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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
transferred fifty of her crew to this vessel, and at 50 minutes past 9, Captain P. U. Murphy came on board and surrendered his sword and vessel. She had five killed and ten wounded, including the Captain, two of whom have since died. The dead and wounded were attended to. The remainder of her crew and officers were sent to the Port Royal. Put engineers and firemen on board and steamed to the fleet, reporting the capture of the Confederate steamer Selma, which vessel mounted two 9-inch Dahlgren smooth-bore, one 6 1/2 --inch rifle and one 8 1/2 --inch smooth-bore, all on pivot, with a crew, all told, of 94 men. I am much indebted to the executive officer, H. J. Sleeper, for his cool, prompt, and officer-like conduct; he is a valuable officer. For the efficient handling of the vessel, I am much indebted to Acting-Master N. M. Dyer, who had permission to go North on leave, but volunteered to remain to assist in the attack upon the forts. Acting-Ensign John White was cool and del
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
ockade at that moment. The Oneida was one of the fine ships built at the beginning of the war, and was supposed to be a 12-knot vessel. Her armament consisted of two 11-inch Dahlgrens (one forward and the other aft), four 32-pounders and three Dahlgren 30-pounder rifles. The Winona carried one 11-inch Dahlgren pivot-gun (forward), and two 32-pounders; and the schooner Rachel Seaman (bomb vessel), which happened to be beating up to the bar at the time, carried two 32-pounders. The Oneida, owiDahlgren pivot-gun (forward), and two 32-pounders; and the schooner Rachel Seaman (bomb vessel), which happened to be beating up to the bar at the time, carried two 32-pounders. The Oneida, owing to repairs that were going on, could not carry a full press of steam, and may be said to have been caught napping. Commander Maffitt could not have chosen a more auspicious time to attempt his daring feat, though, be it said to his credit, he had made up his mind to run through the whole blockading fleet if necessary. It was his last chance; he had only to do that or run his vessel on shore and burn her, for she was of no use to the Confederates in her then condition. As soon as Maffit
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
th Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864of work done by South Atlantic Squadron under Dahlgren. actions in which iron-clads were engaged. d as unassailable by land forces as ever, and Dahlgren was no nearer getting into Charleston than Duand men. This was a serious loss to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, who was at that moment urging the Gov were immediately made between him and Rear-Admiral Dahlgren for a descent on Morris Island, where operation of a regular siege. And here Admiral Dahlgren gives a very good reason why the delay inday before the last assault was contemplated, Dahlgren took in his whole force of iron-clads and batattered than any in the Monitor fleet. Admiral Dahlgren, however, did in at measure rectify this vy while the troops were disembarking, Rear-Admiral Dahlgren soon after returned to Port Royal, lea64, the Navy Department had written to Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, informing him that it had received no[13 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
les, making the total number of guns in this formidable work seventy-five. The sea-front was intended to prevent the enemy's vessels from running through New Inlet into Cape Fear River, or landing troops on Federal Point — an unnecessary precaution, since nature had placed greater obstacles to vessels of any size crossing the bar, in the shape of shoal water. One mile westward of the Mound Battery, at the end of Federal Point, was a heavy-armed earth-work mounting six or eight 11-inch Dahlgren guns, fitted exactly as if on the deck of a ship. This was Fort Buchanan, and it was officered and manned from the Confederate Navy. It commanded the channel and a shoal called the Rips, over which no vessel drawing more than eleven feet could pass at high water. This is a general sketch of Fort Fisher. The details were similar to those of other fortifications of this kind. It was the evident intention of the Confederates to prevent a landing of the Federal troops or to dislodge them
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
lag-ship Harvest Moon sunk by torpedoes. Admiral Dahlgren relieved. complimentary letter from Secr In the latter part of November, 1864, Rear-Admiral Dahlgren received information that General Sherress of twenty miles through a thick fog, Admiral Dahlgren had the satisfaction of reaching the apporder, to cover the landing of the troops, Admiral Dahlgren returning to his duty afloat. After Gepposition, and on the 12th of December Rear-Admiral Dahlgren opened communication with General Sherrman in person presented himself on board Admiral Dahlgren's flag-ship, and was warmly greeted by ofgements were made by General Sherman with Admiral Dahlgren, that, while the former should invest Savvery respectfully, your obedient servant, J. A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic on Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren, Washington, D. C. South Atlantic Squadron, January 1, 1865. Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren, Commanding. Staff Lieutenan
lock, which he threw from her lower deck into her hold, indicating by the splash that the water was already over her orlop deck. He returned immediately, and reported the fact to Capt. Paulding, who thereupon decided to desist from further attempts to save her, but to mutilate the guns in the Yard, fire the vessels, ship-houses, and other structures, and blow up the (stone) dry dock. Some of the old and relatively worthless guns were dismantled by knocking off their trunnions; but the new Dahlgren guns proved so tough that not one of them was or could thus be rendered useless. Capt. Paulding now recalled the order he had given Lieut. Wise to blow up the dry dock, and ordered trains to be laid instead, so that, at a signal, the ships might be fired. This was accordingly done; but the previous partial submersion of the ships, under Capt. McCauley's unaccountable order to scuttle them, of course prevented their destruction. Thus, when the Plymouth was reached in its turn by Lieut. Wi
veral more are in process of construction. The country cannot attend too earnestly to the dangers which threaten our blockading fleets, and the gunboats and steamers on the Southern rivers. X. off Charleston, February 22, 1864. Order by Admiral Dahlgren. flag-steamer Philadelphia, Port Royal harbor, S. C., Feb. 19, 1864. Order no. 50: The Housatonic has just been torpedoed by a rebel David, and sunk almost instantly. It was at night, and the water smooth. The success of thit night, and keep underweigh, until these preparations are completed. All the boats must be on the patrol when the vessel is not in movement. The commanders of vessels are required to use their utmost vigilance — nothing less will serve. I intend to recommend to the Navy Department the assignment of a large reward, as prize-money, to crews or vessels who shall capture, or, beyond doubt, destroy one of these torpedo boats. John A. Dahlgren, Rear-Admiral, Commanding S. A. B. Squadron.
ion of Florida, west of the St. John's River, will not be out of place. Under date of the twenty-second December, 1863, I was authorized by you to undertake such operations in my department as I might deem best, suggesting conference with Admiral Dahlgren, etc. On January fourteenth, 1864, I wrote you that, unless it would interfere with the views of the War Department, I should occupy the west bank of the St. John's River in Florida very soon, and establish small depots there, preparatoryonstration in your favor, which you look upon as of great importance. All this is upon the presumption that the demonstration can and will be made, although contingent not only upon my power and disposition to do so, but upon the consent of Admiral Dahlgren, with whom I cannot communicate in less than ten days. You must have forgotten my last instructions, which were for the present to hold Baldwin and the St. Mary's south prong as your outposts to the westward of Jacksonville, and to occupy Pi
General Howard, had succeeded in reaching Admiral Dahlgren and General Foster, and that he was expecwith him down the sound, in hopes to meet Admiral Dahlgren. But we did not meet him until we reacheitable for navigating the Ogeechee River. Admiral Dahlgren very kindly furnished me with all the dat and she was unable to make the passage. Admiral Dahlgren took me in his barge, and pulling in the d the place during the previous night. Admiral Dahlgren proceeded up the Vernon River in his bargdoes, which have been removed by order of Admiral Dahlgren, so that Savannah already fulfils the impccasion to express my heartfelt thanks to Admiral Dahlgren and the officers and men of his fleet, asd to be a tug, sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren, for the purpose of communicating with us reached the fleet, and communicated with Admiral Dahlgren. Until now I had been uncertain as to thers that we met. I tender my thanks to Admiral Dahlgren and Major-General Foster for their courte
Captain McClintock, aided by Lieutenant Sampson, Signal Officers, speedily communicated with the vessel, which proved to be a tug, sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren, for the purpose of communicating with us. Just as the signal officer of the stealer inquired if McAllister was ours, we noticed a brisker fire at the Forthat I had sent down the Ogeechee, on arriving at the Savannah Canal, had succeeded in passing all obstructions, and reached the fleet, and communicated with Admiral Dahlgren. Until now I had been uncertain as to the fate of the party. After the General had written several despatches, we returned to General Hazen's quarters, flonel William Tweedale, for the aid he afforded the Chief-Engineer in building wagon and foot-bridges across the rivers that we met. I tender my thanks to Admiral Dahlgren and Major-General Foster for their courtesy, and the assistance they rendered me in the operations near Savannah. I wish to bring before the Commander-in-
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