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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
Col. R. H. Cunningham; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane (w), Capt. John E. Penn, Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 48th Va., Captain Samuel Hale (w), Maj. J. B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Garnett; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh, Maj. John Seddon. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 2; w, 14 == 16. Cross Keys and Port Republic, k, 4; w, 16 == 20. Third Brigade, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro: 10th Va., Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Col. A. G. Taliaferro, Lieut.-Col. George W. Curtis; 37th Va., Maj. T. V. Williams, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 2; w, 34==36. Port Republic, w, 3. Artillery, Col. S. Crutchfield (chief of artillery of Jackson's entire command): Va. Battery, Capt. Joseph Carpenter; Va. Battery, Capt. William H. Caskie; Va. Battery (joined at Port Republic), Capt. James McD. Carrington; Va. Battery, Capt. W. E. Cutshaw (w), Lieut. John C. Carpenter; Va. Battery, Capt. William T. Poague; Va. Battery, Capt. George W. Woodin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate Army. (search)
Col. R. H. Cunningham; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane (w), Capt. John E. Penn, Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 48th Va., Captain Samuel Hale (w), Maj. J. B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Garnett; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh, Maj. John Seddon. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 2; w, 14 == 16. Cross Keys and Port Republic, k, 4; w, 16 == 20. Third Brigade, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro: 10th Va., Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Col. A. G. Taliaferro, Lieut.-Col. George W. Curtis; 37th Va., Maj. T. V. Williams, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 2; w, 34==36. Port Republic, w, 3. Artillery, Col. S. Crutchfield (chief of artillery of Jackson's entire command): Va. Battery, Capt. Joseph Carpenter; Va. Battery, Capt. William H. Caskie; Va. Battery (joined at Port Republic), Capt. James McD. Carrington; Va. Battery, Capt. W. E. Cutshaw (w), Lieut. John C. Carpenter; Va. Battery, Capt. William T. Poague; Va. Battery, Capt. George W. Woodin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Cedar Mountain, Va.: August 9th, 1862. (search)
., Col. Edwin G. Lee. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 48 = 58. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Garnett: 21st Va., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham (k), Capt. W. A. Witcher; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane (m w), Capt. Abner Dobyns; 48th Va., Capt. William Y. C. Hannum; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Maj. John Seddon. Brigade loss: k, 91; w, 210 = 301. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro, Col. Alexander G. Taliaferro: 10th Va., Maj. Joshua Stover; 23d Va., Col. Alexander G. Taliaferro, Lieut.-Col. George W. Curtis (m w), Maj. Simon T. Walton; 37th Va., Col. T. V. Williams (w), Maj. H. C. Wood; 47th Ala., Lieut.-Col. James W. Jackson; 48th Ala., Col. James L. Sheffield (w), Lieut.-Col. Abner A. Hughes. Brigade loss: k, 51; w, 271 = 322. Fourth Brigade, Col. Leroy A. Stafford; 2d La.,-----; note.--In these tables the dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--Editors. 9th La.,-----; 10th La.,-----; 15th La.,-----Brigade loss: k, 4;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
d not then know how weakly the place had been defended by the officer to whom Beauregard had intrusted its defense. Though the main body of the army with which Curtis had defeated Van Dorn at Elkhorn was still dragging itself slowly over the mountains, or floundering through the swamps of Arkansas, it, too, sent reenforceents t in command of all the troops west of the Tennessee, including those at Columbus and Cairo; ordering him, however, to send Hovey's division to Helena to reenforce Curtis, and Thomas into middle Tennessee to rejoin Buell. As soon as Beauregard, whose health had been seriously impaired, was satisfied that Halleck did not intend t good fortune-Philip H. Sheridan. At the beginning of 1862 he was still but a captain of infantry, on duty as quartermaster and commissary of the army with which Curtis was marching against Price in Missouri. He had come to Corinth with Halleck, and was still doing duty there as quartermaster when, on the 25th of May, he was mad
The Tribune's overture the Albany evening Journal's the Philadelphis meeting Mayor Henry Judge Woodward George W. Curtis suppressed. in one of Beaumarchais's comedies, a green reveler in every advantage and luxury that noble birth and say or do, aught calculated to displease said slaveholders or offend the Slave Power, was promptly demonstrated. Mr. George W. Curtis, one of our most attractive and popular public speakers, had been engaged by the People's Literary Institute of Phnotification: Office of the Mayor of the city of Philadelphia, Dec. 10, 1860. dear Sir :--The appearance of George W. Curtis, Esq., as a lecturer before the People's Literary Institute, on Thursday evening next, will be extremely unwise. If foregoing: Concert Hall, December 11, 1860. dear Sir:--I have been officially informed that, in the event of G. W. Curtis lecturing in this Hall on Thursday evening next, a riot is anticipated. Under these circumstances, I cannot permit th
ce at all hazards of Slavery in Cuba, etc.--and that all anti-Slavery discussion or expostulation must be systematically suppressed, as sedition, if not treason — such was the gist of the Southern requirement. A long-haired, raving Abolitionist in the furthest North, according to conservative ideas, not merely disturbed the equilibrium of Southern society, but undermined the fabric of our National prosperity. He must be squelched, See Mayor Henry's speech; also his letter forbidding G. W. Curtis's lecture, pages 363-7. or there could be no further Union. Haman, surrounded by the power and pomp of his dazzling exaltation, bitterly says, All this availeth me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai, the Jew, sitting at the king's gate. Esther v., 13. Hence the South would accord no time, allow no canvass by Northern men of the Slave States in the hope of disabusing their people of the prejudice that we were their natural, implacable enemies. See Senator Clingman, page 373. Th
rews, T. A., of Phila., letter refusing the use of his hall to George W. Curtis, 367. Annapolis, Md., landing of Gen. Butler at, 469. Anm., of Ga., 91. Curtin, Gov. Andrew G., of Pa., elected, 326. Curtis, Geo.W., suppressed at Philadelphia, 367. Curtis, Judge B. R., 2Curtis, Judge B. R., 252; on Dred Scott, 260-3. Cushing, Caleb, 146; chosen President of the Charleston Convention, 309; resigns the chair, 318; President of the calls a Peace meeting, 362; his speech, 363; his prohibition of G. W. Curtis, 367; 406. Henry, Gustavus A., a Commissioner from Tennessee 216; Convention at in 1856, 247; Peace Meeting at, 362 to 366; Geo. W. Curtis at, 367; speech of President Lincoln, 419-20. Philadelphia Penton's views, 259; Webster's, 260; Judge McLean's opinion, 260; Judge Curtis's, 260 to 263; Buchanan's views, 264; 306 to 309; allusion to, 353 to 257; the decision identical with Calhoun's theories, 259 ; Judge Curtis's reply to, 261-2. Tappan, Arthur, 114; 116; 126. Tappan,
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, C. P. Cranch. (search)
ise, and without envy of those who were more fortunate. What is called odium artisticum was unknown to him. He was an unpretending, courteous American gentleman. His disposition was perfect, and no one could remember having seen him out of temper. His pleasant flow of wit and humor, together with his varied accomplishments, made him a very brilliant man in society, and he counted among his friends the finest literati in Rome, London, and the United States. He knew Thackeray as he knew Curtis and Lowell, and was once dining with him in a London chop-house, when Thackeray said: Have you read the last number of The Newcombs?-if not, I will read it to you. Accordingly he gave the waiter a shilling to obtain the document, and read it aloud to Cranch and a friend who was with him. Both mentioned in Hawthorne's Notebook. Cranch could never understand this, for it was the last thing he would have done himself without an invitation; but he enjoyed the reading, and often referred to
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
eems impossible to convince politicians that it is not visionary to be guided by correct principles in the administration of affairs. Their idea is, the greater the indirectness and the double dealing, the greater the statesmanship. Yet, all the time, they make loud professions of following the teaching of him who said, Let your yea be yea, and your nay, nay. Oh, Sarah, I am so tired of shams! It is very inconvenient to be habitually direct, in such a world of indirectness. I pitied Mr. Curtis when I read his patient answers to the interviewers. Really, those men, who have made a profession of audacity and impertinence, are as insufferable a nuisance as mosquitoes; and in these days there is no kind of netting that will keep the pests out. Certainly the prophesied day has arrived, when whatsoever is done in the house is proclaimed upon the house-top. Was Dr. Livingstone really interviewed by a Yankee interviewer? Why don't we hear further from him? What has become of the pa
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To John G. Whittier. (search)
To John G. Whittier. Wayland, June 18, 1874. I cannot help writing to thank you for the Lines you have written to the memory of Charles Sumner. They are very beautiful, and nothing could be more appropriate. We went into Boston to hear Mr. Curtis's Memorial Address. I had been longing, amid all the fuss and formality, to hear just the right thing said about Mr. Sumner, and Mr. Curtis said it, and said it eloquently, from the heart. . . . Corruption is so widespread and so rampant, thatMr. Curtis said it, and said it eloquently, from the heart. . . . Corruption is so widespread and so rampant, that I sometimes have gloomy forebodings concerning the future of this country; but the spontaneous and general homage to Charles Sumner's memory shows that there is still great respect for integrity deeply rooted in the popular mind. I was reading over several of your poems last week, and for the thousandth time I felt myself consoled and strengthened by them, as well as delighted with their poetic beauty. It was a very precious gift you received, dear friend, to be such a benefactor to the sou
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