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d six Federal recruiting officers on board taken prisoners. The rebels then searched the train, but for some unknown reason did not enter the express car in which there were three hundred Enfield rifles and two tons of military clothing, destined for Nebraska. Two of the captured officers were released on the spot, and three of the four others were set at liberty a few hours afterwards.--N. Y. World, October 16. The Southern Commercial Convention assembled at Macon, Ga., this day.-Isaac Davenport, of Richmond, Va., of the firm of I. and B. Davenport, gave a check for ten thousand dollars to the Southern Confederacy, which was owing to Northern creditors.--The Confederate Government authorized General Winder to arrest all Yankees who may venture there in concern for their former rights of property in the South.--Richmond Examiner, October 8. William F. Springer, a citizen of Philadelphia, returned to his home, from Charlotte, N. C., after an absence of several months, a port
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
cordance with President's proclamation, March 30, meets......April 1, 1867 Special session of the Senate adjourns sine die......April 19, 1867 Expedition against the Indians in western Kansas, led by Generals Hancock and Custer......April 30, 1867 Jefferson Davis taken to Richmond on habeas corpus and admitted to bail in $100,000; sureties, Horace Greeley and Augustus Schell, of New York; Aristides Welsh and David K. Jackman, of Philadelphia; W. H. McFarland, Richard B. Haxall, Isaac Davenport, Abraham Warwick, G. A. Myers, W. W. Crump, James Lyons, J. A. Meredith, W. H. Lyons, John M. Botts, Thomas W. Boswell, and James Thomas, Jr., of Virginia......May 13, 1867 Congress reassembles......July 3, 1867 Supplementary reconstruction bill, reported July 8, vetoed and passed over the veto......July 19, 1867 Congress adjourns to Nov. 21, after a session of eighteen days......July 20, 1867 Catharine Maria Sedgwick, authoress, born in 1789, dies near Roxbury, Mass.......J
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
th a Massachusetts company, pursues along Long Island Sound. With Sassacus, their sachem, the Pequods take shelter in a swamp near Fairfield, and after another severe fight surrender, but their sachem and a few followers escape......July 13, 1637 [These fled to the Mohawks, who treacherously murdered them. The prisoners were sold into slavery or incorporated with other tribes. There remained not a sannup nor a squaw, not a warrior nor a child. ] the Hector lands at Boston Rev. John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton, and Edward Hopkins......July 26, 1637 Mr. Eaton and others explore the lands and harbors of Connecticut on the seacoast, and select Quinipiack (now New Haven) for a settlement in the autumn of......1637 Rev. John Davenport, Mr. Eaton, and others sail from Boston and arrive at Quinipiack about the middle of......April, 1638 Gloomy prospects of the colonists. Great earthquake......June 1, 1638 Colonists purchase land in and about New Haven of the Indians......
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
he penalty was fixed at $100,000, but this was not effected until Judge Underwood had interpolated a stump speech, lauding the government of the United States and the beneficence of its administration. The bail bond, in the usual form of such bonds, was then given, Mr. Greeley signing first. The sureties were Horace Greeley, Augustus Schell, Horace F. Clark, Gerrit Smith, and Cornelius Vanderbilt, of New York; Aristides Welsh and David K. Jackman, of Philadelphia; R. Barton Haxall, Isaac Davenport, Abraham Warwick, Gustavus A. Myers, W. W. Crump, James Lyons, John A. Meredith, W. H. Lyons, John Minor Botts, Thomas W. Doswell, James Thomas, Jr., and Thomas R. Price, of Virginia. When the bond was duly executed the marshal was directed to discharge the prisoner, which was done amid deafening applause. The streets around the Custom House were crowded with people awaiting the result. As soon as the decision was announced some one ran to the Main-street window of the Custom Hou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
he penalty was fixed at $100,000, but this was not effected until Judge Underwood had interpolated a stump speech, lauding the government of the United States and the beneficence of its administration. The bail bond, in the usual form of such bonds, was then given, Mr. Greeley signing first. The sureties were Horace Greeley, Augustus Schell, Horace F. Clark, Gerrit Smith, and Cornelius Vanderbilt, of New York; Aristides Welsh and David K. Jackman, of Philadelphia; R. Barton Haxall, Isaac Davenport, Abraham Warwick, Gustavus A. Myers, W. W. Crump, James Lyons, John A. Meredith, W. H. Lyons, John Minor Botts, Thomas W. Doswell, James Thomas, Jr., and Thomas R. Price, of Virginia. When the bond was duly executed the marshal was directed to discharge the prisoner, which was done amid deafening applause. The streets around the Custom House were crowded with people awaiting the result. As soon as the decision was announced some one ran to the Main-street window of the Custom Hou
red as above the Board may administer oaths and examine witnesses, and may require the attendance of the Ancestor and Collector of the city taxes, and such other city officers as have opportunities of acquainting themselves with the pecuniary condition of the residents of the city. Committee. 1st District--1st street, below Cary, out west to the corporation line — George Gibson and Alexander Rutherford. 2d. From Bread to Cary, from 1st to corporation line — Abel U. Mayo and Isaac Davenport, Jr. 3d. From Broad to Leigh, from 1st to Henry — W. E. Bigelow and T. C. G. Drewey. 4th. From 1st to Brooke avenue, from Leigh to corporate limits — A. L. Edwards and J. Bunting. 5th. From Henry and Brooke avenue, west to corporation line — Roger Martin and John W. Rison. 6th. From 1st to 4th, from Broad to Penitentiary Pond — Asa Snyder and Jno Knowles. 7th. From 1st and 3d sts, from Broad to the corporate limits--Dr. John H. Ellerson and George W. Jones. 8th
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1865., [Electronic resource], Examination for Attempted Incendiarism — the accused sent on. (search)
to the cars to see his son off, and am also positive that he told me it was 9 o'clock when he returned and examined his store, to see if all was right. Mr. Isaac Davenport sworn.--Was called at half-past 2 o'clock Sunday morning to make a presentment against Mr. Edwards for trying to set fire to his store. Is an officer in the, who was going home. Captain David Jackson sworn.--Is captain of police. Arrested Edwards at the instance of three gentlemen upon a warrant made out by Mr. Davenport. Corroborated statement of others as to the condition of things in the store. Edwards told him he had left his store between 6 and 7, in company with Mr. My things in the store. Was the first to ascend the ladder. Examined door leading into adjoining store — positive that it had not been opened that night. Isaac Davenport recalled.--Made a statement in substance that it was not unusual for the amount of insurance upon a store to be considerably in excess of the value of the sto