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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
ing Military Division of the Mississippi. No. 2Organization of the Union forces. No. 3Lieut. Col. Edward D. Kittoe, U. S. Army, Medical Inspector. No. 4Brig. Gen. William F. Barry, U. S. Army, Chief of Artillery. No. 5Capt. Thomas G. Baylor, Ordnance Corps, U. S. Army, Chief of Ordnance. No. 6Capt. Orlando M. Poe, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, Chief Engineer, of operations July 1-October 31. No. 7Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, U. S. Army, commanding Army of the Cumberland. No. 8Surg. George E. Cooper, U. S. Army, Medical Director. No. 9Brig. Gen. John M. Brannan, U. S. Army, Chief of Artillery. No. 10Capt. John Rziha, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, Acting Engineer Officer, of operations September 1-2. No. 11Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations May 1-July 27. No. 12Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Army Corps, of operations July 27-September 8. No. 13Surg. J. Theodore Heard, U. S. Army, Medical Director. No.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 12 (search)
No. 8. reports of Surg. George E. Cooper, U. S. Army, medical Director. Med. Director's office, Dept. Of the Cumberland, Atlanta, Ga., October 11, 1864. Sir: The report of the campaign of the Army of the Cumberland, beginning in the first week of May, 1864, and ending with the capture and occupation of Atlanta, is made from personal knowledge beginning on the 10th day of June, 1864. All information previous to that time is derived from the records of this office, and-from oral information given me by medical officers connected with the army. I joined the headquarters in the field near Big Shanty, Ga., having been prevented by malarial fever from reaching the main army sooner. Shortly after the action at Resaca I went to that place, arriving the morning after the army had advanced, and observed the preparations which had been made for the reception of the wounded. By my direction the hospital train accompanied me, and all wounded able to be transferred in it were sent
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 17 (search)
fighting, the bad roads, and especially the inclemency of the season at the early part of the campaign, were obstacles which called into play all the energies of the medical officers of the corps, and of the officers of the ambulance corps. Too much praise cannot be given these officers for their untiring zeal and hearty co-operation. The ambulance corps was not organized until after the campaign had commenced, consequently many and serious obstacles had to be overcome; but notwithstanding the many unavoidable drawbacks this corps proved efficient, and at the present time promises still greater efficiency. Early in July forty-nine new ambulances were drawn, by order of the medical director of the department, which filled a deficiency which had existed from the commencement of the campaign. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. Theo. Heard, Surgeon, U. S. Volunteers, Medical Director. Surg. George E. Cooper, U. S. Army, Medical Director, Department of the Cumberland.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 2.-fight at Port Royal, S. C. January 1, 1862. (search)
gan, gunshot wound right thigh. John W. Rich, sergeant, Company I, Eighth Michigan, gunshot wound right thigh. John Weidenheimer, private, Company A, Fiftieth Pennsylvania, gunshot wound right foot. A. Herbert, ensign, Company A, Fiftieth Pennsylvania, wounded in leg by shell. The cases were merely flesh wounds, the balls easing through the limbs without injuring the bone. The patients are doing well. Water dressings used. George S. Kemble, Brigade-Surgeon, U. S. N. To Surgeon Geo. E. Cooper, Medical Director, E. C. Secession accounts. Charleston, S. C., Jan. 14. About ten o'clock New-Year's morning the enemy came up from Brook River toward Port Royal Ferry. Taking a position just opposite Page's Point, and west of the ferry, they opened a heavy fire of shot and shell against a small battery which had been constructed at Page's Point, but which had never received its complement of guns. Judging from the severity of the enemy's fire, it is supposed that he w
tion of the troops, defences, etc., in this portion of the Department of the South, which General Sherman has furnished. By command of Major-General D. Hunter. Charles G. Halpine, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Department of the South, Port Royal, S. C., April 3, 1862. General orders, No. 3. The following-named officers are hereby announced as additional members of the staff of the Major-General commanding Department of the South, and will report accordingly: Surgeon George E. Cooper, (Medical Department, United States Army,) Medical Director. Captain Louis H. Pelouze, (Fifteenth infantry, United States Army,) Acting Inspector-General. First Lieutenant Francis J. Shunk, (Ordnance Department, United States Army,) Chief of Ordnance. First Lieutenant James H. Wilson, (United States Topographical Engineers,) Chief Topographical Engineer. First Lieutenant E. J. Keenan, (Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers,) Chief Signal Officer. By command of Major-General D. Hunte
left behind at Atlanta, and did not have an opportunity to join me, after General Sherman determined on making his march through Georgia, before the communications were cut. I had with me Brigadier-General W. D. Whipple, my Chief of Staff; Surgeon G. E. Cooper, Medical Director; Captains Henry Stone, Henry M. Cist, and Robert H. Ramsay, Assistant Adjutants-General; Captain Henry Bernan, Acting Chief Commissary; Captains John P. Willard and S. C. Kellogg, Aids-de-Camp; and Lieutenant M. Kelly, Chand in killed, wounded, and missing. I have the honor to transmit herewith a consolidated return of casualties, the report of Colonel J. G. Parkhurst, Provost-Marshal General, and that of Captain A. Mordecai, Chief of Ordnance. That of Surgeon G. E. Cooper, Medical Director, will be forwarded as soon as he is enabled to complete it. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, George H. Thomas, Major-General U. S. A. Commanding. Colonel R. M. Sawyer, Assistant Adjutant-General, Military
in which he expected the co-operation of that order, and of rebels generally, and by which he hoped to obtain important military and political results. In pursuance of these plans, the lodges, with rebel recruiting officers and agents, sent into Missouri clandestinely or under cover of the amnesty oath for that purpose, began an insurrection in Platte county on the seventh of July last. From that time guerrilla warfare raged in the river counties, west from Calloway on the north, and from Cooper on the south side of the Missouri. This department having been depleted of troops, permission was obtained to raise volunteers to meet the exigencies of our situation, and under it about five complete, and as many incomplete regiments of twelve-months volunteer infantry had been organized previously to the raid. On the third of September General Washburn sounded the tocsin by information that the force under Shelby, at Batesville, Arkansas, was about to be joined by Price, for the inva
liam Wallace, who, with his fine company of marines, handled most effectively two extra nine-inch guns. Lieutenant Commander Blake, my Executive Officer, is all I can desire in battle-cool and collected, calm and intelligent. He is my right-hand man, I also beg to call special attention to Ensign Preble, the Master of this ship, who, whether under fire or any other circumstances, has proved himself without a superior in intelligence or ability on board the vessel. My aid, Master's Mate Cooper, was prompt in answering signals, and in his spare moments used the twelve-pounder howitzer on the hurricane-deck with effect. Thanks to the officers of the powder division, Acting Ensign Burnham, Gunner Waugh, and Sailmaker Holbrook, the ammunition was promptly supplied throughout the engagement. The engines, under the control of Chief-Engineer Johnson and his able assistants, were at all times ready for duty. Boatswain Z. Whitmarsh and Carpenter J. E. Miller, stationed in the m
uns and large quantities of small arms, stores, &c., were left in our hands and destroyed. General McCook assigned Colonel Cooper, Fourth Kentucky cavalry, to the command of the city, and immediately began the destruction of the public stores. Maorgia, recorded and reported for the information of the Medical Director, Army and Department of the Cumberland, Surgeon George E. Cooper, U. S. A. It had been intended to render this report more complete, and give the points of interest more in dgt. 4th Indiana Brig.-General J. T. Croxton,   Wentworth Commissary Sergeant 4th Indiana Brig.-General J. T. Croxton,   Cooper Colonel 4th Kentucky Colonel O. H. La Grange.   R. S. Hill Captain 2d Indiana Colonel O. H. La Grange. Wounded at West PMacon, Ga. April and May. Colonel Eggleston 10,000 Atlanta, Ga. May. An estimate; no report received up to date.Colonel Cooper 5,000 Albany, Ga. May. Major Williams 957 Milledgeville, Ga. May. Captain Walden 226 Forsyth, Ga. May. Captain Lam