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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
ame city-4. A number of soldiers were wounded. The citizens killed were: Robert W. Davis, Philip S. Miles, John McCann, John McMahon, William R. Clark, James Carr, The lower classes generally concealed their injuries. The death of Mr. Robert W. Davis was one of the most tragic incidents of the day. Mr. Davis was a member Mr. Davis was a member of the firm of Paynter, Davis & Co., dry goods dealers, on Baltimore street, and one of the most prominent citizens of Baltimore. Early on the morning of the riot Davis & Co., dry goods dealers, on Baltimore street, and one of the most prominent citizens of Baltimore. Early on the morning of the riot he went out on the line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, a short distance from the city, for the purpose of looking at some land which he thought of purchasing. rnalist and lawyer of this city, and who is now City Solicitor of Baltimore. Mr. Davis was not aware that there had been a riot in the city, and as a car containingll asked him if he was hurt. I am killed, was all he said. When the news of Mr. Davis' death reached the city, it added fuel to the flames. Marshal Kane's thre
antry, Aug. 3, 1870. Honorably discharged at his own request, Sept. 10, 1870. Daniels, Charles H. Born in Massachusetts. Second Lieutenant, Regimental Quartermaster, 116th U. S. Colored Infantry. Brevet First Lieutenant, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865. Mustered out, Jan. 17, 1867. Daniels, Edward S. Born in Massachusetts. Private, 1st Mass. Infantry, May 23, 1861. Discharged (disability), Oct. 4, 1862. Captain, 35th U. S. Colored Infantry. Discharged, May 18, 1866. Davis, Robert W. Sergeant, 4th Mass. Cavalry, Mar. 1, 1864. Discharged for promotion as Second Lieutenant, 33d U. S. Colored Infantry, Aug. 6, 1864. Captain, 104th U. S. Colored Infantry, June 15, 1865. Mustered out with regiment, Feb. 5, 1866. Day, Samuel E. Private, 1st Mass. Infantry, May 23, 1861. First Lieutenant, 37th U. S. Colored Infantry, Oct. 30, 1863. Brevet Major, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865. Captain, Mar. 1, 1866. Mustered out, Feb. 7, 1867. Dean, Chauncy C. Second L
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
Davis, H. T., 40 Davis, H. T., 267, 411, 519 Davis, Hasbrouck, 175, 411, 464, 519 Davis, I. P., Jr., 40 Davis, J. H., 267 Davis, J. H., 575 Davis, J. J., 268 Davis, J. R., 268 Davis, J. T., 211, 267, 519 Davis, J. W., 40 Davis, J. W., 268 Davis, J. W., 268 Davis, Jefferson, 643 Davis, John, 581 Davis, Joseph, 268 Davis, M. H., 268 Davis, M. M., 268 Davis, N. H., 175, 211, 411, 519 Davis, N. R., 40 Davis, P. A., 268, 411, 519 Davis, P. S., 211, 643 Davis, R. S., 412 Davis, R. W., 487 Davis, Robert, 411, 520 Davis, Roswell, 40 Davis, S. A., 380 Davis, T. H., 40 Davis, W. G., 268 Davis, W. H., 40 Davis, W. S., 211, 268, 520 Davis, W. W., 268 Davis, W. W., 268 Davis, W. W. H., 176, 268, 412, 464, 520 Davol, B. D., 268 Davol, G. S., 160 Dawes, J. C., 464 Dawes, R. C., 40 Dawson, T. W., 380 Day, Benjamin, 268 Day, C. O., 268 Day, D. L., 607 Day, E. E., 268 Day, G. H., 268 Day, J. M., 211 Day, J. W., 268 Day, Luther, 211 Day, M. S., 160 Day, S.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
Camden station, where they were loaded on trains and dispatched, panic-stricken, to Washington. Outside the city limits, however, after the danger had passed, some heroic soul signalized his devotion to the flag by shooting in cold blood Robert W. Davis, a reputable and well-known citizen and merchant, whose crime was alleged to have been a cheer for Jeff Davis and the South. That evening, April 9th, Marshal Kane telegraphed to Bradley T. Johnson at Frederick: Streets red with Maryland bloag of Maryland should always be upheld in the armies of the Confederate States. In these eight companies there were about five hundred men. They effected a temporary organization among themselves under their senior captain, and sent up through the regular channels to President Davis their application to have their battalion organized into the army of the Confederate States, with Charles S. Winder, late captain Ninth infantry, U. S. A., as colonel, and Bradley T. Johnson as lieutenant-colonel.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
y-six wounded. Twelve citizens, including Robert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the caached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed. The killing of Robert W. DavisRobert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the car windows, was an atrocious act, and tended more than an of bitterness against the Northern troops. Mr. Davis was a member of the wholesale firm of Pegram, Paynter & Davis, of Baltimore street. He was an Irishman by birth and had married in Virginia. Oday in an editorial denounced the killing of Mr. Davis as a wanton and deliberate murder. The storte Major Thomas W. Hall, who had his hand on Mr. Davis' shoulder when he fell, is as follows: Mr change cars. On the way I was overtaken by Mr. Davis, who joined me, and with him passed through e had gone up the road to destroy the track, Mr. Davis and I determined to walk out a short distance windows of the first cars were closed, and Mr. Davis and I were speculating as to whether the tro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
y-six wounded. Twelve citizens, including Robert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the caached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed. The killing of Robert W. DavisRobert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the car windows, was an atrocious act, and tended more than an of bitterness against the Northern troops. Mr. Davis was a member of the wholesale firm of Pegram, Paynter & Davis, of Baltimore street. He was an Irishman by birth and had married in Virginia. Oday in an editorial denounced the killing of Mr. Davis as a wanton and deliberate murder. The storte Major Thomas W. Hall, who had his hand on Mr. Davis' shoulder when he fell, is as follows: Mr change cars. On the way I was overtaken by Mr. Davis, who joined me, and with him passed through e had gone up the road to destroy the track, Mr. Davis and I determined to walk out a short distance windows of the first cars were closed, and Mr. Davis and I were speculating as to whether the tro
the result detailed elsewhere. The Shooting and Killing of Robert W. Davis, Esq.--inquest at the Southern Police station. The death of Robert W. Davis, Esq., at the hands of the Northern troops yesterday, has created an intense feeling in this community, especially among th he was an honored member, in the firm of Messrs. Pegram, Paynter & Davis, Baltimore street. He had gone out to the railroad track with the meceased's late residence, corner of Saratoga and Liberty streets, Mr. Davis leaves a widow, but no children. He was an Irishman by birth, anthe fearful deed of blood which had been enacted on Pratt street. Mr. Davis and his companions stepped aside to see the train pass, when two a dozen muskets were fired from the cars into the spectators, and Mr. Davis fell, Mr. Hall, who was leaning on the deceased's shoulder, said, "Davis, are you hurt?" to which he replied, "Yes, I am killed." He then relapsed into the agonies of death. The funeral of the deceased wi
A pretty Device. --Among the attractive features of the illumination last Friday night, was a mansion, in miniature, with its numerous windows lighted up, at the establishment of Roper & Murray, on Gevernor street. A figure of a soldier stood guard in front, and a card explained to passers-by that it was a model of President Davis' headquarters in Richmond.
ankee natures, if they in fact have any stomach for the war they have now inaugurated. They are the last people in the world to persist in a course of conduct that "won't pay." Of all people in the world they are the very ones least addicted to the folly of quarreling with their bread and butter. This war not only won't pay as a policy, but exposes them to the most stupendous losses. What people in the world have more property or larger interests afloat upon the ocean than they? And President Davis has hit them between wind and water with his prompt and pertinent proclamation, calling for privateers. That proclamation speaks to people of all nations and tongues, and invites the daring and enterprising from every quarter of the compass. The richest prize ever offered to a belligerent power is now offered to the South by the floating commerce of the Yankees. The fairest opportunity ever offered a fleetless nation for improvising a complete navy is now offered the South by the flo
The news from Baltimore. The last news from Baltimore indicates that the Black Republican Governor, Hicks, Winter Davis, and Brown, are demoralizing the Southern movement in Maryland. There ought to be an advance upon Washington instantly. If only five hundred troops are presented in that neighborhood, it will be of immense importance.
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