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ols, colleges, churches, hotels, and large mansions were all utilized for this purpose. Chesapeake Hospital in Hampton, Virginia, and Corona Hospital in Corinth, Mississippi, were female colleges before they were used as hospitals. At the Chesapeake about 700 wounded prisoners taken in the Seven Days were treated. Corona College, Corinth, Mississippi Officers' hospital, Nashville, Tennessee McPherson hospital, Vicksburg, Mississippi Chesapeake hospital, Hampton, Virginia Mansion house hospital, Alexandria, Virginia U. S. Marine hospital, Evansville, Indiana Churches used as hospitals in Alexandria Friends' meeting-house, capacity 100 St. Paul's church, capacity 120 Baptist church, capacity 150 Grace church, capacity 75 Lyceum hall, capacity 80 Christ church, episcopal Private residences used as hospitals, Alexandria, Virginia. Prince street, West of Columbus, capacity 95 Corner of king and water streets, capacity 160
ols, colleges, churches, hotels, and large mansions were all utilized for this purpose. Chesapeake Hospital in Hampton, Virginia, and Corona Hospital in Corinth, Mississippi, were female colleges before they were used as hospitals. At the Chesapeake about 700 wounded prisoners taken in the Seven Days were treated. Corona College, Corinth, Mississippi Officers' hospital, Nashville, Tennessee McPherson hospital, Vicksburg, Mississippi Chesapeake hospital, Hampton, Virginia Mansion house hospital, Alexandria, Virginia U. S. Marine hospital, Evansville, Indiana Churches used as hospitals in Alexandria Friends' meeting-house, capacity 100 St. Paul's church, capacity 120 Baptist church, capacity 150 Grace church, capacity 75 Lyceum hall, capacity 80 Christ church, episcopal Private residences used as hospitals, Alexandria, Virginia. Prince street, West of Columbus, capacity 95 Corner of king and water streets, capacity 160
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
ction to our sitting down together, but he did not know but some of the passengers would object. We will go and see, said I, with my feelings somewhat roused. Happily, no objection was made. Berths were also given to us all, but it was impossible for me to sleep in so confined an atmosphere, as the cabin was small and thronged. The scenery on the route was very pretty. At 4 o'clock yesterday morning (Sunday) we arrived here, Aug. 15. Youngstown, O. and immediately came up to the Mansion House, kept by N. Andrews. It is a rum tavern, but the landlord (strange to say) is friendly to our cause, and generally entertains the abolition lecturers without charge. This world presents some queer paradoxes, and this is one of them. Yesterday, we held Aug. 15. three meetings, in a beautiful grove, which were well attended. During the day, the burden fell chiefly upon me, as Douglass was entirely exhausted and voiceless. I am afraid his old throat complaint, the swelling of the tons
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
even of the world of fashion. The little lodging-house slavey was often awed by the titles on the cards she invariably presented between a work-worn thumb and finger. It is curious to contrast the brief record of these days with that of the Peace Crusade. June 10. To morning service at the Foundling Hospital — very touching. To luncheon with M. G. D. where met the George Howards. June 15 . . . Robert operal with Richard Mansfield. June 18. Synagogue. June 19. Lord Mayor's Mansion House. I am to speak there concerning Laura Bridgman. Henry James may come to take me to St. Bart.'s Hospital. June 25. Messiah. Miss Bryce. June 26. Dined with Capt. Ward. Theatre. Justin McCarthy. June 28. Meeting in Lambeth Library. June 29. Russell Gurney's garden party. Miss Marston's, Onslow Sq., 4 P. M. Antivivisection. Met Dudley Campbell. A day of rest, indeed. I wrote out my anti-vivisection argument for to-morrow, and finished the second letter to the Chicago Tr
-62, 164-72, 184. Maine, I, 392; II, 122. Maine, Sir H. J. Sumner, I, 249, 250. Malibran, Mme. de, (Maria Felicita Garcia), I, 29; II, 270, 350. Mallock, W. H., II, 8. Mammoth Cave, II, 122. Manatt, E., II, 293. Mancini, Sig., II, 172. Manhattan, I, 243. Manila, Battle of, II, 254. Mann, Horace, I, 73, 79, 83, 94, 121, 123, 169, 185, 227. Mann, Mary P., I, 79, 80, 169. Manning, H. E., II, 165. Mansfield, I, 378. Mansfield, Richard, II, 8, 313. Mansion House, II, 8. Mapleson, Col., II, 103. Margherita, Queen, II, 30, 248, 277. Marie, Peter, II, 54, 202. Marienburg, II, 14. Mariette, A. E., II, 36. Mario (Marchese di Candia), I, 86, 87, 316; II, 250, 350. Marion, Benjamin, I, 10-12. Marion, Esther, I, 10, 12. Marion, Francis, I, 10-14; II, 351. Marion, Gabriel, I, 12. Marion, Judith, I, 11, 12. Marion, Peter, I, 12. Marne, M., I, 328. Marsaba, II, 38, 41. Marseilles, I, 97. Marshalsea, I, 83.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
, Sergt.,21st Mass. Inf.,Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., Nov. 29, 1863.Knoxville, Tenn., Dec. 2, 1863. Cummings, James T.,40th Mass. Inf.,– –Before Petersburg, Va., June 21, 1864. Curley, Patrick,28th Mass. Inf.,May 18, 1864,Wilderness, Va., May 20, 1864. Currie, Daniel D.,37th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.Wilderness, Va., May 16, 1864. Currier, Leroy S.,25th Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864.Cold Harbor, Va., July 10, 1864. Curtin, Francis,28th Mass. Inf.,June 3, 1864,Mansion House, Alexandria, Va., July 1, 1864. Curtis, Edwin, Sergt.,58th Mass. Inf.,– –Near City Point, Va., July 19, 1864. Curtis, Edwin H., Corp.,44th Mass. Inf.,– –Whitehall, N. C., Dec. 16, 1862. Curtis, George, Sergt.,1st Co. Mass. S. S.,May 18, 1864,Wilderness, Va., May 28, 1864. Curtis, Jacob,18th Mass. Inf.,Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864.Wilderness, Va., May 26, 1864. Curtis, John,55th Mass. Inf.,– –James Island, S. C., July 2, 1864. Curtis, Oscar F.,1st Mass. H. A.,– –Spotsy
, Sergt.,21st Mass. Inf.,Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., Nov. 29, 1863.Knoxville, Tenn., Dec. 2, 1863. Cummings, James T.,40th Mass. Inf.,– –Before Petersburg, Va., June 21, 1864. Curley, Patrick,28th Mass. Inf.,May 18, 1864,Wilderness, Va., May 20, 1864. Currie, Daniel D.,37th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864.Wilderness, Va., May 16, 1864. Currier, Leroy S.,25th Mass. Inf.,Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864.Cold Harbor, Va., July 10, 1864. Curtin, Francis,28th Mass. Inf.,June 3, 1864,Mansion House, Alexandria, Va., July 1, 1864. Curtis, Edwin, Sergt.,58th Mass. Inf.,– –Near City Point, Va., July 19, 1864. Curtis, Edwin H., Corp.,44th Mass. Inf.,– –Whitehall, N. C., Dec. 16, 1862. Curtis, George, Sergt.,1st Co. Mass. S. S.,May 18, 1864,Wilderness, Va., May 28, 1864. Curtis, Jacob,18th Mass. Inf.,Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864.Wilderness, Va., May 26, 1864. Curtis, John,55th Mass. Inf.,– –James Island, S. C., July 2, 1864. Curtis, Oscar F.,1st Mass. H. A.,– –Spotsy
eet, Tanners lane. The Lane passing from Water street in to Milk street, according to ye name by whch it hath been formerly known, Joylieffs lane. The way leading round ye old Meeting House, Church square. The street Leading from corn hill including ye wayes on each side of ye Town House extending easterly to ye sea, King street. The street leading from Mr Deerings Corner in Cornhill to Houchens Corner at ye uper end of Hanover street, Queen street. The way leading from ye Mansion House of ye Late Simon Lynde, Esqr by Capt Southlacks extending as far as Collo Townsends Corner, Tri-Mount street. The way Leading from Mylnes Cor., near Colla Townsends, passing through ye Comon along by Mr Sheafs into Frog Lane, Comon street. The Alley leading from ye Comon Eastly on ye North Side of Madm Ushers House, Turnagain alley. The way Leading from ye Exchange in King Street, passing by Mrs Phillips into Water Street, Pudding lane. The way Leading from King street by ye
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Agreement between the United States Government and South Carolina as to preserving the status of the Forts at Charleston. (search)
ng Anderson to return to Fort Moultrie. During the two or three days when that matter was under consideration and discussion several of the Southern Senators waited upon the President and urged him to issue the order; and without perhaps making any positive pledge that he would do so, his conversation and promises left the impression upon the minds of many of them that the order would be issued. Messrs. Hunter, of Virginia, Toombs, of Georgia, Mallory and Yulee, Davis, Slidell and Benjamin are among those who conferred with the President, and most of them after such conference were left with the impression that Anderson would be ordered back by the President. Mansion House, Greenville, S. C., September 19, 1881 The above is an accurate copy of the original statement as I took it down when given to me by Governor Orr. I sent a copy to General T. W. Crawford, and have his letter acknowledging its receipt. Ellison Capers. Christ Church Rectory, Greenville, November 20, 1883.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., Some old Medford houses and estates. (search)
heirs sold the estate in 1652 to Mr. Edward Collins of Cambridge. Mr. Collins, by deed dated August 20, 1656, sold to Mr. Richard Russell of Charlestown about 1,600 acres of land, with the mansion house and other buildings. This sale comprised all the land of the Cradock Plantation east of the following described line; viz., On the west, with a White Oak tree marked R. C., standing on the west side of a brook that runs into that part of the marshland which lyeth on the west of the said Mansion house, and from said marked tree by a direct line continued unto another White Oak tree, in like manner marked R. C., the said tree standing on the north line between Charlestown and the said plantation, on the east side of a swamp, the said line being by estimation, north and south, and the brook into which the said brook runs, is the westerly bounds of the said marsh. . . . Excepting from the above, 12 acres of the meadows lying by Mistick River, next unto the land of the said Edward Collin
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