Your search returned 103 results in 14 document sections:

1 2
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
In 1800, Moreau, wishing to deceive Kray upon the true direction of his march, caused his left wing to be carried from Kehl towards Rastadt, whilst he filed with his army upon Stockach; his left, after simply showing itself, fell back then towards his centre by Friburg in Brisgau. In 1805, Napoleon, master of Vienna, threw the corps of Bernadotte upon Iglau, to scatter terror in Bohemia, and to paralyse the Arch-Duke Ferdinand, who was assembling a corps; he launches on the other side Davoust upon Presburg to impose upon Hungary; but he changed them immediately upon Brunn, in order that they should come and take part in the events which were to decide the whole campaign, and a signal victory became the result of these wise manoeuvres. Those kinds of operations, far from being contrary to principles, are necessary to favor their application. It will easily be conceived, from all that precedes, that absolute maxims could not be given upon operations so varied, and the success
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
n of the Russian army, he outflanked the left almost perpendicularly, whilst upon another side he sought to break the centre; but there was no simultaneousness in those attacks, that of the centre being already repulsed at eleven o'clock, whilst Davoust was not actively engaged upon the left until towards one o'clock. At Dresden he attacked by the two wings, for the first time perhaps in his life, because his center was sheltered by a fort and an intrenched camp; moreover, the attack of his in the midst of fifty thousand men, produces there all the miracles which Richepanse operated in that cut-throat place of Matenpot, where it was much more probable that he would be obliged to lay down his arms. At Wagram, the turning wing of Davoust had a great part in the success of the day; but if. the vigorous attack executed on the centre by Macdonald, Oudinot and Bernadotte had not opportunely seconded it, it is not certain that it would have been so. So many examples of opposite re
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
s thus that Ney, coming from the borders of Lake Constance, Lannes from Upper Suabia, Soult and Davoust from Bavaria and the Palatinate, Bernadotte and Augereau from Franconia, and the imperial guardia with the delicate mission of assembling the army, all dispersed from Strasburg to Erfurt. Davoust returned from this city, Oudinot from Frankfort, Massena enroute for Spain, retrograded by Strameaning; he not only persisted in endeavoring to unite the army at Ratisbon, but he even caused Davoust to return to that city, who had the good sense to fall back from Amberg in the direction of Ingf the passage of the Inn, by telegraph, arrived like lightning at Abensberg, at the moment when Davoust was about to find himself invested, and the army cut in two or scattered by a mass of a hundred ten copies of the famous decree, that by mistake the bridge of the centre had been assigned to Davoust, although he should have formed the right wing, whilst the bridge of the right had been assigne
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
cessitate. The grand army at Boulogne, which we have just cited, is the most evident proof of it. It seemed that its perfect organization should have secured it from every possible vicissitude. The centre under Marshal Soult, the right under Davoust, the left under Ney, the reserve under Lannes, presented a regular and formidable battle corps of thirteen divisions of infantry, without counting those of the guard and of the united grenadiers. Besides that, the corps of Bernadotte and Marmonlity and impulsion, without adding any strength. This was one of the causes of the small success of the French at Waterloo. If the column of Macdonald succeeded better at Wagram, it paid dearly for it, and but for the success of the attacks of Davoust and of Oudinot upon the left of the Arch-Duke, it is not probable that it would have came out victorious from the position in which, for a moment, it saw itself placed. When it is decided to risk such a mass, it is necessary, at least, to tak
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of battle with center and one wing reinforced: battle of Wagram, July 6, 1809. (search)
wing was about 11,000 yards, the accumulation of forces amounting, therefore, to from 11 to 12 men for every yard. Massenas's corps, with Bernadotte's, is opposite to Aderklaa. Oudinot's corps, with Lannes's, is opposite to Baumersdorf. Davoust, with his corps, is opposite to Neusiedel. Eugene, Wrede, and Marmont are in advance of Rahsdorf, in third and fourth lines of battle. On the left of the center, a battery of 100 guns forms the communication between the center and the leftr, this operation could not be executed with the necessary energy, as their total inferiority was too great; and, while they were attacking the French left wing, their own left wing and center were treated in the roughest manner. The Austrian left wing was outflanked by Davoust, and the retreat of their whole army was the consequence. The retreat was, however, effected in good order; and the loss on both sides was nearly equal, amounting to about 20,000 killed and wounded for each party.
advanced guard, he offers his own flank to the corps already more advanced or still behind. Davoust, while retreating from Ratisbon, before the battles of Abensberg, Eckmuhl, etc., formed in a sis; Soult on a parallel road to Jena, about 10 miles from this place, and 6 to 7 from the Guard; Davoust, Bernadotte, and Murat arrive at Naumburg, from whence Bernadotte has to march, on the 14th, to Dornburg, and Davoust to Apolda. A part of the cavalry is still at Auma, and the Bavarian division is left at Plauen to cover the French right flank. Naumburg is about 18 miles from Jena. If wehe whole army, and, by his arrival in front of the Prussians, keeps them in their position till Davoust arrives at Naumburg. If the Prussians attack him, their loss only becomes more certain, as thems the pivot in the manoeuvre, he is outflanked by Soult; and if he attacks the latter, Ney and Davoust are on his flanks. The result of this manoeuvre — which was, however, excellently favored by
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 5: Tactics.The twelve orders of battle, with examples of each.—Different Formations of infantry, cavalry, artillery, and engineers on the field of battle, with the Modes of bringing troops into action (search)
the very reverse of strategy — the latter being subject to more rigid and invariable rules. But whatever the plan adopted by the attacking force, it should seek to dislodge the enemy, either by piercing or turning his line. If it can conceal its real intentions and deceive him respecting the true point of attack, success will be more certain and decisive. A turning manoeuvre may frequently be employed with advantage at the same time with the main attack on the line. The operations of Davoust at Wagram, and Richepanse at Hohenlinden, are good examples under this head. The manoeuvre is, however, a difficult one, and unless executed with skill, may lead to disasters like the turning manoeuvres of the Austrians at Rivoli and Austerlitz, and of the French under Jourdan at Stackach, and under Marmont at Salamanca. We will now discuss the particular manner of arranging the troops on the line of battle, or the manner of employing each arm, without entering, however, much into the d
be in opposition; but it is unable of itself to resist a shock, and therefore should on no account wait to receive the charge of another body of mounted troops. It was on this account that Frederick directed his cavalry officers, under the severest penalties, never to receive a charge, but always to meet the attacking force half way. This is the only mode of preventing defeat. A good infantry can always sustain itself against the charges of cavalry. At the battle of Auerstedt, in 1806, Davoust ordered the divisions of Gudin to form squares to resist the Prussian cavalry, which, by means of a fog, had gained a most advantageous position. Blucher led his cavalry in repeated and impetuous charges, but all was in vain; the French infantry presented a front of iron. At the combat of Krasnoi, in 1812, the cavalry of Grouchy, Nansonty, and Bordesoult, attacked and overthrew the dragoons of Clarkof, but the Russian infantry under Neveroffskoi sustained itself against the repeated charg
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 15: military Education—Military schools of France, Prussia, Austria, Russia, England, &c.—Washington's reasons for establishing the West point Academy.—Rules of appointment and Promotion in foreign Services.—Absurdity and injustice of our own system. (search)
schools of Brienne and Paris, and had all the advantages of the best military and scientific instruction given in France. Dessaix was a pupil of the military school of Effiat, with all the advantages which wealth and nobility could procure. Davoust was a pupil of the military school of Auxerre, and a fellow-pupil with Napoleon in the military school of Paris. Kleber was educated at the military school of Bavaria. Eugene Beauharnais was a pupil of St. Germain-en-Loye, and had for his miliary glory Soult became a sub-lieutenant at twenty-two, a captain at twenty-four; the following year he passed through the several grades of chef-de-bataillon, colonel, and general of brigade, and became general of division at twenty-nine. Davoust was a sub-lieutenant at seventeen, a general of brigade at twenty-three, and general of division at twenty-five. Eugene Beauharnais entered the army at a very early age. He became chef-de-bataillon at nineteen, colonel at twenty-one, general
e upon the people. But what even at this stage of the war is very striking, and of good augury for the re-union which followed, is the absence, in general, of bitter hatred between the combatants. There is nothing of internicene, inextinguishable, irreconcilable enmity, or of the temper, acts, and words which beget this. Often we find the vanquished Southerner showing a good-humoured audacity, the victorious Northerner a good-humoured forbearance. Let us remember Carrier at Nantes, or Davoust at Hamburg, and then look at Grant's picture of himself and Sherman at Jackson, when their troops had just driven the enemy out of this capital of a rebel State, and were destroying the stores and war-materials there: Sherman and I went together into a manufactory which had not ceased work on account of the battle, nor for the entrance of Yankee troops. Our entrance did not seem to attract the attention of either the manager or the operatives, most of whom were girls. We looked on f
1 2