hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 12 results in 5 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
drawing-room in the evening, and happy in his work on the parapet next day. He was in love from boyhood. Fate brought him to the feet of one who, by birth, education, position, and family tradition, was best suited to be his life companion. Mary Custis, the daughter of George Washington Parke Custis, of Arlington, and Robert E. Lee, were married on the 30th of June, 1831, only two years after he had emerged from his Alma Mater. They had known each other when she was a child at Arlington anington and the grandson of Mrs. Washington. Lee was therefore to marry a great granddaughter of Mrs. Washington, and was a fortunate man, not so much, perhaps, from these ties, but because of the great qualities of head and heart possessed by Mary Custis, his affianced bride. It is difficult to say whether she was more lovely on that memorable June evening when the Rev. Mr. Keith asked her, Wilt thou have this man to be thy wedded husband? or after many years had passed, and she was seated i
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
6-27, 273-74. Kershaw, Joseph Brevard, 270, 273-78, 280-83, 286-87, 294, 299-300, 339 Killing of prisoners, 80-81. Kilpatrick, Hugh Judson, 237 King William Artillery (Va.), 91 Kingsley, Charles, 92 Lane, James Henry, 134 Latimer's Artillery Battalion, 217-18. Latrobe, Osmun, 272 Law, Evander McIvor, 276, 286 Lawton, Alexander Robert, 135, 158 Lee, Fitzhugh, 18, 164, 178, 263 Lee, George Washington Custis: described, 312; mentioned, 238-39, 316-17, 332-34. Lee, Mary Custis (Mrs. Robert E.), 238-39, 357 Lee, Robert Edward: attitude of his men toward, 18-23, 72, 169-70, 189, 205, 226, 259-60, 266, 305-306, 325; and Chancellorsville Campaign, 164- 66, 168-69, 174-81, 238; comments on Meade, 227-28; compared with divine figures, 20-21; criticized, 22, 228; description of and anecdotes concerning, 99-101, 175-78, 225-28, 232-33, 259-60, 267, 357, 361; early war career of, 17-18; and Gettysburg, 22, 191-92, 197-99, 207-208, 214-15, 222, 267; and Grant, 238- 3
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
nal military academy in 1825, and was graduated in 1829, without a demerit and with second honors. During these youthful years he was remarkable in personal appearance, possessing a handsome face and superb figure, and a manner that charmed by cordiality and won respect by dignity. He was thoroughly moral, free from the vices, and while fall of life and fun, animated, bright and charming, as a contemporary describes him, he was more inclined to serious than to gay society. He married Mary Custis, daughter of Washington Parke Custis, and grand-daughter of Martha Washington, at Arlington, Va., June 30, 1831. Their children were G. W. Custis, Mary, W. H. Fitzhugh, Annie, Agnes, Robert and Mildred. At his graduation he was appointed second-lieutenant of engineers and by assignment engaged in engineering at Old Point and on the coasts. In 1834 he was assistant to the chief engineer at Washington; in 1835 on the commission to mark the boundary line between Ohio and Michigan; in 18
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ty for the Government he served, and with a patriot's faith and hope in the institutions of his country. His ancestors had been among the most distinguished and revered of its founders; his own life from youth upward had been spent and his blood shed in its service, and two of his sons, following his footsteps, held commissions in the army. He was born in the same county, and descended from the same strains of English blood from which Washington sprang, and was united in marriage with Mary Custis, the daughter of his adopted son. He had been reared in the school of simple manners and lofty thoughts which belonged to the elder generation; and with Washington as his exemplar of manhood and his ideal of wisdom, he reverenced his character and fame and work with a feeling as near akin to worship as any that man can have for aught that is human. Unlike the statesmen of the hostile sections, who were constantly thrown into the provoking conflicts of political debate, he had been with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Long's memoir of General R. E. Lee. (search)
and W. H. Taylor, of Lee's staff, and others of our ablest soldiers) so absorbed in active business that we should have lost these invaluable Recollections of Lee, as a gallant and accomplished soldier saw him. The genealogy of the Lee family, and the account of the early youth and opening manhood of Lee, are very interesting, and contain some new matter in the reminiscences of cotemporaries of the boy, the cadet, the skillful young engineer officer, and the account of his marriage to Mary Custis, and home life at Arlington. The sketch of the career of Captain Lee in the Mexican war, is the fullest and most valuable which has yet been published, and is rendered the more interesting by contributions of General Wilcox, General Hunt, and General J. E. Johnston, besides free quotations from the official reports, which show that even then he was the rising soldier of the army. The life of Lee from the Mexican war to the breaking out of the great war between the States—his service