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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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ap between his left and Newton, and Judah's and Cox's divisions of Schofield's corps came up in theke in the giving or reception of the order, General Cox's division failed to get up in time, and Juff officers in vain rode for hours in search of Cox's division through the thick underbrush in whicIn the meantime the gap in the line was filled, Cox took his position, and for an hour the incessan a slight skirmish fire. The division of General Cox, which finally turned up on Judah's left, fil they gained their first line of rifle-pits. Cox soon dislodged them and sent them back howling ir more formidable breastworks. At this moment Cox found that he was out of ammunition, and by somcorrespondent did the greatest injustice to General Cox's division, in the account he gave of the be any battery had come up. The artillery of General Cox's division cut their own road through the wces, are entirely true. The statement that General Cox acted independently of orders, or in violat
4 Twentieth Army Corps. Colonel Benjamin Harrison, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel McManis 8 399 407   Second Battalion Major Haskins 6 304 310 717   Lieutenant-Colonel Banning, commanding.         Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry Captain Henderson 9 316 325   Third Battery, Fourteenth A. C. Major Roatch 8 311 319 644 Seventeenth Army Corps. Colonel A. G. Malloy, commanding.         Field and Staff   3   3   Twentieth Illinois Battery Captain C. C. Cox 1 126 127   Thirtieth Illinois Battery Captain J. Kemmitzer 1 208 209   Thirteenth Iowa Infantry Captain C. Haskins 1 186 187   Third Battery, Twentieth A. C. Captain Hurlbut 6 290 296 822 Total 55 2922 2977 2977 December 11. My command was increased on and after the sixth instant by the assignment of recruits arriving from the rear, amounting in the aggregate to two thousand three hundred and twenty-seven enlisted men, which were properly armed and dis
command. commanding officer. officers. men. aggregate. total. Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel F. W. Lister 8 526 534   Second Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel William O'Brien 4 256 260 794 Twentieth Army Corps. Colonel Benjamin Harrison, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel McManis 8 399 407   Second Battalion Major Haskins 6 304 310 717   Lieutenant-Colonel Banning, commanding.         Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry Captain Henderson 9 316 325   Third Battery, Fourteenth A. C. Major Roatch 8 311 319 644 Seventeenth Army Corps. Colonel A. G. Malloy, commanding.         Field and Staff   3   3   Twentieth Illinois Battery Captain C. C. Cox 1 126 127   Thirtieth Illinois Battery Captain J. Kemmitzer 1 208 209   Thirteenth Iowa Infantry Captain C. Haskins 1 186 187   Third Battery, Twentieth A. C. Captain Hurlbut 6 290 296 822
tend beyond the enemy's main force; that of General Cox, however, encountered opposition. The Sande. This battery was posted on the right of General Cox's division. A short time before the battn advanced. Soon after the Third division (General Cox) left his position and began to follow up tand wounded. During the preceding night, General Cox's division, of the Twenty-third corps, was s not yet been developed. The rebel cavalry in Cox's front consisted of two divisions, commanded bfore four, General Schofield sent orders to General Cox to have his skirmish line in readiness, andy A, Twelfth Kentucky infantry, Bird's brigade, Cox's division, Twenty-third Army Corps. The sato make a charge upon the enemy's works. General Cox, with staff, was on the field, and gave dir day long to be remembered by the troops of General Cox's command. Sherman's troops have advanceo relieve the brigade of Colonel Reilly, of General Cox's division of the Twenty-third Army Corps. [4 more...]
on our intrenched position, but was repulsed with severe loss, and fell back during the night. On the fourteenth the Neuse river was crossed and Kinston occupied, and on the twenty-first Goldsboroa was entered. The column from Wilmington reached Cox's bridge, on the Neuse river, ten miles above Goldsboroa, on the twenty-second. By the first of February General Sherman's whole army was in motion from Savannah. He captured Columbia, South Carolina, on the seventeenth; thence moved on Goldsbnty-first the enemy retreated to Smithfield, leaving his dead and wounded in our hands. From there Sherman continued to Goldsboroa, which place had been occupied by General Schofield on the 21st (crossing the Neuse river ten miles above there, at Cox's bridge, where General Terry had got possession and thrown a pontoon bridge, on the twenty-second), thus forming a junction with the columns from Newbern and Wilmington. Among the important fruits of this campaign was the fall of Charleston, S
out one hundred and twenty men of the Thirty-ninth Missouri volunteer infantry, raw recruits, and, after stampeding their horses, shot every man, most of them in cold blood. Anderson, a few days later, was recognized by General Price, at Boonville, as a Confederate captain, and, with a verbal admonition to behave himself, ordered, by Colonel McLane, chief of Price's staff, to proceed to North Missouri and destroy the railroads, which orders were found on the miscreant when killed by Lieutenant-Colonel Cox, about the twenty-seventh of October ultimo. On the twenty-eighth, when information of Ewing's fight and Price's presence at Pilot Knob came to hand, General Smith, discovering the enemy in his front, moving to west and north, in pursuance of his orders to hold the most advanced position compatible with the certainty of keeping between the enemy and St. Louis,determined to leave De Soto and retire behind the Meramec, a stream which, at from ten to fifteen miles south of St. Louis
officer and seven men captured. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, D. E. Livermore, Major Commanding Third Volunteer Ohio Cavalry. Major Robert Burns, A. A. A. G., Second Brigade, Second Division C. E., M. D. M. headquarters Third Ohio Volunteer cavalry, Macon, Georgia, April 30, 1865. Major — I have the honor to forward herewith the battle-flag of the Twelfth Mississippi cavalry, Confederate States of America, which was captured, with the commanding officer of the regiment, Major Cox, on the fifteenth instant, about six miles from Tuskegee, Alabama by John H. Shoup, private, Company H, Third Ohio cavalry. He is very desirous of retaining it, if he can be allowed to do so, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, D. E. Livermore, Major Commanding Regiment. headquarters Fourth Ohio Volunteer cavalry, Selma, Alabama, April 5, 1865. Major — I have the honor to report that this regiment was not engaged in the action of the first instant. On the second ins
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
r, com.; med. offi., Charles Mann; members, 17. Camp 188. Frankfort, Ky.; A. W. Macklin, com. Camp 189. Grenada, Miss.; J. W. Young, com.; med. offi., Dr. G. W. Trimbell; 1st lieut.; members, 23; disabled, 3; deaths, 3. Camp 190. Rolling Fork, Miss.; J. C. Hall, corn. Camp 191. Charleston, Ark.; A. S. Cabell, corn. Camp 192. Centre Point, Ark. Camp 193. Lake Providence, La.; J. C. Bass, corn. Camp 194. Greenwood, Ark.; Dudley Milburn, com. Camp 195. Oakville, Texas; C. C. Cox, com.; members, 24; deaths, 1. Camp 196. Thibodeaux, La.; Maj. S. T. Grisamore, corn.; members, 60; diaabled, 2. Camp 197. Houston, Texas; Will. Lambert, com.; med. offi., R. G. Turner; surgeon; members, 140; disabled, 2; deaths, 2; Home, Austin, Texas. Camp 198. Emma, Texas; Jno. W. Murray, com. Camp 199. Hackett City, Ark.; L. B. Lake, corn. Camp 200. Norment, Tex.; T. J. Johnson, com. Camp 200. Mt. Sterling, Ark.; Thomas Johnson, corn. Camp 202. Alma, Ark.; James
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
tend further. Hill's reputation as a soldier depends in nowise upon successful running. This final retreat was the first and last in which he took a leading part. When once more his foot was planted upon the soil of North Carolina, it was eminently fitting that he who heard the first victorious shouts of her first regiment in the first fight in Virginia, should lead her brave sons in the last charge of the grand army of the great west within her own borders. Again, as in the last onset of Cox at Appomattox, North Carolina soldiers stood the highest test of the hero by facing danger in a gallant charge when they knew that all hope of success was gone forever. Last years—true character. The last years of General Hill's life were devoted to journalism and to teaching. As the editor of The Land We Love, and subsequently of The Southern Home, he wielded a trenchant pen, and was a potent factor in putting down the post-bellum statesmen who proposed to relegate to the shades of pr
Convention was already in hand to get up a new free States government for Maryland. Directly it was announced that the emancipation constitution had been called, this convention met and nominated Thomas Swan, of Baltimore, for Governor, and Dr. C. C. Cox, of Talbot county, for Lieutenant-Governor. A letter from Baltimore says: Mr. Swann's past career in the State and city is well known as president for a long while of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad when it was being pushed through to t first holding back on the emancipation subject, and committing himself to a gradual system, he finally went over to the radicals under the pressure and exigency of immediate action, and secures a nomination which is equivalent to an election.--Dr. Cox is medical director here, and resides in Talbot county. Hon. Alexander Randall, of Annapolis, was nominated. for Attorney-General of the State, Robert J. Jump, of Caroline, for Comptroller, and Hon. Daniel Weisel for Judge of the Court of Appea