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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
eral Constitution! Guns are being fired on Capitol Hill in commemoration of secession, and the Confederate flag now floats unmolested from the summit of the capitol. I think they had better save the powder, etc. At night. We have a gay illumination. This too is wrong. We had better save the candles. April 21 Received several letters to-day which had been delayed in their transmission, and were doubtless opened on the way. One was from my wife, informing me of the illness of Custis, my eldest son, and of the equivocal conduct of some of the neighbors. The Rev. Mr. D., son of the late B — p, raised the flag of the Union on his church. The telegraphic wires are still in operation. April 22 Early a few mornings since, I called on Gov. Wise, and informed him that Lincoln had called out 70,000 men. He opened his eyes very widely and said, emphatically, I don't believe it. The greatest statesmen of the South have no conception of the real purposes of the men no
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 3 (search)
ed the ravages of the enemy, although the people were as loyal to the government of the United States as any; but the Yankees are more enterprising than the British, and may have an eye to truck farms in that fruitful region. May 4 Met Wm. H. B. Custis, Esq., to-day in the square, and had a long conversation with him. He has made up his mind to sign the ordinance. He thinks secession might have been averted with honor, if our politicians at Washington had not been ambitious to figure as leaders in a new revolution. Custis was always a Democrat, and supported Douglas on the ground that he was the regular nominee. He said his negro property a month before was worth, perhaps, fifty thousand dollars; now his slaves would not bring probably more than five thousand; and that would be the fate of many slaveowners in Virginia. May 5 President Tyler has placed in my hands a memorial to President Davis, signed by himself and many of the members of the Convention, asking appropriat
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, III. June, 1861 (search)
enith like the quick-shooting irradiations of the aurora borealis. And men ran in different directions, uttering cries of agony. These cries, I remember distinctly, came from men. As I gazed upon the fading and dissolving moon, I thought of the war brought upon us, and the end of the United States Government. My family were near, all of them, and none seemed alarmed or distressed. I experienced no perturbation; but I awoke. I felt curious to prolong the vision, but sleep had fled. I was gratified, however, to be conscious of the fact that in this illusory view of the end of all things sublunary, I endured no pangs of remorse or misgivings of the new existence it seemed we were about to enter upon. June 29 I cannot support my family here, on the salary I receive from the government; and so they leave me in a few days to accept the tendered hospitality of Dr. Custis, of Newbern, N. C., my wife's cousin. June 30 My family engaged packing trunks. They leave immediately.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
V. August, 1861 My son Custis appointed clerk in the War Department. N. Y. Herald contains a pretty correct army list of the C. S. appearance of Plug Uglies. President's rupture with Beauregard. President sick. alien enemies ordered away. brief interview with the President. immediate. large numbers of cava a terrible one before they can be convinced that a reduction of the rebellion is not a practicable thing. August 4 To-day Mr. Walker inquired where my son Custis was. I told him he was with his mother at Newbern, N. C. He authorized me to telegraph him to return, and he should be appointed to a clerkship. August 5 CoS. Army Regulations to the service of the Confederate States. It is only to strike out U. S. and insert C. S., and yet the colonel groans over it. August 6 Custis arrived and entered upon the discharge of his duties. August 7 Saw Col. Pendleton to-day, but it was not the first time. I have seen him in the pulpit, and
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
Ix. December, 1861 Gen. Lee ordered South. Gen. Stuart ambuscaded at Drainsville. W. H. B. Custis returns to the Eastern Shore. Winder's detectives. Kentucky secedes. Judge Perkins's resolution. Dibble goes North. waiting for great Britain to do something. Mr. Ely, the Yankee M. C. December 1 The people here begin to murmur at the idea that they are questioned about their loyalty, and often arrested, by Baltimore petty larceny detectives, who, if they were patriotic ths home were paid by the government; and officers of unimpeachable veracity are ready to testify that Gen. Stuart was misled by these very men. December 7 Quite a commotion has been experienced in official circles by the departure of Mr. W. H. B. Custis, late Union member of the Virginia Convention, without obtaining a passport to leave the city. Some of his secession constituents being in the city, reported that they knew it was his purpose to return to the Eastern Shore of Virginia, an
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 15 (search)
Yankees on the Peninsula mean to fight. Well, that is what our brave army pants for.. May 5 The prospect of battle produces a joyous smile on every soldier's face to-day. May 6-7 We have not yet reached the lowest round of the ladder. The Secretary is at Norfolk, and the place is to be evacuated. I would resign first. May 8 Norfolk and Portsmouth are evacuated! Our army falling back! The Merrimac is to be, or has been, blown up! May 9 My family, excepting my son Custis, started to-day for Raleigh, N. C., where our youngest daughter is at school. But it is in reality another flight from the enemy. No one, scarcely, supposes that Richmond will be defended. But it must be! May 10 The President's family have departed for Raleigh, and the families of most of the cabinet to their respective homes, or other places of refuge. The President has been baptized (at home) and privately confirmed in St. Paul's Church. May 11 The Baltimore detectives are
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 16 (search)
been brought back since the assumption of command by Gen. Lee. Col. Bledsoe denounced the organization as a humbug! Defending the government, or readiness to defend it, in such times as these, is no humbug! In the fluctuations of a great battle, almost in the suburbs of the city, a squadron of the enemy's horse might penetrate even to the office of the Chief Executive, when a few hundred muskets, in the hands of old men and boys, might preserve the papers. After dinner I repaired, with Custis and a few friends, to my old stand on the hill north of the Jews' Cemetery, and sat down in the shade to listen. Many persons were there as usual-for every day some firing could be heard — who said, in response to my inquiries, that distant guns had been heard in the direction of the Pamunky River. That is Jackson! I exclaimed, as the sounds were distinctly discerned by myself; and he is in their rear, behind their right wing! All were incredulous, and some doubted whether he was
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
as we have taken at least 40,000 more of the enemy's men than they have captured of ours. Yesterday, Congress, which has prolonged the session until the 13th instant, passed a bill increasing the pay of soldiers four dollars per month. I hope they will increase our pay before they adjourn. Congress also, yesterday, voted down the proposition of a forced loan of one-fifth of all incomes. But the Committee of Ways and Means are instructed to bring forward another bill. This evening Custis and I expect the arrival of my family from Raleigh, N. C. We have procured for them one pound of sugar, 80 cents; one quart of milk, 25 cents; one pound of sausagemeat, 37 1/2 cents; four loaves of bread, as large as my fist, 20 cents each; and we have a little coffee, which is selling at $2.50 per pound. In the morning, some one must go to market, else there will be short-commons. Washing is $2.50 per dozen pieces. Common soap is worth 75 cents per pound. October 8 At last we have
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
en Mr. Myers and Mr. Randolph, that the former had already succeeded, when the latter was Secretary of War, in getting the substitutes of the Jew extortioners out of the army, on the ground that they were not domiciled in this country; and now both are intent on procuring the exemption of the principals. This may be good practice, but it is not good service. Every man protected and enriched by the government, owes service to the country in its hour of peril. I am glad to hear that W. H. B. Custis, of the Eastern Shore of Virginia, takes no part in the war. This is the proper course for him under the circumstances. It is said he declined a high position tendered by the Federal Government. No doubt he has been much misrepresented: his principles are founded on the Constitution, which is violated daily at Washington, and therefore he can have no sympathy with that government. December 22 We shall never arrive at the correct amount of casualties at the battle of Fredericksbu
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
annock, over which he is now retreating. Many prisoners were taken, and the enemy's loss, in killed and wounded, large. We have again to thank Almighty God for a great victory. I regret to state that Gen. Paxton was killed. Gen. Jackson severely, and Generals Heth and A. P. Hill slightly, wounded. (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. Enough is known to raise the spirits of all. Gen. Lee gives thanks to God for a great victory; and he never misleads, never exaggerates. My son Custis got a musket and marched in one of the companies — I have not learned which — for the defense of the city. It is a sultry day, and he will suffer. The President was driven out in a light open carriage after the reception of Gen. Lee's dispatch, and exhibited the finest spirits. He was even diverted at the zeal of the old men and boys marching out with heavy muskets to the batteries. Brig.-Gen. Pryor, who has been under arrest (I know not for what offense), volunteered in a company
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