hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

May 15. A fight took place in the vicinity of Camp Moore, La., between the expeditionary force under the command of Colonel Davis, and a body of rebel troops, resulting in a rout of the latter with great slaughter. After the fight, Colonel Davis advanced on Camp Moore, which he burned, together with the railroad depot and bridge, and a great quantity of property.--New Orleans Era. William Corbin and T. P. Graw, found guilty of enlisting for the rebel service within the National lines, were executed at Johnson's Island, near Sandusky, Ohio.--The rebel schooner Royal Yacht, was captured by the bark W. G. Anderson.--The rebels captured two small steamboats in the Dismal Swamp Canal, N. C.--The ship Crown Point, in latitude 7° south, longitude 34° west, was captured and burned by the rebel privateer Florida. Several desperate infantry fights took place to-day in the vicinity of Carrsville and Suffolk, Va., between the National forces under the command of General Peck, and
fterward recaptured, leaving eighty-five still in the hands of the enemy. The loss of the enemy was one captain and one lieutenant killed, and one lieutenant and three privates wounded. Mosby was himself wounded in two places, side and thigh. Colonel Lowell pursued the enemy from Centreville as far as Snicker's Gap, but they succeeded in making their escape by reason of having constant remounts of fresh horses.--Fitzhugh Lee, with a rebel cavalry force, crossed the Rappahannock River near Corbin's Neck, six miles below Fredericksburgh, but was soon driven back by the brigade of General Custer, with a loss in prisoners of three engineer officers, and a number of privates killed and wounded. The Union loss was slight.--the Richmond Whig of this day contained the following: A Southern paper, some weeks ago, threw out a suggestion that the Confederacy should arm some five or six hundred thousand negroes, and precipitate them upon the Yankees. The suggestion was doubtless to frighten t
s David Lyons and Jas. Hurst. Known to be Wounded and Prisoners-- First Sergt. Jesse Holton; privates William Gilmore, Warren R. King, David Kline, John Rowman, (Eighth Corporal,) Harvey J. Wolf, Paris Larimore, William Moore, Ozias Barker, Jonathan Shepard, Thomas Goudy, Henry Low. Prisoners on Parole--Captain William Kerr; First Sergt. Jos. Senior.; Fourth Sergeant Gilbert Holman; Fifth Sergt. Enoch Abrams; privates Adam Ralls, Moses Billingsly, John H. Clifton, John C. Corbin, William Corbin, (Second Corporal,) Harvey Zimmerman, (Third Corporal,) Julius C. Burgoyne, (Fifth Corporal,) Charles Lair, (Sixth Corporal,) Henry Conaway, (Seventh Corporal,) George W. Murphy, Joseph Hoever, Rolan Clark, William Light, William McCoy, Thomas Cully, Elmore Davis, William J. Miller, William Woodberry, William Boggs, John Vansickle, Joseph Servings, George W. Turner, Ira Hudson, Alonzo Allison, William Pettigrew, Alex. S. Kerr, Franklin Priest, Isaac Summers, Ben. F. Clifton, Calvin Rail,
s David Lyons and Jas. Hurst. Known to be Wounded and Prisoners-- First Sergt. Jesse Holton; privates William Gilmore, Warren R. King, David Kline, John Rowman, (Eighth Corporal,) Harvey J. Wolf, Paris Larimore, William Moore, Ozias Barker, Jonathan Shepard, Thomas Goudy, Henry Low. Prisoners on Parole--Captain William Kerr; First Sergt. Jos. Senior.; Fourth Sergeant Gilbert Holman; Fifth Sergt. Enoch Abrams; privates Adam Ralls, Moses Billingsly, John H. Clifton, John C. Corbin, William Corbin, (Second Corporal,) Harvey Zimmerman, (Third Corporal,) Julius C. Burgoyne, (Fifth Corporal,) Charles Lair, (Sixth Corporal,) Henry Conaway, (Seventh Corporal,) George W. Murphy, Joseph Hoever, Rolan Clark, William Light, William McCoy, Thomas Cully, Elmore Davis, William J. Miller, William Woodberry, William Boggs, John Vansickle, Joseph Servings, George W. Turner, Ira Hudson, Alonzo Allison, William Pettigrew, Alex. S. Kerr, Franklin Priest, Isaac Summers, Ben. F. Clifton, Calvin Rail,
Burnside's Military Executions. "They were both killed by the first fire, and died without a struggle. Their bodies were delivered to their friends from Kentucky by order of Gen. Burnside!" Thus read the telegram from Sandusky, Ohio, announcing the execution of T. P. McGraw and Wm. Corbin, who were sentenced to death, we believe, for endeavoring to enlist men in Kentucky for the Southern cause. They "died without a struggle," is the consoling announcement; and Gen. Burnside most graciously ordered their lifeless bodies to be"delivered to their friends! " That man, at the beginning of the war, put on the sir of the humane gentleman; but finding that not popular with the Yankees, he essays now a shorter road to favor and thrift in the Northern mind, by throwing off all hypocrisy and becoming the unrelieved and unmitigated brute. He sees how Butler has thriven in Yankee esteem — how he has firmly fixed himself on a granite base on the very rock of Plymouth, where he cannot be sha