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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
aw's division, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw. Kershaw's Brigade, Col. John W. Henagan: 2d S. C., Lieut.-Col. F. Gaillard; 3d S. C., Col. James D. Nance; 7th S. C., Capt. James Mitchell; 8th S. C., Lieut.-Col. E. T. Stackhouse; 15th S. C., Col. John B. Davis; 3d S. C. Battalion, Capt. B. M. Whitener. Humphreys's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Benjamin G. Humphreys: 13th Miss., Maj. G. L. Donald; 17th Miss.,----; Name not to be found in the Official records. 18th Miss., Capt. W. H. Lewis;. 21st Miss., Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright: 3d Ga.,----; 22d Ga.,----; 48th Ga.,----; 2d Ga. Batt'n, Maj. C. J. Moffett. Perry's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. A. Perry: 2d Fla.,----; 5th Fla.,----; 8th Fla.,----. Heth's division, Maj.-Gen. Henry Heth. Davis's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph R. Davis: 2d Miss.,----; 11th Miss.,----; 42d Miss.,----; 55th N. C.,----. Cooke's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John R. Cooke: 15th N. C.,----; 27th N. C.,----; 46th N. C.,----; 48th N. C.,----. Kirkland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
13th Miss., Lieut.-Col. A. G. O'Brien; 17th Miss., Capt. J. C. Cochran; 18th Miss., Lieut.-Col. William H. Luse; 21st Miss., Col. D. N. Moody. Bryan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Goode Bryan: 10th Ga., Col. Willis C. Holt; 50th Ga., Col. P. McGlashan; 51st Ga., Lieut.-Col. James Dickey; 53d Ga., Col. J. P. Simms. Conner's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James Conner: 2d S. C., Col. J. D. Kennedy; 3d S. C., Lieut.-Col. R. C. Moffett; 7th S. C., Capt. E. J. Goggans; 8th S. C., Col. J. W. Henagan; 15th S. C., Col. J. B. Davis; 20th S. C., Col. S. M. Boykin; 3d S. C. Batt'n, Lieut.-Col. W. G. Rice. artillery, Brig.-Gen. W. N. Pendleton commanded the artillery of the army. Brig.-Gen. E. P. Alexander. Cabell's Battalion, Col. H. C. Cabell: Va. Battery, Capt. R. M. Anderson; Ga. Battery, Lieut. Morgan Callaway; Ga. Battery, Capt. H. H. Carlton; N. C. Battery, Capt. Basil C. Manly. Huger's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. F. Huger: S. C. Battery, Capt. W. W. Fickling; La. Battery (Moody's), Lieut. J. C. Parkinson;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
regulars), Col. R. A. Wayne; 5th Ga., Col. C. P. Daniel; 5th Ga. Reserves, Maj. C. E. McGregor; 32d Ga., Lieut.-Col. E. 11. Bacon, Jr.; 47th Ga. and Bonaud's Battalion,----. Conner's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John D, Kennedy: 2d S. C. (consolidated 2d and 20th S. C., and Blanchard's Reserves), Col. William Wallace; 3d S. C. (consolidated 3d and 8th S. C., 3d S. C. Batt'n, and Blanchard's Reserves), Col. E. T. Stackhouse; 7th S. C. (consolidated 7th and 15th S. C., and Blanchard's Reserves), Col. John B. Davis. artillery, Maj. A. Burnet Rhett: Ga. Battery, Capt. R. W. Anderson, Lieut. H. S. Greaves; Ga. Battery, Capt. John W. Brooks; La. Battery, Capt. G. Le Gardeur, Jr.; S. C. Battery, Capt. Ed. L. Parker; S. C. Battery, Capt. H. M. Stuart; Ga. Battery, Capt. J. F. Wheaton. Lee's Corps, At Bentonville consisted of Stevenson's, Clayton's, and Hill's divisions, commanded by Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill. Col. J. G. Coltart commanded Hill's division.Lieut.-Gen. S. D. Lee. Escort, Capt. G. G
lvarado was taken, he was placed in charge as prize-master. She was chased ashore by one of our fleet and burned. John B. Davis, the first lieutenant, was on board the Confederate man-of-war Winslow when she seized a vessel off the North Carolin was born in Clifton, England. He is a seaman, and was on board the brig Mary Goodel when she was captured by the Jeff. Davis. He enlisted in the Davis as boatswain, and while on board, the brigantine Santa Clara and bark Alvarado were captured. k, aged twenty-six, born in Redbank, N. J.; Peter Parry, seaman, aged eighteen, born in South Carolina--was on the Jeff. Davis; James McGivern, seaman, aged twenty-two, born in Liverpool; John Burns, seaman, aged forty-five, born in Dublin; John Coer captain, will command the Isabel; John Cameron, seaman, aged thirty-two years, a native of Scotland, was on the Jeff. Davis when she captured the barks Alvarado, Enchantress, and schooner Waring; received as his share of prize-money, five dollar
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ts served in the forts and batteries of the harbor throughout the war, with the greatest distinction, as will afterward appear. These troops, with the Fourth brigade, South Carolina militia, were under the orders of the government and were practically investing Fort Sumter. The States of Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas, having left the Union during the month of January, and the Confederate government having been organized early in February, at Montgomery, President Davis, on the 1st of March, ordered Brigadier-General Beauregard to Charleston to report for duty to Governor Pickens. Thenceforward this distinguished soldier became the presiding genius of military operations in and around Charleston. Repeated demands having been made upon Major Anderson, and upon the President, for the relinquishment of Fort Sumter, and these demands having been refused and the government at Washington having concluded to supply and reinforce the fort by force of arms,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
s the island from Secessionville on its left to Fort Pemberton, on the Stono, on its right. This policy was unpopular with the governor, the military generally and the people, and made General Pemberton, an honest and patriotic soldier, both unpopular and mistrusted. The idea was abroad that he did not mean to defend the city to the last; that he was not confident of success, and that he was not equal to the emergency. These sentiments were freely communicated to General Lee and to President Davis by the governor and by prominent citizens of the State. General Ripley, who commanded the harbor defenses and the forces on James island, regarded the abandonment of Fort Palmetto as a fatal mistake, and at his request, he was ordered to join General Lee in front of Richmond. General Ripley had shown great energy and unusual ability as an artillery officer, and possessed the full confidence of the military and the people. He had made the Palmetto a strong battery and had put in comma
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
s cavalry. On the 19th, the President, fearing that Richmond would be endangered, telegraphed General Lee that until movements of the enemy were more developed he would retain those commands before the capital. Finally, on the 24th, Lee wrote Mr. Davis that he had intercepted a letter from General Pope to General Halleck (commander-in-chief of the United States armies), dated August 20th, stating his whole force for duty at 45,000, independent of Burnside, and revealing his plan to hold Lee ihole army immediately, and all available troops, and added: Hampton's cavalry I particularly require. Richmond, he wrote, must rely upon her defenses and field batteries. On the 26th, McLaws and D. H. Hill and Hampton were ordered to Lee, and Mr. Davis wrote him: Confidence in you overcomes the view that otherwise would be taken of the exposed condition of Richmond, and the troops retained for the defense of the capital are surrendered to you on a renewed request. Neither of these commands w
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ph road up to the Occoquan. This would bring him on the line between Alexandria and Fredericksburg. His detachments were from the First South Carolina, Lieut.-Col. J. D. Twiggs; Second South Carolina, Col. M. C. Butler; First North Carolina, Lieut.-Col. James B. Gordon; Jeff Davis legion, Lieutenant-Colonel Martin, and the Cobb legion, Capt. Jerry Rich, a force of 520 men. Butler commanded the First North Carolina, Second South Carolina, and Cobb legion; Martin the First South Carolina and Davis legion. On the night of the 11th, the command bivouacked within 16 miles of Dumfries, and by daylight on the 12th, Hampton had his troops on the main approaches immediately at the town. The surprise was complete, and Butler, dashing in, received the surrender after firing a few shots. Fifty-odd prisoners, 24 sutler's wagons and the telegraph operator with his battery, were the only fruits of this dash. The command was disappointed at not finding the large garrison they confidently expec
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
nded. Both generals lost artillery, Lee eight pieces and Hooker thirteen, with 1,500 rounds of ammunition. General Lee gathered from the field, besides tents and army stores of various kinds, 19,500 rifles and muskets, and over 300,000 rounds of infantry ammunition. After the battle, in his general orders of congratulation, General Lee recommended that the troops unite on Sunday next, in ascribing to the Lord of Hosts the glory due unto His name, and quoted the following letter from President Davis: General Lee: I have received your dispatch, and rev-erently unite with you in giving praise to God for the success with which He has crowned our arms. In the name of the people I offer my thanks to you and the troops under your command for this addition to the unprecedented series of great victories, which your army has achieved. The universal rejoicing produced by this happy result, will be mingled with general regret for the good and brave who are numbered among the killed and
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
rom his headquarters at Hilton Head, General Gillmore issued his order for the disposition of two divisions designed to attack Morris island. The First was commanded by Brigadier-General Terry, its brigades by Brigadier-General Stevenson and Colonel Davis; the Second by Brigadier-General Seymour, its brigades by Brigadier-Generals Vogdes and Strong. The brigade of Vogdes was already on Folly island, and had been since April 7th; Strong landed on the 6th of July, and Stevenson subsequently. On the 9th, General Beauregard telegraphed Mr. Davis of the presence in Stono and off the bar of thirty-eight vessels and five monitors, and at noon of the same day to Governor Bonham, and to Richmond, that an attack on Sumter along Folly and Morris islands is evidently imminent. General Mercer, at Savannah, and General Whiting, at Wilmington, were asked for support, and Generals Hagood and Walker were ordered to hold all available troops in the Second and Third districts in readiness, to mar
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