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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
avenger, had been caught by the Belgian officers at Kirundu (which I know well), was condemned to death, and shot. Thus retribution overtook him, too! Few in this country know that I am the prime cause of this advance of the Belgians against the Arab slave-raiders. Indeed, people little realise how I have practically destroyed this terrible slave-trade, by cutting it down at its very roots. I have also been as fatal to Tippu-Tib, Rashid, his nephew, who captured Stanley Falls from Captain Deane, Tippu-Tib's son, Muini Mubala, and, lastly, Said-bin-Abed,--the son of my old host, Tanganyika, as Abed-bin-Salim was called — as if I had led the avengers myself, which I was very much solicited to do. It has all been part of the policy I chalked out for myself in Africa, and urged repeatedly on the King of the Belgians, at every interview I have had with him, with one paramount object in view,--the destruction of the slave-traffic. At this very time, we have a great scheme which
to have been managed with dexterity, and the proceeds of the sales, such as they were, proved of great service to the agents of the Government, by enabling them to purchase other vessels. We see how capitally those stational agents, Franklin and Deane, were conducting that Naval Bureau, against the like of which, in our case, Mr. Adams had so warmly protested. I again quote: In April, the Lexington arrived in France, and the old difficulties were renewed. But the Commissioners at Parihe diplomatic correspondence of the day to have been greater than that produced in the previous war by the squadron of the celebrated Thurot. Insurance rose to an enormous height, and in speaking of the cruise of Captain Wickes, in particular, Mr. Deane observes in one of his letters to Robert Morris, that it effectually alarmed England, prevented the great fair at Chester, occasioned insurance to rise, and even deterred the English merchants from shipping in English bottoms, at any rate, so t
in the rear through which the charge is exploded in about 1 1/4 seconds. o o is a Spanish bullet containing a charge of powder and a fulminate. p is the Swiss federal bullet. p p, the Swiss Wurstemberger bullet. q and q are views of the Jacob's bullet and shell. r and r are views of the Peter's ball, having an interior tige; one view shows it distended and battered. s is the Belgian bullet. t, Pritchell's bullet. u, Mangeot's bullet. v v, Austrian bullets. w w, Deane and Adams's bullets, with tails. x, English bullet, with wad. y, Sardinian bullet. z, Beckwith's bullet. a a, steel-pointed bullet. b b, the Charrin bullet, with zinc or steel point. c c, c c, Tamissier's steel-pointed bullet; one view showing it intact, and the other after compression in the grooves of the rifle. d d, the Saxon bullet. e e, the Baden modification of the Minie, with tinned iron cup. f f, Wilkinson's bullet. g g, Whitworth's hexagonal bullet.
f their grandfather, and were living in 1669. He was brother to Michael of Wat., and to William of Scituate, and removed here from Scituate, in 1653, according to Deane, who adds a melancholy note: We notice the following entry in the Plymouth Colony Records, 1653: A suit was commenced against William Barstow by Mr. Charles Chaunilliam Barstow to retract. The explanation of this is, that George Barstow was a member of the Second Church in Scituate, with which Mr. Chauncy was at variance. Deane's Hist. Scituate. p. 219. Baster, Joseph, by w. Mary, had Mary, b. 13 May 1643. Savage says he removed to Boston in 1647, and had other children. Batherickhomas Oldham of Scituate 1656; Elizabeth, m. John Bryant of Scituate 1657; Sarah, bap. in Scituate 1645, m. Israel Hobart 1676; Hannah, bap. in Scituate 1646. See Deane's Hist. Scituate, pp. 190-194, and Hist. New London, by F. M. Caulkins, p. 363. Wood, Richard (otherwise written Woods and Woodes), by w. Sarah, had Thomas, b
garet, aged four years, and George aged two years, who were taken into the family of their grandfather, and were living in 1669. He was brother to Michael of Wat., and to William of Scituate, and removed here from Scituate, in 1653, according to Deane, who adds a melancholy note: We notice the following entry in the Plymouth Colony Records, 1653: A suit was commenced against William Barstow by Mr. Charles Chauncy (afterwards President), for saying that he (Mr. Chauncy) was the cause of the denion with said Church, which hastened his death through grief. The court ordered William Barstow to retract. The explanation of this is, that George Barstow was a member of the Second Church in Scituate, with which Mr. Chauncy was at variance. Deane's Hist. Scituate. p. 219. Baster, Joseph, by w. Mary, had Mary, b. 13 May 1643. Savage says he removed to Boston in 1647, and had other children. Batherick, or Baverick, Thomas, m. Ruth, dau. of Roger Buck, about 1670, and perhaps resided
4, a. about 84. His children were Samuel; John; Theophilus; Daniel (was born 29 Nov. 1630, at the Free Schoolhouse in Maidstone, Kent, Old England; was one of the most prominent citizens of New London, Conn., a Judge, etc., and d. 14 Ap. 1719, aged 88. No man in the county stood higher in point of talent and integrity); Mary, m. Thomas Oldham of Scituate 1656; Elizabeth, m. John Bryant of Scituate 1657; Sarah, bap. in Scituate 1645, m. Israel Hobart 1676; Hannah, bap. in Scituate 1646. See Deane's Hist. Scituate, pp. 190-194, and Hist. New London, by F. M. Caulkins, p. 363. Wood, Richard (otherwise written Woods and Woodes), by w. Sarah, had Thomas, b. 22 Oct. 1650; Deliverance, b. 8 Jan. 1653; Joshua, b. 29 Mar. 1657, m. Elizabeth Buck 28 Aug. 1678; James, b. 17 June 1659; Rebecca, twin, b. 17 June 1659, d. 7 Feb. 1659-60; Rachel, b. 14 Feb. 1660-61. Rich-Ard the f. was a farmer, and resided on the south side of the river; he d. 17 Jan. 1669; his real estate was sold by his w
oole. Robbins. Sparhawk. Warland. Bartlett, 484, 5. Biglow. Buttrick. Kidder. Sanders. Thwing. Wayte. Barstow, 485. Chauncy. Deane. Marrett. Baster, 485. Batherick, 485, 6. Beeger. Boyce. Brooks. Buck. Giner. Hook. Prentice. Robbins. Russell. Wales. Beaings. Holmes. Prince. Reyner. Roberts. Tyng. Wyeth. Foxcroft, 548-50. Andros. Appleton. Brandon. Bridge. Coney. Danforth. Deane. Fiske. Flint. Gerrish. Haskins. Leverett. Lyon. Merriam. Norton. Phillips. Sumner. Upham. Winslow. Witherell. Francis, 5ings. Phillips. Tolman. Townsend. Warren. Wiswall, 701. Farmer. Jackson. Newman. Witherell, 701. Benjamin. Bryant. Caulkins. Deane. Hobart. Oldham. Parish. Wood, 701. Buck. Fuller. Greenwood. Maccoone. Oldham. Rushton. Woodmancy, 702. Clark. Woodward, 702
n us at daylight of the 28th. Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. Morning reports. 1864. Oct. 25. One recruit received—Timothy Herlehy. Two horses shot by order E. L. Smith, Lieut. Battery K, 4th U. S. Ar'ty, A. A. I. G. Oct. 26. Corp. G. A. Pease sent to general hospital. Oct. 27. Lieut's Granger and Smith and Privates A. C. Billings and Farrell wounded and sent to hospital. McAuliffe, leg broken also sent to hospital. Lieut. E. L. Smith Battery K, 4th U. S. Art'y and Lieut. Deane, 6th Me. Art'y temporarily attached. Seven horses shot in action. Hiram Pike slightly wounded. Oct. 28. Lieut. Asa Smith died at general hospital City Point, Va., from effects of wound received Oct. 27. Lieut. Granger sent to general hospital also Billings, Farrell and McAuliffe. Oct. 29. Capt. Sleeper returned to duty front leave of absence since Aug. 25. Lieut. Wm. G. Rollins returned to duty from ammunition train. Oct. 30. Private C. A. Mason dropped from the rolls Oct. 23 i
, Rowanty, 327, 372. Creek, Sailor's. 417. Cranston, George T., 351. Critchett, Moses G.,48, 79, 86. Cross, Joseph, 48, 80, 81, 82, 201, 208, 405, 407. Culpepper, 128, 140. Currant, Joseph H., 31, 83, 184, 198, 200, 201, 358, 397. Cusick, Thomas, 326, 339, 398, 402. Custer, Gen., 421. D. Dabney's Mill, 391, 411, 412. Damrell, Edwin F., 87, 209, 237, 242. Davis, Moses K., 28, 29. Davis, Col. P. S., 51, 81. Day, George H., 150, 151, 207, 369, 380, 382, 400, 401, 402. Deane, Lieut. Sixth Me. Artillery, 365, 375. Deep Bottom, 295, 297, 326. De Trobriand, Gen., 160, 358, 373, 374. Devens, Gen., Chas., 200, 201, 202. Devereaux, Geo. N., 242, 303, 304, 305, 324, 338, 348. Devine, Timothy, 405, 406. Dixon, Geo. M., 47, 80. Dictator, Mortar, 298. Dillingham, Capt., 65. Doe, Chas. W., 31, 151, 208, 406, 407. Donnelly, Win. G., 87, 184. Drewry's Bluff, 297. Dwight, James, 47, 80, 201, 205, 207, 407, 409. E. Early, Gen., 293. Edwards, Joseph, 401, 402.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
phan Asylum, the lads from the Young Men's Christian Association, and an organization known to itself as the Sheep Hill Ruffle-necks. Every child carried a flag or a banner, and the scene created by the contingent of young America as they marched through the streets to martial music and inspiring drum-tap, was indeed picturesque and impressive. They were commanded by Mr. D. Smith Redford, who had as his staff Messrs. Gibbs, Jones, Winfree, Chesley, Crump, Byrne, Wren, Batkins, Phillips and Deane. Next in line were the cadets of the Virginia Military Institute, 18o strong, commanded by Colonel Charles R. Marshall, a man of wide military experience. A more magnificent specimen of youthful soldiery has never been seen here than this corps appeared as it drew up into line just to the right of Chief-Marshal Fitz Lee and his staff. They marched as an escort to General Lee, and they were the cynosure of all eyes. The lads from the Institute were clad in full-dress uniform, consisting
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