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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, have sent us a copy of their beautifully gotten up memoir of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, by his widow, Mrs. M. V. Dahlgren. The book is largely autobiographical, as it quotected. The battery consisted of ten guns, four single-banded Brooke rifles and six nine-inch Dahlgren's shell guns. Two of the rifles, bow and stern pivots, were seven-inch, of 14,500 pounds; the of essential service to us. On this occasion the following dispatch from General Gilmore to Admiral Dahlgren had been intercepted, and in General Beauregard's possession hours before the assault: Contme elapsed, however, before these changes were completed, and I am unable to understand why Admiral Dahlgren did not meanwhile avail himself of the opening thus offered and push with his iron-clads fond and naval forces, that two independent expeditions were organized for this attack-one by Admiral Dahlgren, the other by General Gilmore. The report says: The only arrangement for concert of action
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
s for this admirable edition of a book which has long been noted for its real ability, and whose author President Davis justly pronounces the fairest and most careful of the Northern writers on the war. We expect to have hereafter a full review of the book, and to point out some very serious errors into which the author has fallen; but meantime we advise our friends to buy the book. The publishers, J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston, have sent us a copy of their beautifully gotten up memoir of Admiral John A. Dahlgren, by his widow, Mrs. M. V. Dahlgren. The book is largely autobiographical, as it quotes fully from the diaries, letters, etc., of the distinguished Admiral, and touches on many matters of deepest interest, and historic importance, to which we shall hereafter give attention. The Bivouac, Louisville, Ky., for December, is an interesting and valuable number, and we again commend it as worthy of a wide circulation. We thank the editors for kindly reference to our Papers.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Services of the Virginia (Merrimac). (search)
Joints were broken where there were more than two courses. The hull, extending two feet below the roof, was plated with one inch iron; it was intended that it should have had three inches. The prow was of cast iron, wedge-shape, and weighed 1,500 pounds. It was about two feet under water, and projected two feet from the stem; it was not well fastened. The rudder and propeller were unprotected. The battery consisted of ten guns, four single-banded Brooke rifles and six nine-inch Dahlgren's shell guns. Two of the rifles, bow and stern pivots, were seven-inch, of 14,500 pounds; the other two were 6.4-inch (32 pounds calibre), of 9,000 pounds, one on each broadside. The nine-inch gun on each side nearest the furnaces was fitted for firing hot shot. A few nine-inch shot with extra windage were cast for hot shot. No other solid shot were on board during the fight. The engines were the same the vessel had whilst in the United States Navy. They were radically defective, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
eral prisoner. More than once the knowledge thus acquired proved of essential service to us. On this occasion the following dispatch from General Gilmore to Admiral Dahlgren had been intercepted, and in General Beauregard's possession hours before the assault: Continue the bombardment throughout the day; at sunset redouble it. Thchannel face, in which the new battery was placed. Some little time elapsed, however, before these changes were completed, and I am unable to understand why Admiral Dahlgren did not meanwhile avail himself of the opening thus offered and push with his iron-clads for the inner harbor. We certainly looked for such a dash, and Genelmore's report, as an evidence of a want of harmony between the land and naval forces, that two independent expeditions were organized for this attack-one by Admiral Dahlgren, the other by General Gilmore. The report says: The only arrangement for concert of action between the two parties, that were finally made, were intended si
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
an amiable guest, whose brain was soon exhilarated with the sparkling wine, and his manly soul captivated by the gracious diplomacy and finesse of his father's quondam sweetheart. It was by this device and strategy that Mrs. Seddon detained Colonel Dahlgren about the length of time required by General Wise and Mr. Hobson to speed to Richmond and notify her husband of the great peril to the young nation's capital, for she was advised of their flight to Richmond. Thus, it was late that evening wling wine, and his manly soul captivated by the gracious diplomacy and finesse of his father's quondam sweetheart. It was by this device and strategy that Mrs. Seddon detained Colonel Dahlgren about the length of time required by General Wise and Mr. Hobson to speed to Richmond and notify her husband of the great peril to the young nation's capital, for she was advised of their flight to Richmond. Thus, it was late that evening when young Dahlgren reached the beleagured forts around Richmond.
ednesday night or yesterday. Gen. Colquitt is now in command of the forces on Morris Island. We give below some interesting particulars of the siege from Northern and Southern papers. The following is an Official Dispatch from Admiral Dahlgren--the death of Capt. Rodgers. Flag Steamer Dinsmore, Off Morris Island, August 18, 1863. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: Sir --Yesterday was begun another series of operations against the enemy's works. Ea directed that all respect be paid to his remains, and the country will not, I am sure, omit to honor the memory of one who has not spared his life in her hour of trial.-- I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant. John A. Dahlgren, Rear Admiral, Comd'g South Atlantic Block'g Squadron. Accounts of the bombardment — effects of the iron-clads firing. The Charleston correspondence of the New York Herald, dated the 17th, gives us some very readable matter about
The Daily Dispatch: May 13, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Yankee Iron-Clad Navy--Admiral Dahlgren's opinion of monitors. (search)
The Yankee Iron-Clad Navy--Admiral Dahlgren's opinion of monitors. We have before us a copy of Rear Admiral Dahlgren's report to the Secretary of the Navy, of the services of the monitors before Charleston. The concluding portions of the report are of a general character as to the services and capabilities of the monitors, Rear Admiral Dahlgren's report to the Secretary of the Navy, of the services of the monitors before Charleston. The concluding portions of the report are of a general character as to the services and capabilities of the monitors, which we give in full. The accompanying report is from Commodore John Rodgers, who has had more experience with monitors in actual warfare than any other officer of the navy: After conflicts. The operations of the iron-clads against Morris Island were appropriately closed by a severe contest with Fort Moultrie, Batteries Bhastily and under great pressure of business, which will; I hope, excuse such imperfections as may have inadvertently occurred. With more leisure I could do full justice to this interesting subject. I have the honor to be, &c. John A. Dahlgren, Rear Admiral, Commanding S. A. B. S. Hon. Gidson Weles, Secretary of the Navy.
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