
mers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because he saw the deed. ... Mir. Brown's integrity was never doubted, and he was honorable in all his dealings, but peculiar in many of his notions, and adhering to them with great obstinacy. Mr. Brown was a quiet and peaceable citizen, and a religious man. Rev. Mr. Conklin, who was settled here in the North Congregational Church, and who separated himself in a great measure from other ministers because he thought them culpably indifferent to the sin of slavery, was intimate with Mr. Brown, and they sympathized in their anti-slavery ideas. Mr. Brown used to talk much on the subject, and had the reputation of being quite ulra. His bookkeeper tells me that he and his eldest son used to discuss slavery by the hour in his counting room, and that he used to
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Perkins and Brown, wool Factors. (search)
mers living in Western Pennsylvania. Mr. Brown left here in 1850 or 1851, and removed with his family to North Elba, Essex County, New York. This person says Gerritt Smith gave him a large tract of land there. He says he knows it because he saw the deed. ... Mir. Brown's integrity was never doubted, and he was honorable in all his dealings, but peculiar in many of his notions, and adhering to them with great obstinacy. Mr. Brown was a quiet and peaceable citizen, and a religious man. Rev. Mr. Conklin, who was settled here in the North Congregational Church, and who separated himself in a great measure from other ministers because he thought them culpably indifferent to the sin of slavery, was intimate with Mr. Brown, and they sympathized in their anti-slavery ideas. Mr. Brown used to talk much on the subject, and had the reputation of being quite ulra. His bookkeeper tells me that he and his eldest son used to discuss slavery by the hour in his counting room, and that he used to
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Pauline Cushman, the celebrated Union spy and scout of the Army of the Cumberland. (search)
til she had gained a full knowledge of the plan, and then secretly informed the United States authorities, by whom the poor soldiers were removed in time from the fate which awaited them, and the fiend-woman was treated to her deserved punishment. At another time, personating the somewhat notorious George N. Sanders, purporting to have just returned from Europe with highly important despatches, concorning the recognition of the Confederacy, etc., and also a certain Captain Denver, alias Conklin, Miss Cushman most successfully gammoned some of the leading secessionists of Louisville, especially a Mrs. Ford, and placed a very effectual embargo on a large amount of quinine, morphine, and other medicines, which were in transit to the rebel army. In course of time, Mr. J. R. Allen, of the new theatre of Nashville, Tenn., arrived at Louisville, engaged in looking up a good company of actors, and meeting with Mr. Wood of the Louisville theatre, was recommended to secure Miss Cushman.
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 9: under Grant in the Wilderness (search)
moments, I came to the edge of the woods and saw Goodman of our company leading Colonel Olcott's horse, and a Company G man told me that the colonel was shot in the head, and a prisoner. As I came out of the woods a little way, I saw a line of battle was formed and the men as they came up joined it. I loaded my gun which I had fired only once during the affair. The men I had seen as I came back must have been Rebs hurrying to their lines. In this affair Matteson, Proctor, Tieny, Young, Conklin and Beals were taken prisoners, and were sent to Andersonville. They were not exchanged for months and did not return to the regiment until after Lee's surrender. Shortly after we had formed in the field by the batteries, we were moved back into a line of entrenchments. About 10 o'clock the same night we marched back to the road, and following it some distance to the rear, moved off it again and went into line of battle near Wilderness Tavern, and threw up entrenchments. The same mornin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
ve dollars a barrel in Richmond and ten dollars in New York it will leave Richmond for the other city till the equilibrium is restored. The law of demand and supply rules the world. The undeveloped resources and wonderful advantages of the South are so vast that they may not be told and the world begins to know it. A great storm. Commodore Maury said that ninety miles from the Virginia coast is the point more free from storms than any other place in America. The storm that killed Conklin had its head centre in the great lakes, passed south behind the Appalachian hills, and struck the Atlantic below Charleston, then returned with the Gulf stream, struck the Jersey coast at Cape Henlopen. We hardly felt it here. What wonderful hidden stores of wealth are in your soil? At New river, near White Top mountain, Virginia, Washington got lead to kill the Indians. From these mines he had bullets made to shoot the British. The same mines furnished that material to fight the war o
ceived from the President, announcing the fact that he had signed the Kansas bill. Subsequently, Martin F. Conway, the member from that Territory, was sworn and took his seat. The report of the Committee of Thirty-Three was resumed. Mr. Conklin denounced the secessionists as apostates and rebels. He made a semi-abolition speech. He would, however, do something for the border States, but would not vote to re-establish the Missouri Compromise. Mr. Stevenson said if Mr. Conklin wMr. Conklin was a fair exponent of the Republican party, there was no chance for a compromise; but he still hoped border State Commissioners would be able to do something. Mr. Crittenden's proposition was offered as an equitable adjustment. Mr. Howard, of Ohio, made a conciliatory speech in favor of compromise. Mr. Morris, of Pa., wished to banish the agitating question of slavery from Congress.-- He favored the majority report of the Committee of Thirty-Three. If he could not get this, he w
advance of the division. Ha more time been taken the skirmishers could have discovered the ambuscade before the troops had entered the pass. As it was, the advance companies were almost directly under the rebels when they opened their fire. Orders were immediately given for us to ascend the hill, and by advancing around the ridge to get above and, if possible, in the rear. Before this could be done, however, the vigorous fire of our troops and some well directed shells thrown by Captain Conklin's battery had entirely dispersed them, with a loss of thirty-two killed and about the same number wounded. Our loss was four killed and twenty four wounded. Two of the latter have since died. Colonel Marshall's men suffered most severely. He himself had his horse shot under him, and a ball passed through his coat. The writer states that subsequently the Federal troops took possession of the town without serious opposition, and so ended the expedition again Preston. Release
ght aspect, may be producer of great good. Whilst he plainly tells the for the Union that he shall relax no efforts to compel obedience to the laws, he is willing to make one more attempt to settle matters on an admirable busts. Proceedings in the Yankee Congress. The Yankee Congress assembled at noon on Monday. A quorum was present in both Houses, not at once proceeded to business. Lincoln's message which we publish in another column, was reserved and read. In the House Mr. Conklin offered a resolution, which was adopted, directing the Committee on Naval Affairs to inquire and report as to the best made of placing vessels-of war on Lake Ontario, which the exigency shall arise and of establishing communication from other waters to the Lakes. A resolution submitted by Mr Vallandigham was adopted, directing an inquiry as to the alleged action of the Postmaster General in deciding what newspapers may, and what shall not, be transmitted through the mails Mr. Cox,