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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
now, but at any rate, as there was nothing else to do, he took his departure, withdrew the soldiers, and we were left to life, liberty, and something to eat. Visit from General Meade. Of a different kind, and far more pleasant is the last thing I shall put down in these reminiscences. More pleasant because it relates to a visit we had from General George C. Meade. My mother, who still lives a vigorous old lady—though she doesn't think so—of 80 years, was a daughter of the late George M. Dallas, Vice-President under Mr. Polk, and was related to or connected by marriage with General Meade. They had known each other well before the war, but, of course, had not seen each other since it began, as my mother was all the while in Richmond. One morning we were much surprised, and, indeed, somewhat startled, by seeing a very distinguished-looking man, wearing the insignia of a United States general, stop and dismount before our front door. He was accompanied, I think, by his staff,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
now, but at any rate, as there was nothing else to do, he took his departure, withdrew the soldiers, and we were left to life, liberty, and something to eat. Visit from General Meade. Of a different kind, and far more pleasant is the last thing I shall put down in these reminiscences. More pleasant because it relates to a visit we had from General George C. Meade. My mother, who still lives a vigorous old lady—though she doesn't think so—of 80 years, was a daughter of the late George M. Dallas, Vice-President under Mr. Polk, and was related to or connected by marriage with General Meade. They had known each other well before the war, but, of course, had not seen each other since it began, as my mother was all the while in Richmond. One morning we were much surprised, and, indeed, somewhat startled, by seeing a very distinguished-looking man, wearing the insignia of a United States general, stop and dismount before our front door. He was accompanied, I think, by his staff,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ant, 9. Shiloh, Battle of, 357. Slaves, General Cleburne's plan to put into the army, 173; Extension of territory for 18. Squirrel Level Fort, 289. Stephens, A. H., his fidelity and acumen, 185. Stuart, General J. E. B., 169; how killed, 227, 335. Surratt, Mrs., Execution of, 122. Taylor, Governor Robert L., 361. Toney, Marcus B., 193 Toombs, General Robert 346. Torpedo boats, David, 292, Holland, of C. S. Navy, 293. Thomas, L. B., 223. Tucker, Beverley, 160; Rev. Dallas, 153. Virginia, Advisory Council of War in 1861, 364; Officers of 1st Regiment infantry, 364; 26th Infantry, company G, Roll of, 210; how she supplied Maryland with arms, 163. Wallace, Charles Montriou, 366. War 1861-5, how conducted by the Federals, 101; unrestricted license to burn and plunder, 111; private property destroyed by, 123; spoils, how divided. 114; order of General Lee at Chambersburn, 119; London Times on the, 121; Sewards bell, 122; conduct of Confederates at Gettysb