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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 197 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 31 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 31 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 11 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
m S. Harney. (Note.-E. V. Sumner was promoted Brigadier-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary: Gustavus V. Fox. Yards and Docks: Rear-Admiral Joseph Smith. Ordnance and Hydrography Captain George A. Magruder (dismissed April 22, 1861) Captain Andrew A. Harwood (relieved July 22, 1862) Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren (relieved June 24, 1863) Commander Henry A. Wise. (By act of Congress of July 5, 1862, Hydrography was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation.) Navigation (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Charles A. Davis. Equipment and recruiting (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Andrew H. Foote (relieved June 3, 1863) Commander Albert N. Smith. Construction, equipment, and repair. Chief Naval Constructor John Lenthall. (By act of Ju
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
10-inch mortars), Captain William Butler, Lieutenant J. A. Huguenin; Fort Moultrie (30 guns), Captain W. R. Calhoun: consisting of Channel Battery, Lieutenants Thomas M. Wagner, Preston, and Sitgreaves, Sumter Battery, Lieutenants Alfred Rhett and John Mitchell, and Oblique Battery, Lieutenant C. W. Parker; Mortar Battery No. 1 (2 10-inch mortars) and Enfilade Battery (4 guns), Captain James H. Hallonquist, Lieutenants Flemming, Jacob Valentine, and B. S. Burnet; the Point Battery (1 9-inch Dahlgren) and the Floating Iron-clad Battery (2 42-pounders and 2 32-pounders), Captain John R. Hamilton and Lieutenant Joseph A. Yates; the Mount Pleasant Battery (2 10-inchmortars),Captain Robert Martin, Lieutenant George N. Reynolds. Morris Island, Brigadier-General James Simons commanding, Lieutenant-Colonel Wilmot G. De Saussure, commanding the artillery: Major P. F. Stevens, commanding Cumming's Point Battery (Blakely gun, which arrived from Liverpool April 9th, Captain J. P. Thomas; 2 42-
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
entreville. That is to say, McDowell crossed Bull Run with 896 officers, 17,676 rank and file, and 24 pieces of artillery. The artillerymen who crossed Bull Run are embraced in the figures of the foregoing table. The guns were as follows: Ricketts's Battery, 6 10-pounder rifle guns; Griffin's Battery, 4 10-pounder rifle guns, 2 12-pounder howitzers; Arnold's Battery, 2 13-pounder rifle guns, 2 6-pounder smooth-bores; R. I. Battery, 6 13-pounder rifles; 71st N. Y. Reg't's Battery, 2 Dahlgren howitzers. The artillery, in addition to that which crossed Bull Run, was as follows: Hunt's Battery, 4 12-pounder rifle guns; Carlisle's Battery, 2 13-pounder rifle guns, 2 6-pounder smooth-bore guns; Tidball's Battery, 2 6-pounder smooth-bore guns, 2 12-pounder howitzers; Greene's Battery, 4 10-pounder rifle guns; Ayres's Battery, 2 10-pounder rifle guns, 2 6-pounder smooth-bore guns, 2 12-pounder howitzers; Edwards's Battery, 2 20-pounder rifle guns, 1 30-pounder rifle gun. Compo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
ured in her first and only engagement, when she attacked single-handed the whole Federal squadron. At Savannah, the Atlanta, a converted blockade-runner with a casemate covered with four inches of armor, was disabled and defeated by four shots from the monitor Weehawken. At Charleston, four casemate ironclads were built, the Palmetto State and Chicora in 1862, the Charleston in 1863, and the Columbia; the last, however, was still unfinished at the close of the war, and was captured by Admiral Dahlgren at the evacuation of the city. The other three were blown up at the same time. In the sounds of North Carolina two iron-clads were projected, one to be built on the Neuse River, the other on the Roanoke. The first was destroyed before completion, but the second, the Albemarle, which the Union forces, through most culpable negligence, suffered to remain undisturbed until she was fully armed and equipped, captured the town of Plymouth, and fought a drawn battle with the squadron of dou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
nnoyed and damaged us excessively, particularly as we had no gun on either flank of the bastion to reply with, for the 32-pounder on the right flank was shattered very early by a round shot, and on the north flank for want of a carriage no gun had been mounted. After the fourth fire the 10-inch Columbiad bounded over the limber and became useless. The 24-pounder rifled cannon was choked while ramming down a shell, and lay idle during nearly the whole engagement. The shells for the 9-inch Dahlgren were also too large. The fourth shell attempted to be rammed home could not be driven below the trunnions, and was then at great risk discharged. Thus far the fire of the enemy had been endured and replied to with the unruffled courage of veterans. At 10:30 our gunners became so fatigued that I left the fort, accompanied by one of my volunteer aides, Captain H. Rose, and went back to Captain Read's battery (one and three-quarter miles to the rear of the fort) and brought the greater part
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
d to know why the soldiers of the tenth legion were attached to Caesar. Arriving at Port Royal, Admiral Du Pont hurried forward the repairs of the monitors with the view of sending them to the Gulf, as directed by the Secretary of the Navy. On the 16th, however, came orders to renew the menace against Charleston, but his monitors were not repaired, nor could the Ironsides cross the bar until the next spring-tides. Meanwhile, the dispatches reciting the details of the battle Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren. From a photograph. of the 7th of April had, on their way north, crossed the orders from the Government, and after they were received with their development of weakness in the attacking force, the obstructions in the channel, and the strength of the defenses to be overcome, the order for continuing to menace Charleston was not reiterated, nor was the proposal of the admiral to make the next demonstration from Edisto, instead of Morris Island, rejected, approved, or made the subj
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
r operations against Charleston; but he was not permitted to enter upon this new field of labor, his sudden and untimely death leaving the command with Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren. [See p. 46.] Charleston was located in the Military Department of the South, comprising the narrow strip of sea-coast held by the Union forces in river had to be passed in full view under fire. All our Folly Island batteries opened before sunrise, and soon after this four iron-clad monitors, led by Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, steamed up abreast of Morris Island and took part in the action. After the cannonade had lasted nearly two hours General Strong was signaled to push forwrown 5009 projectiles, of which about one-half had struck the fort. Colonel Alfred Rhett, C. S. A., commanding Fort Sumter, reports, August 24th, One 11-inch Dahlgren, east face, the only gun serviceable ; and on September 1st, We have not a gun en barbette that can be fired; only one gun and casemate. General Stephen Ellio
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
ng in a condition to be easily repaired. He was blamed by the inexpert and zealous for not longer continuing the fight, or renewing it the next day, but subsequent events vindicated the soundness of his judgment. His withdrawal gave the Confederates great joy, and the happy issue, Beauregard said in a general order, inspired confidence in the country that the ultimate success of the Confederates would be complete. All the trophies of victory secured by the Confederates were two 11-inch Dahlgren guns, two United States flags, two pennants, and three signal flags. The guns were immediately put into the Confederate service--substantial trophies of the affair, Beauregard said. Had a sufficient supporting land force been employed in vigorously attacking the Confederates on Morris Island, and keeping the garrisons of Battery Gregg and Fort Wagner engaged while the squadron was attacking Fort Sumter, the result might have been different. But only about four thousand of Hunter's troops
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
ew York while on his way to his new post of duty, and Admiral Dahlgren was ordered to the command of the squadron. That off southern end of it, to command the approaches down John A. Dahlgren. the Stono River. Another was erected on Folly Rive unsuspected batteries opened a tremendous cannonade, and Dahlgren's monitors, Weehawken, Catskill, Montauk, and Nahant, at give battle. After a two-hours' cannonade, during which Dahlgren's guns were directed toward Fort Wagner to keep its garriuld the Confederates attempt an advance from Fort Wagner, Dahlgren's guns would fatally sweep them with an enfilading fire. orth's, under the direction of Commander F. A. Parker, of Dahlgren's squadron, and ten siege-mortars. In addition to these 7th, August. the heavy guns of twelve batteries and from Dahlgren's entire naval force at hand, were opened on Forts Sumtery, as soon as that fortress was effectually silenced, but Dahlgren did not think it prudent to do so, chiefly because he bel
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
Morgan in East Tennessee, 282. his last raid into Kentucky he receives a staggering blow, 283. the author in the great Valley of East Tennessee Governor Brownlow and his family, 284. Greenville death of Morgan, the guerrilla chief, 285. journey from Greenville to Richmond, 286. Knoxville threatened by Breckinridge Richmond threatened by General Butler, 287. Kilpatrick's raid to Richmond, 288. fortifications around Richmond, 289. repulse of the Nationals at Richmond death of Colonel Dahlgren, 290. propriety of murdering Union prisoners considered by the Conspirators preparations for blowing up Libby Prison with the prisoners, 291. Ulysses S. Grant, General-in chief takes command reorganizes the Army of the Potomac, 292. co-operating forces, 293. Grant's ideas about making War patriotic Governors, 294. The failure of the Red River expedition, and the expulsion of Steele from the country below the Arkansas River, by which two-thirds of the State of Arkansas was gi
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