hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 20 results in 8 document sections:

John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Roslyn and the White house: before and after. (search)
e in which a species of barbaric and disgusting splendour seemed to culminate. Strange moment for my first visit to the White House! to a spot which I had seen often in fancy, but never before with the mortal eye. For this place was one of those historic localities where the forms and voices of the mighty men of old appeared still to linger. Here young Colonel Washington, after that bloody march of Braddock, had paused on his journey to Williamsburg to accept the hospitalities of John Parke Custis. Here he had spent hour after hour conversing with the fair young widow who was to become Mrs. Washington, while his astonished body-servant held the bridle for him to mount; here he had been married; here were spent many happy days of a great life — a century at least before the spot saluted my gaze! In this old locality some of the noblest and fairest forms that eye ever beheld had lived their lives in the dead years. Here gay voices had echoed, bright eyes had shone; here a s
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
father-in-law, Mr. Custis, recalled him to Arlington in the fall of that year; but he returned as soon as possible to his regimental headquarters in Texas. The death of the adopted son of Washington, October 10, 1857, in his seventy-sixth year, was greatly deplored. His unbounded hospitality was as broad as his acres, and his vivid recollections of the Father of his Country, though only eighteen when he died, and whose memory he venerated, were most charmingly narrated. His father, John Parke Custis, the son of Mrs. Washington by her first husband, was Washington's aid-de-camp at the siege of Yorktown, and died at the early age of twenty-eight. G. W. P. Custis, the grandson of Mrs. Washington, was educated at Princeton. His early life was passed at Mount Vernon, but after the death of his grandmother, in 1802, he built Arlington House, opposite the city of Washington, on an estate left him by his father. In his will he decreed that all of his slaves should be set free after
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
ceeds Hooker, 254. Cox, General Jacob D., 116. Crampton's Gap, 205, 206. Crecy, the battle of, 420. Creole, a favorite horse, 34. Cromwell, Oliver, 34, 56. Crook, General, mentioned, 340, 350, 373- Culpeper Court House, 140, 179, 220. Culp's Hill, 274, 277, 284, 299. Cumberland Sound, Ga., 14, 15. Cushing, Lieutenant A. H., at Gettysburg, 296. Custer's cavalry division, 373. Custis, George Washington Parke, mentioned, 25, 65, 84; death of, 71; his will, 237. Custis, John Parke, 71. Custis, Mrs. G. W. P., death of, 51. Custis, Mary A. R., 25, 26. Dahlgren, Colonel, Ulric, death of, 324. Davis, Colonel B. F., mentioned, 203. Davis, Jefferson, mentioned, 52, 53, 54, 62, 95, 96, 108, 134, 149, 260; letter to Lee, 310; his cabinet, 324; mentioned, 369; at church, 379, 384; indicted, 400; comments on Lee, 418. Dearing, General, killed, 384. Deep Bottom, on the James, 350. D'Erlon's First Corps, 421, 422. Devil's Den, Gettysburg, 274, 285.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custis, George Washington Parke 1781- (search)
Custis, George Washington Parke 1781- adopted son of George Washington; born in Mount Airy, Md., April 30, 1781; was a grandson of Mrs. Washington. His father was John Parke Custis, and his mother was Eleanor Calvert, of Maryland. At the siege of Yorktown his father was aide-de-camp to Washington; was seized with camp-fever; retired to Eltham, and there died before Washington (who hastened thither immediately after the surrender) could reach his bedside. Washington afterwards adopted his two children—Eleanor Parke and George Washington Parke Custis—as his own. Their early home was at Mount Vernon. George was educated partly at Princeton, and was eighteen years of age at the time of Washington's death, who made him an executor of his will and left him a handsome estate, on which he lived, until his death, Oct. 10, 1857, in literary, artistic, and agricultural pursuits. In his early days Mr. Custis was an eloquent speaker; and in his later years he produced a series of histo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
esident of the council, acting governor.] Francis' Fauquier, appointed governor, arrives......June 7, 1758 Gen. John Forbes's expedition against Fort Duquesne......July, 1758 Washington commands a regiment, and from it garrisons Fort Pitt, then considered within the jurisdiction of Virginia. He marches back to Winchester and takes his seat in the Assembly, resigning his commission after more than five years continuous service......December, 1758 He marries Martha, widow of John Parke Custis......Jan. 6, 1759 Patrick Henry's speech in the Parsons' case ......Dec. 1, 1763 Stamp Act approved by the King......March 22, 1765 Patrick Henry introduces in the Virginia Assembly five resolutions against the Stamp Act......May 30, 1765 Virginia prevented by Governor Fauquier from sending delegates to the congress in New York to oppose the Stamp Act......October, 1765 George Mercer appointed distributer of stamps, but not permitted to serve......October, 1765 Repeal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Martha 1732-1781 (search)
after the war she received with grace and dignity, as the head of the household of the great patriot, the numerous distinguished guests who thronged to Mount Vernon. One of her two children died just as she was blossoming into womanhood; the other, a son, was aide-de-camp to Washington during the war. He died in October, 1781, leaving two children—a son and a daughter—whom Washington adopted as his own. On Dec. 11, 1775, Mrs. Washington arrived at Cambridge, accompanied by her son, John Parke Custis, and his wife. She was very hospitably received and welcomed by the most distinguished families in Massachusetts. The army hailed her presence on this, as on all other occasions, with enthusiasm. She was urged to make the visit and spend some time at headquarters by two motives—one, affection for her husband; and another, because of apprehensions of danger at Mount Vernon on account of the operations of Lord Dunmore. She remained in Cambridge Shadow portrait of Martha Washington.<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washingtoniana. -1857 (search)
Ohio country, this chief travelled many miles to see the man who he and his followers, who tried to shoot him, were satisfied was under the protection of the Great Spirit. He said he had a dozen fair shots at him, but could not hit him. John Parke Custis, an only son of Mrs. Washington, by a former husband, was aide to the commander-in-chief at Yorktown, at the beginning of the siege. Seized with camp-fever, he retired to Eltham, the seat of Colonel Bassett, a kinsman, where he died. At ts evacuated, General Washington's servant was left behind sick; that in his possession was a small portmanteau belonging to the general, in which, among other things of trifling value, were the drafts of letters to Mrs. Washington, her son (John Parke Custis), and his manager at Mount Vernon, Lund Washington, and that these had been transmitted to England by an officer into whose hands they had fallen. This fiction was contrived to deceive the public into a belief of their genuineness. It is
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weeping-willow, the (search)
me to Boston with the British army brought a twig from Pope's then huge willow, expecting, when the rebellion should be crushed, in a few weeks, to settle in America on some confiscated lands of the rebels, where he would plant his willow. John Parke Custis, son of Mrs. Washington, and aide to General Washington, at Cambridge, going on errands to the British camp, under a flag of truce, became acquainted with the owner of the willow twig (which was wrapped in oiled Pohick Church. silk). Thscated lands of the rebels, where he would plant his willow. John Parke Custis, son of Mrs. Washington, and aide to General Washington, at Cambridge, going on errands to the British camp, under a flag of truce, became acquainted with the owner of the willow twig (which was wrapped in oiled Pohick Church. silk). The disappointed subaltern gave the twig to Custis, who planted it near his home on his estate at Abingdon, Va., where it became the progenitor of all the weeping-willows in America.