Your search returned 112 results in 53 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 10: life at camp Shaw. (search)
where a few strokes of the pen will dispose of all this multiplicity of trappings as expended in action or lost in service. For one, the longer I remained in service, the better I appreciated the good sense of most of the regular army niceties. True, these things must all vanish when the time of action comes, but it is these things that have prepared you for action. Of course, if you dwell on them only, military life becomes millinery life alone. Kinglake says that the Russian Grand-Duke Constantine, contemplating his beautiful toy-regiments, said that he dreaded war, for he knew that it would spoil the troops. The simple fact is, that a soldier is like the weapon he carries; service implies soiling, but you must have it clean in advance, that when soiled it may be of some use. The men had that year a Christmas present which they enjoyed to the utmost,--furnishing the detail, every other day, for provost-guard duty in Beaufort. It was the only military service which they
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 14: (search)
an afternoon reception on a Saturday, soon after the inauguration, to which every one entitled to be received was invited. She had flowers and music and everything as elaborate as for an evening social function. Every one was charmed by the warmth of her greetings, which made them feel that she at least was destined to do her part toward making the new administration socially a success. Following this afternoon reception was a state dinner, given to the Russian Grand Dukes, Alexis and Constantine, to which were bidden diplomats, judges, senators, representatives, and many other distinguished persons, with their wives, including ourselves. The decorations of the house and table and everything connected with the magnificent entertainment were directed by Mrs. Hayes in person. Her triumph on this occasion convinced the critics that she was not a novice in social affairs of state. Mrs. Hayes was much criticised by a certain class for the stand she took in banishing wine from the
Another cross in the sky. A well-defined cross was seen in the sky a few nights since. A correspondent of the Wilmington (N. C.) Journal, writing from Kingston, N. C., gives the following description of the phenomena: The moon rose cloudless. At a little before seven o'clock, two bright spots, some twelve degrees, (quarter in extent?) were visible, one north and the other south, and immediately thereafter a cross was seen in the heavens, the moon joining the four arms of the cross. About half-past 8 o'clock the northern light went out, but the cross and the spot to the south remained until past ten, when I retired. Can any one tell when the cross has appeared before since the days of Constantine, when the letters of I. H. S. accompanied the sign? The Jackson (Miss) Crisis, Feb. 23.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
outhern cross, which the Great Creator has placed in the Southern heavens, by way of compensation for the glorious constellation at the north pole. The imagination of the young ladies was, no doubt, inspired by the genius of Dante and the scientific skill of Humboldt. But, Sir, I have no doubt that there was another idea associated with it in the minds of the young ladies — a religious one--and although we have not seen in the heavens the In hoc Signo vinces, written upon the Labarum of Constantine, yet the same sign has been manifested to us upon the tablets of the earth; for we all know that it has been by the aid of revealed religion we have achieved over fanaticism the victory which we this day witness; and it is becoming, on this occasion, that the debt of the South to the Cross should be thus recognized. I have also, Mr. President, another commission from a. gentleman of taste and skill in the city of Charleston, who offers another model, which embraces the same idea of a cro
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
the tributes (943). Scarcely a quarter of a century has passed, when Swatoslaus, favored by the disputes of Nicephorus with the king of the Bulgarians, embarks sixty thousand men (967), debouches into the Black Sea, ascends the Danube, and seizes Bulgaria. Recalled by the Patzinacites, who menaced Kiew, he allies himself with them, returns to Bulgaria, breaks his alliance with the Greeks, then, reinforced by Hungarians, crossed the Balkan and goes to attack Adrianople. The throne of Constantine was then occupied by Zimisces, who was worthy of it; instead of ransoming himself like his predecessors, he raises a hundred thousand men, arms a respectable fleet, repulses Swatoslans from Adrianople, obliges him to retire upon Silistria, and causes the capitol of the Bulgarians to be re-taken by assault. The Russian prince marches to meet the enemy, gives him battle not far from Silistria, but is forced to re-enter into the place, where he sustained one of the most memorable seiges of
hip is the price of liberty; the Federals, lashed into the field by the thong of golden bounties, and in the field lashed against the enemy by the invective and appeals of able spokesmen, so distrustful of their generals and each other, so pampered, and yet so dissatisfied. The aurora borealis, which overspread the heavens, and darted blood-red tongues of flame swiftly from the meridian down to the horizon, was accepted by the confederates as the cross outlined on the sky was accepted by Constantine — an earnest of assured victory. December 13, 1862. The morning of the thirteenth of December--a memorable day to the historian of the Decline and Fall of the American Republic — broke still and warm, while, as on the preceding day, a thick haze enveloped the town of Fredericksburgh and the circumjacent valley, and delayed the opening of fire by the antagonistic batteries until the sun had been up some three or four hours. It was strange to contrast Saturday, the thirteenth of Septemb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Patriotic letters of Confederate leaders. (search)
November 21st, 1861: A high courtesy from across the waters. We have the pleasure of publishing below a very interesting correspondence between the Grand Duke Constantine, Grand Admiral of Russia, and a distinguished citizen of our own State. It will be read with pleasure and pride. Pleasure, that so eminent a person in aance it has always been my desire to make, and whom Russia will be proud to welcome on her soil. Believe me, my dear Captain Maury, your sincere well wisher, Constantine, Grand Admiral of Russia. Richmond, Va., 29th October, 1861. Admiral — Your letter reached me only a few days ago. It fills me with emotions. In it I amnts that he has afforded me in the pursuits of science has inspired his obedient servant, M. F. Maury, Commander Confederate States Navy. To H. I. H. the Grand Duke Constantine, Grand Admiral of Russia, St. Petersburg. The following correspondence went the rounds of the press several months ago, but it should by all means be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen heroes: an address delivered by Hon. A. M. Keiley, of Richmond, on Memorial day, at Loudon park, near Baltimore, June 5, 1879. (search)
nly a moment of life remained to him, but he filled it with a sentence worthy of a Regulus or a Cato: Yesterday you learned how a Zulu can fight; learn now, how a Zulu can die. What, in its last analysis, was the subtle spirit that blazed forth in that barbarian's noble defiance? Let me ask further: What was it that nerved the immortal three hundred to bar with their living bodies the Persian's march on trembling Sparta? What was it that held aloft the heaven-given banner under which Constantine strove so gallantly to stay the flood of Rome's decline? What was it that bore along in wondrous triumph that square of crimson silk which floated beneath the imperial eagles from the Ganges to the Tweed? What was it that inspired the Dutch burghers in the seventeenth century to whelm their fields under the sea, and Russian princes to fire their palaces in the nineteenth? What made a Swiss peasant sow his living body with Austrian spears, and a French country girl exchange the safe com
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Standards, (search)
Standards, A flag or ensign round which men rally or unite for a common purpose; also an emblem of nationality. The practice of an army using standards dates from the earliest times. The emblem of the cross on standards and shields is due to the asserted miraculous appearance of a cross to Constantine, previous to his battle with Maxentius; Eusebius says that he received this statement from the Emperor himself, 312. The standard was named labarum. For the celebrated French standard, Auriflamme. The British imperial standard was first hoisted on the Tower of London, and on Bedford tower, Dublin, and displayed by the foot guards, on the union of the kingdoms, Jan. 1, 1801.
Southern cross, which the great Creator has placed in the Southern heavens, by way of compensation for the glorious constitution at the north pole. The inauguration of the young ladies was doubtless inspired by the genius of Dante, and the scientific skill of Humboldt. But sir, I have no doubt that there was another idea associated with it, in the minds of the young ladies — a religious one; and although we have not seen in the heavens the in hoc signo vinces written upon the labarum of Constantine, yet the same sign has been manifested to us upon the tablets of the earth; for we all know that it has been by the aid of revealed religion, that we have achieved over fanaticism the victory which we this day witness; and it is becoming on this occasion that the debt of the South to the cross, should be thus recognized. I have also, Mr. President, another commission from a gentleman of taste and skill, in the city of Charleston, who offers another model, which embraces the same idea o
1 2 3 4 5 6