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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 11 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 4 0 Browse Search
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ociety. Almost every one was so restless that he must needs be on the go all the time. Even the theatres were packed every night. The actors and actresses of that time were very fine. Forrest, Sothern, Joe Jefferson, Booth the elder, Charlotte Cushman, and other celebrated men and women were on the boards, Lord Dundreary furnishing recreation and amusement for the weary, Rip Van Winkle bringing tears from the sympathetic, while Charlotte Cushman's Queen Catherine and Meg Merrilies awakenCharlotte Cushman's Queen Catherine and Meg Merrilies awakened the wildest enthusiasm for her great power in the rendition of such roles. In February she came to Washington to play for five nights: the first night giving Queen Catherine, supported by J. B. Studley, a fine actor; the second night in Meg Merrilies. When she delivered the curse upon poor Bertram, her figure seemed to rise to the stature of a giantess before her trembling, cringing victim. On this occasion she was brought before the curtain again and again, the whole audience, from orche
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Garland's report of the battle of seven Pines. (search)
derson Solomon, Robert W. Vaughan, Richard Wilson, John B. Gold and James Belcher. Company K--Sergeants G. W. Morrison and C. C. Marshall; Privates John Burlington, E. H. Estes, R. J. Hatcher and John R. Billings; Corporal R. C. Fortune (killed). (The officers commanding Companies A, B, E and F are now absent, wounded; they may have names to present hereafter.) Second Florida. Company A--Sergeant Riley (distinguished both at Seven Pines and at Williamsburg); Corporal Rasson; Musician Cushman; Privates Bradley, Bryant, Hooper, Kennedy and Reed (special case). Company B--Lieutenants Jenkins and Thompson; Privates Finley, Crosby, Colson, Tidwell, Parker and Malphus; Sergeant Williams, Color-Bearer. Company C--Corporal J. B. Cason; Privates Gathegan, Wilkinson, Cone and Miller. Company D--Lieutenant Parker (who captured the colors of the Eighth New York); Sergeant Stephens; Privates Rawls, Morrison and Waller. Company E--Captain McCaslin; Lieutenant Reynolds (dead)
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
General B. T. Johnston's article on The civil rights bill and the enforcement act is a very able and timely discussion of the questions involved, and a very strong putting of certain fundamental principles of our Government which seem to have grown obsolete in these days of Reconstruction (so-called). The other articles--Commercial future of the United States, by W. P. H.; Birds in Song and the Songs of Birds, by Miss K. M. Rowland; Dr. William E. Munsey, by Rev. E. E. Hoss; Charlotte Cushman, by Mrs. James Gittings, and Gold interests of Virginia and the South, by John Tyler-seem all to be cleverly done, while Table talk and Book Notices, by the editor, clearly indicate that these departments of the Review will be fresh, sprightly and readable. On the whole, we cordially commend the Review as worthy of a wide circulation. The annals of the war. By Principal Participants North and South. We are indebted to the publishers (Philadelphia Weekly Times) for a copy of th
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Leaves from a Roman diary: February, 1869 (Rewritten in 1897) (search)
another whispered a name in my ear which I did not suppose was known in Europe. I have not yet discovered who they were. Feb. 19, 1869. I have had the pleasure of dining with that remarkable woman and once distinguished actress, Miss Charlotte Cushman. Her nephew was consul at Rome, appointed by William H. Seward, who was one of her warmest American friends. She is still queen of the stage, and of her own household, and unconsciously gives orders to the servants in a dramatic manner sed it, for it did not seem to her a satisfactory copy; a conclusion that I had been slowly coming to myself. She has a bronze replica of Story's Beethoven which, like most of his statues, is seated in a chair, and a rather realistic work, as Miss Cushman admitted. I judged from the conversation at table that she is not treated with full respect by the English and American society here, although looked upon as a distinguished person. The reason for this may be more owing to the social positi
ist; he died in 1832. Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the philosopher, the statesman, the patriot, who by his wisdom blessed his country, and his age, and bequeat
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
of which some forty are available for examination. First in point of time come the Indian dramas, of which the most important are Stone's Metamora, Bird's Oralloossa, and the series of plays dealing with the Pocahontas theme. The best of these are The Indian Princess by Barker (1808), Pocahontas or the settlers of Virginia by George Washington Custis, first played in Philadelphia, 16 January, 1830, Pocahontas, by Robert Dale Owen, acted first 8 February, 1838, in New York, with-Charlotte Cushman as Rolfe, and The forest Princess, by Charlotte Barnes Conner, acted in Philadelphia, 16 February, 1848. They all emphasize the love story of Rolfe and Pocahontas and make John Smith a central character. Mrs. Conner alone takes Pocahontas to England, where she dies. Of the colonial dramas, Barker's Superstition (1824) and R. P. Smith's William Penn (1829) seem the most significant. As was natural, the Revolution was the most appealing theme. Practically every great event from the Bos
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 148 Crabbe, George, 279 Crafts, William, 237 Cranch, Christopher P., 333, 341 Crater, the, 302 Crayon sketches, 241 Crevecoeur, St. Jean de, 184, 189, 190, 191, 198-201, 211, 212 Crisis, the, 144, 145 Criterion, the, 244 Critique of practical reason, 334 Critique of pure reason, 334 Croaker and Co., 281 Crockett, David, 319 Cromwell,--4, 5, 41 Cruse, Peter Hoffman, 311 Culprit Fay, 281 Curiosa Americana, 55 Curtis, G. W., 345 Curwen, Alice, 8 Cushman, Charlotte, 225 Custis, George Washington, 221, 225 D D'Alembert, 91 Daly, Augustin, 229 Daly, Charles P., 216 n. Damsel of Darien, 317 Dana, Richard Henry, 240, 262, 269, 269 n., 276, 278, 321, 345 Danse Canadienne, 188 Dante, 174, 264 Darby, William, 189 Davenant, 157 Davenport, E. L., 223, 224 Davis, John, 202, 234, 291 Day of doom, the, 156, 157 Days (Emerson), 359 Deane, Charles, 20 Death (Porteus), 263, 263 n. Death of Schiller, the, 270 n
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VII: the free church (search)
Worcester there came from time to time people whom it was a delight to meet. Last week, wrote Mr. Higginson, Mr. Emerson was here and gave one of his old style of lectures, rich and delicious, he staid here, and I never liked him so much; he had all his invariable gentleness and graciousness. At another time he writes, To-day I have had a tolerably good time. Tea with Alice and Phoebe Cary, the latter a dumpy jolly milkmaid, the former rather fine and superior. Of the actress, Charlotte Cushman, whom Mr. Higginson introduced to a Worcester audience by reading a letter describing her, he wrote to Harriet Prescott:— What a wonder she is! That magnificent vigor and vital heat of hers is enough to redeem her native land forever from the charge of producing sickly and lifeless women. . . . I was careful what I read, but there was one little sentence which described her so perfectly, I read on, but first I asked Miss ——, Will she blush? and the good great creature broke in <
es for, 326, 327; at Besant trial, 329, 330; parish of, gives present to Higginson, 346, 347; Convention, 336, 337. Crane, Walter, 340. Crawford, Marion, and Higginson, 354, 355. Crothers, Rev. Samuel M., officiates at Colonel Higginson's funeral, 399-401. Cummings, Rev., Edward, 366. Curson, Mrs., the Higginsons live with, 105, 106. Curtin, Gov., and Higginson's plan, 204, 205. Curtis, Daniel, and Higginson, 42, 43. Curtis, George William, and anti-slavery, 142. Cushman, Charlotte, described, 130, 131. Dall, Mrs. C. H., 141; on Mademoiselle and her Campaigns, 157. Dame, Mrs., a Quaker, 255, 258. Dana, Richard H., about Higginson, 320. Darwin, Charles, account of, 324; visit to, 334. Decoration Day, a poem, 273, 340. Descendants of the Reverend Francis Higginson, 396, 398, 428. Devens, Charles, appeal to, 111, 112. Dickens, Charles, 339; reaction against, 336. Dickens, Child Pictures from, 277, 410. Dickinson, Emily, Higginson's acqu
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet G. Hosmer. (search)
ng from our poor nature, and allow no paradise on earth,--the envy, jealousy, bitter criticism, and aspersion of partakers and competitors in the same pursuits and the same glories. About this time Miss Hosmer formed acquaintance with Miss Charlotte Cushman, who recognized her ability, and kin. died her desire to study at Rome to a flame. It was arranged that her father, whose affection and devotion to his daughter seemed to equal her energy and enthusiasm, should accompany her there, and lr money liberally, and with English residents entered warmly into the sport. Miss Hosmer, it is related, rode with astonishing ease and fearlessness. None of the English officers excelled her in leaping ditches and fences. With her friend, Miss Cushman, she often led the chase, returning with quite as just claims for the fox as gentlemen could present. By the rules of the hunt the tail of the fox, called the brush, is given to the best and boldest rider as a trophy; but the Italians, having
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