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The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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nel Stone, of the Second Mississippi, Lieutenant-Colonel McLemore, Fourth Alabama, and Major Webb, Sixth North Carolina, commanding regiments, handled their men with consummate ability. The officers of my personal staff, Lieutenants Terrell and Cussons, rendered the most valuable service, discharging every duty faithfully and gallantly. Lieutenant Cussons was captured by the enemy while on a reconnoissance in front of the lines. Privates Smith, Fourth Alabama, and Sharpe, Hampton legion, actLieutenant Cussons was captured by the enemy while on a reconnoissance in front of the lines. Privates Smith, Fourth Alabama, and Sharpe, Hampton legion, acting as officers, also contributed valuable assistance. The following is a recapitulation of the loss in the several regiments composing the brigade, as shown by the accompanying lists of casualties:  Killed.Wounded. Fourth Alabama,1944 Eleventh Mississippi,969 Sixth North Carolina,664 Second Mississippi,2287    56264 I am, Captain, very respectfully, E. M. Law, Colonel, commanding Third Brigade. Report of Colonel E. M. Law of battle of Sharpsburg. headquarters, Third b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ebels and traitors, would he be extremely proud of that fact? Would he be proud to be the nephew of Benedict Arnold? No; and no man at the North who knows anything of the foundation of this government believes for a moment that any Confederate soldier was a rebel or traitor, or that the war on our part was a Rebellion. Even Goldwin Smith, the harshest and most unjust historian to the South, who has ever written about the war (as demonstrated by our distinguished Past Grand Commander, Captain Cussons), says: The Southern leaders ought not to have been treated as rebels, for, says he, Secession was not rebellion. And so, we say, the time has come when these intended opprobrious epithets should cease to be used. But whether called rebel or not, the Confederate soldier has nothing to be ashamed of. Can the soldiers of the Federal armies read this record and say the same? Yes, our comrades, let them call us rebels, if they will; we are proud of the title, and with good reas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
ebels and traitors, would he be extremely proud of that fact? Would he be proud to be the nephew of Benedict Arnold? No; and no man at the North who knows anything of the foundation of this government believes for a moment that any Confederate soldier was a rebel or traitor, or that the war on our part was a Rebellion. Even Goldwin Smith, the harshest and most unjust historian to the South, who has ever written about the war (as demonstrated by our distinguished Past Grand Commander, Captain Cussons), says: The Southern leaders ought not to have been treated as rebels, for, says he, Secession was not rebellion. And so, we say, the time has come when these intended opprobrious epithets should cease to be used. But whether called rebel or not, the Confederate soldier has nothing to be ashamed of. Can the soldiers of the Federal armies read this record and say the same? Yes, our comrades, let them call us rebels, if they will; we are proud of the title, and with good reas
The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1862., [Electronic resource], Daring adventure-shooting on the Peninsula. (search)
, of an adventure of two soldiers on the Peninsula, one of whom (Mr. Cussons) was formerly an editor of that paper: I may here mention and numbers of the enemy's force then landing near West Point, private Cussons and Sergeant Hartley, of our regiment, readily volunteered forur, who appeared to be in command, ordered the scouts to advance. Cussons replied by a demand to surrender. There was another pause; then at fire poor Hartley fell dead, and two of the enemy bit the dust. Cussons reloaded, and stepped behind a tree. While capping his gun at tha the next picket post, attracted by the firing, advanced at a run. Cussons waited until they were within about fifteen paces, and then shot ded without firing. By this time the entire picket was arouse, and Cussons drew off some sixty or seventy yards into the woods, when he lay de the sad but gallant end of this you and accomplished soldier. Cussons several times within the enemy's lines that night, and from the