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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 1: San Carlos. (search)
rock and slope of sward; and here again, gardenlike copse and musical cascade; each nook commanding a view over cypress knoll, bright stream, green down, and blue illimitable sea. Nestling in a hollow at our feet, half hidden by the forest growths, yet with an out-look over ridge and ocean, lie the broken stones and falling rafters of San Carlos, a Franciscan church, built by Red men, natives of the country, acting under a company of Spanish friars. These friars, heralds of the first White Conquest of the Slope, brought into this corner of the earth the torch of Gospel light, hoping to convert and save some remnants of a savage and neglected tribe. Hitching our mustangs to a pine, and bidding our dogs keep watch, we vault the fence of sundried bricks, and feel our feet within the sacred courts; as sacred in this hour of ruin, as when cross and pyx were carried round these walls by holy men, and angelus and vesper swelled from the choir. The soil is black, the odour aromatic; f
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 29: fair women. (search)
he curse of God. Among the evils which impede White growth in America, that poverty in the female sex, which is caused by separate male adventure in the outset, is the first and worse. No riches in the soil, no beauty in the landscape, no salubrity in the climate, can make up to a colony for the paucity of women. Women are the other halves of men. The absence of White women at San Diego and San Carlos, was the chief, if not the only, reason for the waste and failure of the first White Conquest on the Slope. If Don Rivera had allowed each of his troopers to bring an Andalusian wife to Monterey, the first people in California would have been Spanish, Catholic and civilized, instead of being mongrel, pagan, and semi-savage. If the Yankee Boys and Sydney Ducks had brought American and English wives to San Francisco, there would have been less drinking, shooting, suicide, and divorce in that delightful city of the Golden Gate. If the trapper and the miner in the Rocky Mountains,
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 36: Outlook. (search)
e North Pole; and, some months hence, either President Grant or his successor at the White House, will annex the great provinces of Lower California, Sonora, and Chihuahua, with parts of Cinaloa, Cohahuila, and Nueva Leon, to the United States. The present boundaries of the Republic will be enlarged by land enough to form six or seven new States, each State as big as New York. The surface of the earth is passing into Anglo-Saxon hands. Yet, glorious and inspiring as this story of White Conquest is, the warning on the wall is brief and stern. The end is not yet come. The peril of the fight is not yet past, and the White successors of the Creeks and Cherokees are unhappily still wasting some of their best strength and noblest passion on internal feuds. Disaster in the past, menace in the future, warn us to stand by our common race; our blood, law, language, science. We are strong, but we are not immortal. A house divided against itself must fall. If we desire to see our f