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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 12, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.63 (search)
the crew, with store-rooms on the sides. in leaving the top plate of the pilot-house loose, so as to be readily pushed up from below, was that of affording egress to the crew in case of accident. Had the monitor Tecumseh, commanded by Captain T. A. M. Craven, when struck by a torpedo during the conflict in Mobile Bay, August 5th, 1864, been provided with a similar loose plate over the main hatch, the fearful calamity of drowning officers and crew would have been prevented. In referring to t the hull: an opening in the turret-floor, when placed above a corresponding opening in the deck, formed a free passage to the turret, the top of which was provided with sliding hatches. Apparently the officer in charge of the turret-gear of Captain Craven's vessel was not at his post, as he ought to have been during action, or else he had not been taught the imperative duty of placing the turret in such a position that these openings would admit of a free passage from below. Under the circu
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
retense that she had been chartered by the Portuguese Government. When twenty miles from Lisbon, she was captured by the United States steam-frigate Niagara, Captain Craven, who took her to England, and landed her crew at Dover. No one seemed willing to question the correctness of the transaction, and that was the last of the GeCommander W. P. McCann; Itasca, Lieutenant-Commander George Brown, and Galena, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Wells. The ironclad vessels were the Tecumseh, Commander T. A. M. Craven; Manhattan, Commander T. W. A. Nicholson; Winnebago, Commander T. H. Stevens, and Chickasaw, Lieutenant-Commander T. H. Perkins. while a land force, abouh exploded directly under her turret, making a great chasm, into which the water rushed in such volume that she sunk in a few seconds, carrying down with her commander Craven and nearly all of his officers and crew. Only seventeen, of one hundred and thirty, were saved. the Brooklyn recoiled at the appalling apparition before
T. A. Dornin, with a cargo of 750 Africans on board, 616 of which were delivered to the United States agent at Monrovia. Brig Tuccoa, captured on the coast of Cuba, Dec. 20, 1860, by the United States steamer Mohawk, Lieutenant Commanding T. A. M. Craven. Bark Mary Kimball, captured on the coast of Cuba, Dec. 21, 1860, by the United States steamer Mohawk, Lieutenant Commanding T. A. M. Craven. Ship Nightingale, captured on the coast of Africa, April 21, 1861, by the United States sloopT. A. M. Craven. Ship Nightingale, captured on the coast of Africa, April 21, 1861, by the United States sloop-of-war Saratoga, Commander Alfred Taylor, with 961 Africans on board, 801 of which were delivered to the United States agent at Monrovia. The Cora and Nightingale were sent to New York; the Bonita to Charleston, and subsequently to Savannah; and the Tuccoa and Mary Kimball to Key West, and delivered into the custody of the proper officers. conclusion. In discharging the duties that pertain to this Department, and which have devolved upon it during the brief period it has been intrust
nd in the rear of that fort, and I assigned Lieutenant Commander De Krafft, of the Conemaugh, to that duty. On the first instant General Granger visited me again on the Hartford. In the mean time the Tecumseh had arrived at Pensacola, and Captain Craven had informed me that he would be ready in four days for any service. We therefore fixed upon the fourth of August as the day for the landing of the troops and my entrance into the bay; but owing to delays mentioned in Captain Jenkins's commu, Lieutenant Commander W. P. McCann; Ossipee, Commander W. E. Le Roy, with the Itasca, Lieutenant Commander George Brown; Oneida, Commander I. R. M. Mullany, with the Galena, Lieutenant Commander C. H. Wells. The iron-clads — Tecumseh, Commander T. A. M. Craven; the Manhattan, Commander I. W. A. Nicholson; the Winnebago, Commander T. H. Stevens; and the Chickasaw, Lieutenant Commander G. H. Perkins--were already inside the bar, and had been ordered to take up their positions on the starboard s
the safety of a boat's crew. When nearly abreast of Fort Morgan, and about one hundred and fifty yards from the beach, a row of buoys was discovered stretching from the shore, a distance from one to two hundred yards. It being reported to Captain Craven, he immediately gave the vessel full speed, and attempted to pass between two of them. When in their range, a torpedo was exploded directly under the turret, blowing a large hole through the bottom of the vessel, through which the water rushrowning condition by one of our boats, manned by the following men: S. S. Shinn, Gunner's Mate; John Gould, Quarter-Gunner; Frank Commens, seaman; Richard Collins, seaman; and Peter Parkes, landsman, all of whom are now on board this ship. Captain Craven was seen in the turret by Mr. Cottrell, just before the vessel sunk, and as he had a life-preserving vest on, we have hopes that he reached the shore. Not recovering from our exhausted condition until the boat was abreast of the Hartford,
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
'clock in the morning, Farragut's powerful fleet of eighteen vessels entered the main channel. The Federal ships were all thoroughbred war vessels; not a single one but what was built for the service. They swept on to the attack with four monitors in the starboard column, close inshore. As they passed the Fort and water batteries, where the Brooklyn and Richmond came very nearly going aground, they completely smothered the Confederate fire. The Tecumseh, under the command of Captain T. A. M. Craven, was sunk by a torpedo as the fleet advanced. Admiral Farragut, unable to see through the smoke, went up the mainmast almost as high as the maintop. While here, a quartermaster fastened a rope around him to keep him from falling. But if deeds of bravery are to be mentioned in telling of Mobile Bay, much credit must be given to the small Confederate gunboats, Morgan, Gaines, and Selma, that kept up a raking fire which caused great havoc among the advancing vessels. To the great
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Navy of the United States (search)
nboatI.44S.b2 Urdaneta42GunboatI.44S.b2 b, Estimated. d, Torpedo tubes. Cushing (No. 1)105Torpedo-boatS.1,720T. S.d3 Ericsson (No. 2)120Torpedo-boatS.1,800T. S.d3 Foote (No. 3)142Torpedo-boatS.2,000T. S.d3 Rodgers (No. 4)142Torpedo-boatS.2,000T. S.d3 Winslow (No. 5)142Torpedo-boatS.2,000T. S.d3 Porter (No. 6)165Torpedo-boatS.b3,400T. S.d3 Dupont (No. 7)165Torpedo-boatS.b3,400T. S.d3 Rowan (No. 8)182Torpedo-boatS.3,200T. S.d3 Dahlgren (No. 9)146Torpedo-boatS.4,200T. S.d2 T. A. M. Craven (No 10)146Torpedo-boatS.4,200T. S.d2 Farragut (No. 11)273Torpedo-boatS.5,600T. S.d2 Davis (No. 12)132Torpedo-boatS.1,750T. S.d3 Fox (No. 13)132Torpedo-boatS.1,750T. S.d3 Morris (No. 14)105Torpedo-boatS.1,750T. S.d3 Talbot (No. 15)46 1/2Torpedo-boatS.850T. S.d2 Gwin (No. 16)46Torpedo-boatS.850S.d2 Mackenzie (No. 17)65Torpedo-boatS.850S.d2 McKee (No. 18)65Torpedo-boatS.850S.d2 Somers (No. 22)145Torpedo-boatS.1,900S.d2 Manly (No. 23)b30Torpedo-boa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
Mary and back to the mountains had coalesced in the conspiracy, and before the people of Charleston had any intimation of danger, 100 white victims had been slain in the remote settlements. The Creeks, Yamasees, and Apalachians in the South had confederated with the Cherokees, Catawbas, and Congarees in the West, in all about 6,000 strong, while more than 1,000 warriors issued from the Neuse region to avenge their misfortunes in the war of 1712-13. The people were filled with terror. Governor Craven acted with the utmost wisdom and energy. He declared the province to be under martial law, and at the head of 1,200 men, black and white, he marched to meet the foe. The Indians were at first victorious, but after several bloody encounters the Southern warriors were driven across the Savannah River (May, 1715), and halted not until they found refuge under the Spanish guns at St. Augustine. The Cherokees and their northern neighbors had not yet engaged in the war, and they wearily ret
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
at the commencement of tho fight, struck by a torpedo, went to her fate at the bottom of the gulf, where she still lies. Sunk with her was her chivalric commander T. A. M. Craven; the pilot, an engineer, and two seamen were the only survivors picked up by the Federal boats, and they were on duty in the turret. The pilot, whom I s afterward conversed with at Pensacola, on the subject, told me that when the vessel careened, so that water began to run into the mouth of the turret, he and Captain Craven were on the ladder together, the captain on the top step, with the way open for his easy and honorable escape; the pilot said: Go ahead, captain! No, sir, replied Craven; after you, pilot! I leave my ship last! Upon this the pilot sprung up, and the gallent Craven went down, sucked under in the vortex, thus sacrificing himself through a chivalric sense of duty. There was a dead silence on board the Tennessee; the men peered through the port holes at the awful catastrophe, and spo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
roled, 266. Confederate, who led a Federal charge, A. 297. Confederate Flag, Return of General Maury's, 263. Confederate Soldier, Humor of the, 313. Confederate Veterans, United; General Gordon's Address to, 175;Homes for in the South, 313. Confederacy, Last Days of the, 329; Prices in the, 329; Social Life in the, 380; Disparity of numbers and resources with the North, 413. Conrad Dr. D. B., 72, 82, 93. Cooke, General John R., 115 Corinth, Battle of, 195. Craven, Captain T. A. M., 73. Crook, Capture of General George, 186. Curry, Dr. J. L. M., 125. Dabney, D. D., Rev. A. L., 376. Daniel, Hon., John. W., 406. Darr, Colonel, Joseph, 57. Davis House, Jeff., History of, 326. Davis, Jefferson, 303, 305, 335; His character, 406. D, Company, Eighteenth Virginia; war roll of, 120. Delaware, Fort, Prisoners at, 35, 46. Dillon, Colonel, Edward, 198. Donelson, Reminiscences of Fort, 372. Drewry's Bluff, Battle of, 100. Drummond, Governor of
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