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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 176 4 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 21 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Crawford or search for Thomas Crawford in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
rd built on the corner of Bond Street and Broadway was still standing in the middle of the nineteenth century; a dignified mansion of brick, with columns and trimmings of white marble. In her Reminiscences, our mother recalls the spacious rooms, hung with red, blue, and yellow silk. The yellow drawing-room was reserved for high occasions, and for Miss Ward's desk and grand piano. This and the blue room were adorned by fine sculptured mantelpieces, the work of a young sculptor named Thomas Crawford, who was just coming into notice. Behind the main house, stretching along Broadway, was the picture gallery, the first private one in New York, and Mr. Ward's special pride. The children might not mingle in frivolous gayety abroad, but they should have all that love, taste, and money could give them at home; he filled his gallery with the best pictures he could find. A friend (Mr. Prescott Hall), making a timely journey through Spain, bought for him many valuable pictures,! among
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
cast upon her in that first moment. Yet she says of that Rome of 1843, A great gloom and silence hung over it. The houses were cold, and there were few conveniences; but Christmas found the Howes established in the Via San Niccolo da Tolentino, as comfortably as might be. Here they were joined by Louisa Ward, and here they soon gathered round them a delightful circle of friends. Most of the forestieri of Rome in those days were artists; among those who came often to the house were Thomas Crawford, Luther Terry, Freeman the painter and his wife, and Ttirmer, who painted a portrait of Julia. The winter passed like a dream. There were balls as gorgeous as those of London, with the beautiful Princess Torlonia in place of the Duchess of Sutherland; musical parties, at which Diva sang to the admiration of all. There were visits to the galleries, where George Combe was of the party, and where he and the Chevalier studied the heads of statues and busts from the point of view of phreno
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
loomy, that one really deserves credit for not hanging oneself! ... I passed last evening with--. Chev was going to a 'versary, left me there at about seven, and did not come for me until after ten. Consequence was, I got heartily tired of the whole family, and concluded that bright people without hearts were in the long run less agreeable than good gentle people without wits — glory on my soul, likewise also on my baby's soul, which I am! To her sister Louisa Louisa Ward married Thomas Crawford in 1844, and lived thereafter in Rome. South Boston, November, 1845. My darling Wevie, The children have been so very obliging as to go to sleep, and having worried over them all day, and part of the evening, I will endeavor to give you what is left of it. When you become the mother of two children you will understand the value of time as you never understood it before. My days and nights are pretty much divided between Julia and Florence. I sleep with the baby, nurse her all night
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
ski in a Nocturne of Chopin's for violin and piano. All went well. Our pleasure and fatigue were both great. The house looked charming. In the autumn came a lecture tour, designed to recoup the heavy expenses of the Eastern trip. Never skilful in matters of money-making, this tour was undertaken with less preparation than the modern lecturer could well imagine. She corresponded with I Luther Terry, an American painter who had lived long in Rome, and had been a close friend of Thomas Crawford. He survived his wife by some years. one and another Unitarian clergyman and arranged her lectures largely through them. Though she did not bring back so much money as many less popular speakers, she was, after all, her own mistress, and was not rushed through the country like a letter by ambitious managers. The Journal gives some glimpses of this trip. Twenty minutes to dress, sup, and get to the hall. Swallowed a cup of tea and nibbled a biscuit as I dressed myself. Foun
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
er Eleanor read Plato's Dialogues to him. Was unconscious at the last. Poor dear Marion! The end, in his case, comes early. His father was, I think, in the early forties when he died of a cancer behind the eye which caused blindness. He, Thomas Crawford, had a long and very distressing illness. Crawford had been very dear to her, ever since the days when, a radiant schoolboy, he came and went in his vacations. There was a complete sympathy and understanding between them, and there were Crawford had been very dear to her, ever since the days when, a radiant schoolboy, he came and went in his vacations. There was a complete sympathy and understanding between them, and there were few people whom she enjoyed more. I wrote a letter to be read, if approved, to-morrow evening at the Faneuil Hall meeting held to advocate the revision of our extradition treaty with the Russian Government, which at present seems to allow that government too much latitude of incrimination, whereby political and civil offences can too easily be confused and a revolutionist surrendered as a criminal, which he may or may not be. Later in the month she writes:-- In the early morning I bega
ram, R. A., II, 156. Cramer, J. B., I, 43. Crawford, Annie, see Rabe. Crawford, Eleanor, II, 389. Crawford, F. Marion, I, 130, 254, 255, 362; II, 28, 31, 65, 69-71, 80, 81, 84, 240, 362, 376, 389. Crawford, Mrs. F. M., II, 240. Crawford, Harold, II, 240. Crawford, Louisa W., I, 18, 19, 30, 34, 35, 58, 59, 70, 78, 79, 95, 103, 115, 118, 130, 134. Letters to, I, 81, 84, 88, 92, 110, 111, 113-17, 119-22, 125-29, 130, 131, 155-59, 168, 170-72, see also Terry, Louisa. Crawford, Thomas, I, 41, 95, 115; II, 55, 389. Crete, I, 260-62, 264, 275-77, 278, 287; II, 43, 44. 225, 394. Crimea, I, 294. Crimean War, II, 189. Critic, N. Y., II, 66. Crothers, S. McC., II, 320. Crusaders, II, 15. Cuba, I, 173, 176, 177, 326. Cuckson, Mr., II, 203. Cumberland Lakes, I, 92. Curiel, Seflor, I, 324. Curtis, G. W., I, 143, 159, 160; II, 93. Letter of, II, 147. Cushing, Mr., II, 74, 75. Cushing, Louisa, I, 227. Cushman, Charlotte, I, 204, I, 345.