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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 87 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 62 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 57 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 52 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 39 13 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 26 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 21 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Jacob D. Cox or search for Jacob D. Cox in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
that several attempts to drive him away were repulsed with bloody loss. The fact is, near night of the 14th, forty or fifty skirmishers in front of our extreme left were driven from the slight elevation they occupied, In his published Narrative General Johnston says: On riding from the right to the left, after nightfall, I learned that Lieutenant-General Polk's advanced troops had been driven from a hill in front of his left, which commanded our bridges at short range. And General J. D. Cox, in his volume Atlanta (Charles Scribner's Sons), says: Between 5 and 6 o'clock Logan [of McPherson] ordered forward the brigades of Generals Giles A. Smith and C. R. Woods, supported by Veatch's division from Dodge's corps. The height held by Polk was carried, and the position intrenched under a galling artillery and musketry fire from the enemy's principal lines. During the evening Polk made a vigorous effort to retake the position, but was repulsed, McPherson sending forward L
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
(at Kenesaw from July llth), Capt. Francis Seaman; 15th Ohio, Lieut. James Burdick. Army of the Ohio (Twenty-third Corps), Maj.-Gen. John M. Schofield, Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox (temporarily May 26th and 27th), Maj.-Gen. John M. Schofield. Escort: G, 7th Ohio Cav., Capt. John A. Ashbury. first division, Discontinued August B. F. Denning, Lieut. E. W. Nicholson; F, 1st Mich., Capt. Byron D. Paddock, Lieut. Marshall M. Miller; 19th Ohio, Capt. J. C. Shields. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox, Col. James W. Reilly temporarily May 26-27), Brig.-Gen. J. D. Cox. First Brigade, Col. James W. Reilly, Col. James W. Gault, Brig.-Gen. James W. ReillBrig.-Gen. J. D. Cox. First Brigade, Col. James W. Reilly, Col. James W. Gault, Brig.-Gen. James W. Reilly: 112th Ill. (joined May 11th, and transferred to Third Brigade August 11th), Col. Thomas J. Henderson, Lieut.-Col. Emery S. Bond, Maj. T. T. Dow, Col. T. J. Henderson, Maj. T. T. Dow; 16th Ky. (joined May 11th, and transferred to Third Brigade August llth), Col. James W. Gault, Maj. John S. White, Col. James W. Gault, Maj. J. S.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
of Palmer and Hooker, came next; and then that brave young officer, Cox, commanding the Twenty-third Corps, against a storm of bullets and s May, bright and clear, showed us a country picturesque Major-General Jacob D. Cox. From a photograph. in its natural features, with farm s way during the night to Sherman's bivouac, so that; for a few days Cox took his command. Cox, with his Twenty-third Corps, and Palmer withCox, with his Twenty-third Corps, and Palmer with the Fourteenth, swung in beyond me, as my men were moving up carefully into their usual positions in line of battle. Now the enemy kept strvision, supported by R. W. Johnson's, and connected with the army by Cox on my right. At Pickett's Mill, believing I had reached the extremen of the cannon. From Kenesaw I ordered the Twenty-third Corps (General Cox) to march due west on the Burnt Hickory road, and to burn housesout 4 P. M. For a time I attributed this result to the effect of General Cox's march, but later in the afternoon the signal-flag announced th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
d in turn, filed off to the left of the road, and was also disposed in line of battle. The artillery was instructed to take no part in the engagement, on account of the danger to which women and children in the village would be exposed. General J. D. Cox has pointed out that the reports confirm his own observation that Hood's artillery was used in the battle.--editors. General Forrest was ordered to post cavalry on both flanks, and, if the assault proved successful, to complete the ruin of ecretary of War: The enemy claim that we lost thirty colors in the fight at Franklin. We lost thirteen, capturing nearly the same number. The men who bore ours were killed on or within the enemy's interior line of works. J. B. H. General J. D. Cox states in his Franklin and Nashville that the capture of 22 colors by Reilly and 10 by Opdycke was officially reported and verified at the time.--editors. I was therefore well aware of our inability to attack the Federals in their new stron
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The death of Generals Cleburne and Adams. (search)
d hard to save the life of General John Adams, of Mississippi. Colonel Stewart called to our men not to fire on him, but it was too late. Adams rode his horse over the ditch to the top of the parapet, undertook to grasp the old flag from the hands of our color-sergeant, when he fell, horse and all, shot by the color-guard. I was a reenlisted veteran, and went through twenty-seven general engagements, but I am sure that Franklin was the hardest-fought field that I ever stood upon. General J. D. Cox [in his Franklin and Nashville ] censures General Wagner for holding to his advanced position too long, calls his action a gross blunder, etc.; but, as one of Cox's men, I looked upon the matter in a different light. I think if Cleburne had not struck Wagner's two brigades as he did that his brave lads would have broken our line successfully; but, as it was, his men were badly winded with his work with Wagner, which gave Opdycke's and White's men a better chance to check him at the c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
eneral Hatch, and by the orders of General Thomas, who, on the 20th, had directed General Schofield to prepare to fall back to Columbia, the two divisions of General J. D. Cox and General George D. Wagner (the latter Newton's old division) were ordered to march to Lynnville — about half-way to Columbia — on the 22d. On the 23d theCorps, told General Schofield that he believed he could carry the hill in his front, but doubted if he could hold it without assistance. The ground in front of General Cox, on Couch's right, also offered grand opportunities for a successful assault. Meantime the cavalry, on Cox's right, had made its way beyond the extreme left flCox's right, had made its way beyond the extreme left flank of the enemy, and was moving northward over the wooded hills direct to the rear of the extreme rebel left. General Thomas, who had been making a reconnoissance, had no sooner reached Schofield's front than General McArthur, who commanded one of Smith's divisions, impatient at the long waiting, and not wanting to spend the se
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
infantry as well as cavalry, were widely scattered. They were the remnants of three armies, and although the supreme command had been conferred on Thomas, a host in himself, aided by such able lieutenants as Generals Stanley, Schofield, Steedman, Cox, and Thomas J. Wood, and finally by A. J. Smith, it was by no means certain that their forces could be welded into an efficient army in time to check the onset of Hood's fleet-footed and fiercely aggressive veterans. On the 19th of November thenk. The battle of Franklin occurred the next day, and, as is well known, resulted in a signal victory for the National arms, and also in irreparable loss of men and officers to Hood's gallant army. On the Union side the heroes were Stanley and Cox and Opdycke. Their prompt action neutralized the faults of others, and wrested victory from the intrepid Cleburne and his no less intrepid companions. One important circumstance connected with this battle has been persistently dwarfed or negle
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
l. Charles A. Zollinger; 23d Mich., Col. Oliver L. Spaulding; 111th Ohio, Col. Isaac R. Sherwood; 118th Ohio, Maj. Edgar Sowers. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 34 == 36. Third Brigade, Col. John Mehringer: 91st Ind., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Butterfield; 123d Ind., Col. John C. McQuiston; 50th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Hamilton S. Gillespie; 183d Ohio, Col. George W. Hoge. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 20 ==22. Artillery: 15th Ind., Capt. Alonzo D. Harvey; 19th Ohio, Capt. Frank Wilson. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox. First Brigade, Col. Charles C. Doolittle: 12th Ky., Col. Laurence H. Rousseau; 16th Ky., Capt. Jacob Miller; 100th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Edwin L. Hayes; 104th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Oscar W. Sterl; 8th Tenn., Capt. James W. Berry. Brigade loss: w, 5. Second Brigade, Col. John S. Casement: 65th Ill., Lieut.-Col. W. Scott Stewart; 65th Ind., Lieut.-Col. John W. Hammond; 124th Ind., Col. John M. Orr; 103d Ohio, Capt. Henry S. Pickands; 5th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. Nathaniel Witt. Brigade loss: w,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations in east Tennessee and south-west Virginia. (search)
re widely scattered over the country in order to obtain subsistence, and before they could be concentrated the enemy had retreated across the mountains into Kentucky. The raiders were prevented from occupying Bristol and doing further damage by the timely arrival of General Marshall's force, which pursued to Jonesville. In May, 1862, a much larger invading force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, numbering several thousand, was led up the Kanawha and New rivers, West Virginia, by General J. D. Cox. This column was met at Princeton, in Mercer County, and arrested by General Marshall in an engagement on the 16th of May, which resulted in the repulse and retreat of the invading force, whose killed and wounded were left behind. [See Vol. II., p. 280.] On the 3d of September, 1863, Burnside occupied Knoxville, Tennessee, with his army corps. General J. M. Shaekelford commanded Burnside's cavalry force in the Knoxville campaign.--editors. Nearly all the available Confederate
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the Monocacy, Md.: July 9th, 1864. (search)
Dungan; 10th, 23d, and 37th Va. Steuart's brigade), Lieut.-Col. S. H. Saunders. Breckinridge's division, Composition not clearly indicated. Brig.-Gen. John Echols. [Consisted of Echols's, Wharton's, and Vaughn's brigades, the latter being dismounted cavalry.] Rodes's division, Maj.-Gen. B. E. Bodes. Grimes's Brigade. 32d N. C.,----43d N. C.,----; 45th N. C.,----; 53d N. C.,----; 2d N. C. Batt'n,----. Cook's Brigade. 4th Ga.,----; 12th Ga.,----; 21st Ga.,----; 44th Ga.,----. Cox's Brigade: 1st N. C.,----; 2d N. C.----; 3d N. C.,----; 4th N. C.,----; 14th N. C.,----; 30th N. C.,----. Battle's Brigade: 3d Ala.,----; 5th Ala.,----; 6th Ala.,----; 12th Ala.,----; 61st Ala.,----. Ramseur's division, Maj.-Gen. S. D. Ramseur. Lilley's Brigade: 13th Va.,----; 31st Va.,----; 49th Va.,----; 52d Va.,----; 58th Va.,----. Johnston's Brigade. 5th N. C.,----; 12th N. C.,----; 20th N. C.,----; 23d N. C.,----. Lewis's Brigade: 6th N. C.,----; 21st N. C.,----; 54th N. C.,----;
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