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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 241 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 222 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 141 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 141 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 131 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 86 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 80 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 68 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 54 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George Crook or search for George Crook in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 4 document sections:

nd unfaltering attention to the wounded. Col. George Crook, Commanding Brigade. General Fremontbrigade of Gen. Cox's division, commanded by Col. Crook, was attacked yesterday morning at Lewisburg-fourth Ohio regiments, under command of Col. George Crook, Acting Brigadier-General, and three tho's right and left; but, nothing intimidated, Col. Crook ordered the Thirty-sixth to march to attack were mortally wounded, and died that night. Col. Crook, of the Thirty-sixth, being in command of thbrave, thorough, and accomplished officer as Col. Crook, be made a real instead of a nominal Brigadird provisional brigade, under command of Col. George Crook, had a battle at this place yesterday moousand five hundred to three thousand men. Colonel Crook sent out companies G of the Thirty-sixth arilled regiments in the Mountain Department. Col. Crook of the Thirty-sixth regiment is a regular We of our artillery against them. Last week Col. Crook marched a part of his brigade some fifty mil[4 more...]
y considerable force. The Second brigade, Colonel Crook commanding, consisting of the Eleventh, Tw as follows: The right front to be occupied by Crook's brigade of the Kanawha division, supported i head of the bridge. The column on the right (Crook's brigade of the Kanawha division, supported bstream and warmly engaged the enemy across it. Crook's brigade in moving forward was brought under vision, were ordered up. About the same time Col. Crook of the Second brigade, Kanawha division, suc before them. This division was followed by Col. Crook's brigade, of the Kanawha division, which towing the division of Sturgis was in front, and Crook's brigade in support of it — the order being r his whole division in line and supported by Col. Crook--was ordered to move on Sharpsburgh, which lt enthusiasm. On the right, Gen. Wilcox and Col. Crook quickly repulsed the enemy and drove back th's staff, for coolness and efficiency; Colonels George Crook, commanding Second brigade, and Hugh E
agerstown turnpike, toward the positions of the enemy in the pass of South-Mountain. The First brigade of the division, Colonel E. P. Scammon commanding, consisting of the Twelfth, Twenty-third, and Thirtieth Ohio regiments, and McMullin's Ohio battery, was ordered to proceed by the Boonsboro road, running to the left of the Hagerstown turnpike, and to feel the enemy, ascertaining whether the crest of South-Mountain on that side was held by any considerable force. The Second brigade, Colonel Crook commanding, consisting of the Eleventh, Twenty-eighth, and Thirty-sixth Ohio regiments, and Simmons's battery, with Schambeck's cavalry troop, was ordered to follow on the same road, to support the First brigade. It soon became evident the enemy held the crest in considerable force, and the whole division was ordered to advance to the assault of the position, word being received from Major-General Reno that the column would be supported by the whole corps. Two twenty-pounder Parrott
d were as follows: The right front to be occupied by Crook's brigade of the Kanawha division, supported in rearom the head of the bridge. The column on the right (Crook's brigade of the Kanawha division, supported by Sturo the stream and warmly engaged the enemy across it. Crook's brigade in moving forward was brought under so livme division, were ordered up. About the same time Col. Crook of the Second brigade, Kanawha division, succeedeenemy before them. This division was followed by Col. Crook's brigade, of the Kanawha division, which took poright wing the division of Sturgis was in front, and Crook's brigade in support of it — the order being reverseght — his whole division in line and supported by Col. Crook--was ordered to move on Sharpsburgh, which lay ab great enthusiasm. On the right, Gen. Wilcox and Col. Crook quickly repulsed the enemy and drove back their acammon's staff, for coolness and efficiency; Colonels George Crook, commanding Second brigade, and Hugh Ewing,